Search found 56 matches

by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sat Mar 17, 2018 2:19 pm
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: Entropy of vaporization? 9.37
Replies: 1
Views: 211

Re: Entropy of vaporization? 9.37

I think this is because the problem asks for the standard reaction entropy of the formation of H 2 O (l) from the elements in their most stable state at 298 K . Since you are calculating ΔS° using S° values, I don't think ΔS vap is included in the calculations. See the difference between the the ΔS°...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sat Mar 17, 2018 1:36 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Determining Slow Step
Replies: 2
Views: 813

Re: Determining Slow Step

We did this in the reaction mechanism past exam problem in class on Wednesday. You would pretend every step is the slow step and find its rate law to see if it matches the overall rate law. It's a little bit of extra work to check every step but it's the same procedure as if you were told which step...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sat Mar 17, 2018 1:27 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Nernst Equation
Replies: 2
Views: 185

Re: Nernst Equation

E = E^{\circ} - \frac{RT}{nF}lnQ This is the general Nernst equation that can be used at any temperature (K). E = E^{\circ} - \frac{0.0592}{n}logQ This form of the Nernst equation is for calculations at 25°C (298 K). It was found by converting ln to log: ln = 2.503*log 10 Then using T=298 K: \frac{...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sat Mar 17, 2018 1:15 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Closed systems
Replies: 2
Views: 269

Re: Closed systems

Only closed systems will be affected by ΔU = q + w. Refer back to the definitions of open/closed/isolated systems: 1) open: both matter and energy can exchange with surroundings - can't measure ΔU because changes in matter are not accounted for in ΔU = q + w 2) closed: energy (q/w) can exchange with...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sun Mar 11, 2018 4:33 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Electrochem Review session problem 14.47
Replies: 2
Views: 132

Re: Electrochem Review session problem 14.47

Following the work in the solutions manual, Q = 3.3 x 106, so technically your answer is the most accurate. I think the magnitude of Q is the most important point in the answer so that's why the solution manual says Q = 106.
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sun Mar 11, 2018 4:26 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: 9.99
Replies: 1
Views: 95

Re: 9.99

The dehydrogenation of cyclohexane to benzene is not spontaneous: C 6 H 12 --> C 6 H 6 + 3H 2 ΔG° r = +97.6 kJ/mol However, if it is paired spontaneous process where a molecule can accept the hydrogen product, the entire process will turn spontaneous. Ethene accepting hydrogen is spontaneous: C 2 H ...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sun Mar 11, 2018 4:12 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 8.117
Replies: 1
Views: 102

Re: 8.117

In order to solve for ΔU, you need ΔH, P and ΔV. The given information says that ΔH = -318 kJ and that there is production of 1 mol of H 2 . One way to visualize this is to divide the entire equation by 3 to show that there is 1 mol of H 2 being produced: (1/3)CH 4 (g)+(1/3)H 2 O(g) --> (1/3)CO 2 (g...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sun Mar 04, 2018 8:56 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: Initial concentrations
Replies: 2
Views: 121

Re: Initial concentrations

The integrated rate laws of zero, first and second order reactions depend on initial concentration because all of them contain [A] 0 . However, when deriving the half-life equations, only zero and second order reactions depend on initial concentration. 0 order reaction half-life: t 1/2 = [A] 0 /2k 1...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sun Mar 04, 2018 8:30 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: 15.23 c
Replies: 2
Views: 130

Re: 15.23 c

First, find [A] t . The reaction starts with [A] 0 = 0.153 mol A and produces [B] t = 0.034 mol B during some time interval. Using the stoichiometric ratios in the given reaction, [A] 0 must have reacted at a rate of (2 mol A/1 mol B) to end up with [A] t = 0.153 mol/L A - (2 mol A/1 mol B)(0.034 mo...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sun Mar 04, 2018 8:20 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Half Life
Replies: 6
Views: 228

Re: Half Life

The half-life of a reaction is the time required for a reactant to reach half its original concentration. This information is helpful to predict the concentration of a substance over time. Another application that Dr. Lavelle mentioned in class is that knowing the half-life can help to identify an u...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Fri Feb 23, 2018 2:26 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: 14.17
Replies: 3
Views: 168

