Search found 8 matches

by Jordan Larrea 1E
Sun Jul 16, 2017 10:37 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configurations
Replies: 4
Views: 427

Re: Electron Configurations

Is it possible to solve for the electron configuration of an excited atom if so how? When given an excited atom, the easiest way for me is to solve for its ground state. Then it's just a matter of adding of subtracting the charge. If it has a positive charge, we know it lost some electrons and woul...
by Jordan Larrea 1E
Sun Jul 16, 2017 10:14 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Seesaw Structure question
Replies: 3
Views: 761

Re: Seesaw Structure question

In the seesaw, you have 4 atoms and an electron pair. The pair does repel a good amount, but the repulsion of the other atoms cannot be neglected. To put the electrons on top and have the other 4 as a pyramid base would have too much repulsion from the 4 atoms. the seesaw shape puts enough space bet...
by Jordan Larrea 1E
Sun Jul 16, 2017 9:58 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Octet Rule [ENDORSED]
Replies: 9
Views: 997

Re: Octet Rule [ENDORSED]

Do we have these exceptions to the octet rule only when we are more concerned with formal charge? These exceptions have more to do with the fact that the d orbital is available, so it is used. Recall that the transition metals have a configuration one less than the row they're in, meaning that the ...
by Jordan Larrea 1E
Sun Jul 16, 2017 9:46 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: P, S, Cl can have more than 8 electrons?
Replies: 2
Views: 475

Re: P, S, Cl can have more than 8 electrons?

Once you get to the third row, you have the 3d orbital to consider. Remember that the transition metals are one less than the row they're in, meaning the ones in the n=4 row have the 3d configuration. This means that the elements in the third row can use the d orbital to exceed the octet rule. It is...
by Jordan Larrea 1E
Sun Jul 02, 2017 8:30 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Wave properties of electrons
Replies: 2
Views: 288

Re: Wave properties of electrons

The course reader has a good illustration of constructive and destructive interference. Imagine two waves on top of each other. When the peaks and troughs line up, it makes the amplitude bigger (constructive). When the peaks of one wave line up with the troughs of the other, I imagine that they coll...
by Jordan Larrea 1E
Sun Jul 02, 2017 8:13 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Amplitude versus wavelength
Replies: 4
Views: 393

Re: Amplitude versus wavelength

Wavelength and frequency are inversely related. The longer the wavelength, the lower the frequency. Amplitude is not necessarily related to either wavelength or frequency. Instead, wavelength deals with intensity. So you cannot say anything about amplitude based on whether the wavelength or frequenc...
by Jordan Larrea 1E
Sun Jul 02, 2017 7:49 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Identifying Empirical and Molecular Formulas [ENDORSED]
Replies: 13
Views: 5036

Re: Identifying Empirical and Molecular Formulas [ENDORSED]

The empirical formula is the formula that shows the ratio of atoms. The molecular formula shows the actual number of atoms. An example would be CH2O. This is the empirical formula for glucose, which is C6H12O6. You can see that for every one atom of C, there are two of H and one of O. This is given ...
by Jordan Larrea 1E
Sun Jul 02, 2017 7:36 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Amplitude of the wave [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 649

Re: Amplitude of the wave [ENDORSED]

I believe that amplitude is related to the intensity of the light. The energy is changed by changing the frequency. This is why the photoelectric experiment proved light does not have wave properties. They expected more intense waves (bigger amplitude) to be able to remove electrons. But when this f...

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