Re: 14.17

What happens in this reaction to the potassium and the chloride though? And are we supposed to assume that permanganate will always dissociate into Mn 2+ and Fe 2+ into Fe 3+ ? In this reaction and in most reactions, potassium ion and chloride are spectator ions because their oxidation states do no...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Thu Feb 22, 2018 6:57 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: 14.17
Replies: 3
Views: 168

Re: 14.17

Dr. Lavelle has this pdf ( https://lavelle.chem.ucla.edu/wp-content/supporting-files/Chem14B/Balancing_Redox_Reactions_Acidic_Conditions.pdf ) which explains how to get the half-reactions for this redox reaction. Follow each step to get the half-reaction for the iron and the half-reaction for the pe...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Thu Feb 22, 2018 6:45 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Cell diagram
Replies: 4
Views: 179

Re: Cell diagram

There is no convention for which compound to put first, but it would make logical sense to place Cl2(g) before Cl-(aq) to show that Cl2 is being reduced to Cl-.
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:31 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Correct Answer For Test 1 Question 7
Replies: 4
Views: 326

Re: Correct Answer For Test 1 Question 7

Yes, that is correct. The setup is qice=-qtea, which is nΔHfus + mCΔT = -mCΔT. You plugged in all the right numbers and got the correct final temperature.
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:20 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: given two temperatures and 2 volumes solve for delta S
Replies: 2
Views: 156

Re: given two temperatures and 2 volumes solve for delta S

Since entropy is a state function, you can calculate ΔS in steps. In step 1, assume isothermal conditions and consider the change in volume to use ΔS 1 =nRln(V1/V2). Then in step 2, assume isochoric (no change in volume) conditions and consider the change in temperature to use ΔS 1 =nCln(T1/T2). In ...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:15 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Delta U as 0
Replies: 3
Views: 202

Re: Delta U as 0

Those are all correct. What these conditions all have in common is that there is no change in temperature. This fact can be given if the problem says the process is explicitly isothermal, or no q is added/removed (adiabatic), or you could possibly deduct no change in temperature from PV=nRT.
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:03 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Practice Midterm 4
Replies: 3
Views: 256

Re: Practice Midterm 4

You have all the correct concepts and formulas. Check your units to see if you have made any errors. In the first step, you will use w = -PΔV but make sure you use R = 101.3 J/L*atm to get w = +3.04 kJ. As you stated, the work in the second step is zero. For the third step, use w = -nRTln(V2/V1) = -...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:35 pm
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: 9.47
Replies: 2
Views: 132

Re: 9.47

You would use the initial volume because the problem states that the "ideal gas at 323 K occupies 1.67 L at 4.95 atm." This phrase describes the conditions of the ideal gas, and you would use these values in the ideal gas law to calculate an unknown value (which in this case is moles).
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:30 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: 11.83
Replies: 2
Views: 106

Re: 11.83

That is also a viable method to solve this problem because you're solving for K at 25°C (standard state). If you look up the standard Gibbs free energy of formation for the products and reactants, you can use the difference of sums method to calculate ΔG°. Set ΔG°=-RTlnK to solve for K at 25°C. Then...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Thu Feb 08, 2018 6:22 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: 9.35
Replies: 1
Views: 107

Re: 9.35

0.5 mol is used for B and C because they are both described as diatomic molecules. This means that 1 mol of atoms is actually 0.5 mol of gas since the atoms pair up. 1 vibrational degree means that we are dealing with a "complex" molecule so you would use the corresponding Cv value of 3R. ...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Jan 31, 2018 10:56 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: HW 9.35 Vibrational degree of freedom
Replies: 1
Views: 105

Re: HW 9.35 Vibrational degree of freedom

I think that the 1 vibrational degree of freedom comes from the phrase "vibrationally active" given in the question. This means that the gas has additional vibrational states and is therefore more "complex" so you would use the 3R value of Cv for complex molecules. The diatomic m...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Jan 31, 2018 10:42 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: 9.1 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 149

Re: 9.1 [ENDORSED]

So the signs would be in reference to the system? This particular problem asks for "the rate that your body generates entropy in your surroundings." Therefore, the answers would have signs in reference to the surroundings. The sign of ΔS depends on direction of heat flow. This example is ...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Jan 31, 2018 10:27 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: homework 9.19
Replies: 4
Views: 153

Re: homework 9.19

To find ΔS for change in temperature (for example: in the first step of this problem, T1=358 K and T2=373 K), you would use the equation for ΔS=n*C p *ln(T2/T1) which is derived from ΔS=q/T and nCΔT. Since this problem is asking for standard entropy, you can use the formula without n (ΔS=C p *ln(T2/...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:12 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Calculating internal energy in isobaric reaction
Replies: 3
Views: 198

Re: Calculating internal energy in isobaric reaction

If we use the formula nCpDeltaT, where 5/2R can be replaced for Cp to calculate the change in internal energy for an ideal gas at constant pressure , how would we calculate the change in internal energy for just a normal isobaric reaction that did not involve a gas? For an isobaric process, you wou...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:07 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Calculating internal energy in isobaric reaction
Replies: 3
Views: 198

Re: Calculating internal energy in isobaric reaction

Dylan Mai 1D wrote:Can someone also explain what an isobaric reaction is?

An isobaric process occurs when the pressure remains constant. To calculate work in an isobaric process, you would use the equation w= -PexΔV.
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Jan 24, 2018 1:09 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Lecture 1/24 (Wednesday) [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 134

Re: Lecture 1/24 (Wednesday) [ENDORSED]

The calculation of a reversible, isothermal expansion of a gas is explained on pages 265-266 of Chapter 8 in the textbook. The green shaded box shows the derivation of the formula using integrals, which is what Dr. Lavelle did in class today.
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:42 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Example 8.7
Replies: 1
Views: 81

Re: Example 8.7

The units for ΔH are Joules. If you are trying to find the change in enthalpy (ΔH) for 2 mol of benzene, you need to multiply by q (J) in the numerator and n (mol) in the denominator to end up with the ΔH in Joules. \Delta H = \frac{(2 mol)\cdot (-8.60\cdot 551J)}{(0.113/78.12 mo...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:30 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: HW #1 PART E
Replies: 3
Views: 165

Re: HW #1 PART E

A closed system is one that can exchange energy but not matter with the surroundings. Mercury in a thermometer exchanges energy with its surroundings to rise and fall in the tube and indicate the temperature, but it does not leak and exchange matter. Hope this helps!
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:21 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Specific Heat Capacity
Replies: 3
Views: 132

Re: Specific Heat Capacity

Yes, K stands for Kelvin. The "steps" or the magnitude of degrees on the Kelvin and Celsius scale are equivalent so they can be used interchangeably in definitions like units.
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Fri Jan 12, 2018 3:24 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: 8.25
Replies: 1
Views: 105

Re: 8.25

Since the question states that this is occurring in a constant-volume calorimeter, you don't need to worry about volumes. In addition, the heat capacity of a calorimeter is an extensive property so moles don't matter. Using q=CΔT rearranged to C=q/ΔT, you can calculate this heat capacity and then us...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Fri Jan 12, 2018 3:13 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Enthalpy of vaporization
Replies: 2
Views: 172

Re: Enthalpy of vaporization

Enthalpy of vaporization (ΔH vap ) is the difference in molar enthalpy (H m ) between the vapor and liquid states. All the "H"s mean enthalpy. The "Δ" in ΔH vap shows the change in enthalpy of the vapor and liquid states. The "m" in H m indicates that we are using molar...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Fri Jan 12, 2018 1:43 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: heat capacity of a gas at constant pressure
Replies: 1
Views: 91

Re: heat capacity of a gas at constant pressure

Usually the Cp or Cv will be given in the question unless there is sufficient information (q, n/m, ΔT) given to calculate the missing C. For a complete table of Cp values, you can refer to the textbook Appendix 2A.
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sat Dec 09, 2017 10:49 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: % Ionization [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 446

Re: % Ionization [ENDORSED]

For a given equation: acid + H 2 O ⇌ H 3 O + + conjugate base % ionization/dissociation = ([equilibrium concentration of H 3 O + ] / [initial concentration of acid]) x 100 For a given equation: base + H 2 O ⇌ OH - + conjugate acid % ionization/dissociation = ([equilibrium concentration of OH - ] / [...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sat Dec 09, 2017 10:39 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Spin Quantum Number: Test 3
Replies: 3
Views: 219

Re: Spin Quantum Number: Test 3

The question asks "Write all the possible values that a spin quantum number can take for this electron." It can be either +1/2 or -1/2 because the "positive" and "negative" directions are relative. The + and - do not necessarily mean "up" or "down;" ...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sun Dec 03, 2017 3:13 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Sig Figs for Calculating pH and pOH
Replies: 4
Views: 232

Sig Figs for Calculating pH and pOH

For calculating logarithms/pH/pOH, the number of sig figs comes from the mantissa aka after the decimal place. However, for some problems (such as 12.27 and 12.29), the solutions manual does not acknowledge this. If the calculation was pH=-log(0.0 25 ) (2 sig figs), wouldn't the answer be 1. 60 with...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Sun Dec 03, 2017 12:46 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: 12.35
Replies: 1
Views: 124

Re: 12.35

Yes, you would solve for Ka2 using the same antilog method. Ka2 is the disassociation constant for the second deprotonation for polyprotic acids, while Ka1 is the disassociation constant for the first deprotonation. In this problem, since you are given pKa2, you would solve for Ka2.
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:34 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 11.11 part C
Replies: 1
Views: 132

Re: 11.11 part C

The ratio of [O 2 ]/[O 3 ] is different from [O 2 ] 3 /[O 3 ] 2 because the concentrations are raised to different powers. If [O 2 ]=2 and [O 3 ]=3, [O 2 ]/[O 3 ] would be 2/3 and [O 2 ] 3 /[O 3 ] 2 would be (2) 3 /(3) 2 =8/9. You can see that 2/3 does not equal 8/9, so [O 2 ]/[O 3 ] does not equal ...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:06 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structure of IO2F2 (-2) Problem 4.23 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 2737

Re: Lewis Structure of IO2F2 (-2) Problem 4.23 [ENDORSED]

I did the same thing to create a more stable structure. The solution manual notes that other Lewis structures with double bonds are possible, but the use of single vs. double bonds does not change the shape of the molecule. If you draw it with single or double bonds, the molecule is still see-saw, s...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:00 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 4.31
Replies: 2
Views: 131

Re: 4.31

Yes, that's exactly how. The hybridization is based on the areas of electron density around the atom. In other words, it's based on how many "things" (atoms or lone pairs) are attached to the central atom (or the particular atom you are looking at - every atom in the molecule can have hybr...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Tue Nov 21, 2017 12:52 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 4.73
Replies: 2
Views: 147

Re: 4.73

A molecule is considered a radical if it has an odd number of electrons. CH 2 has 6 total electrons and CH 2 2+ has 4 total electrons. The incomplete octet of the central atom does not directly affect whether a molecule is a radical. However, if carbon had an incomplete octet of with an odd number o...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:44 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Bond Angles
Replies: 8
Views: 432

Re: Bond Angles

You can just memorize/visualize the bond angles for each VSEPR shape and then if there are any lone pairs present (AX 2 E , AX 3 E 2 , etc.), the bond angle would be less than the "original" bond angles (listed below). You can just state that the bond angles are <___° (the bond angles with...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Nov 15, 2017 10:42 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Order of s,p,d in Names of Hybrid Orbitals
Replies: 3
Views: 161

Order of s,p,d in Names of Hybrid Orbitals

When naming hybridization, do the hybrid orbitals have to be written in the same order as the atomic orbitals (s,p,d,f) in electron configurations? For example, when we write the electron configuration of elements that contain electrons in the d-orbital, we write Ni: [Ar]3d 8 4s 2 , with the d-orbit...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Tue Nov 07, 2017 2:39 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 3.41
Replies: 1
Views: 185

Re: 3.41

The formula for glycine is H2C(NH2)COOH. The NH2 in parentheses after the first carbon means that NH2 is attached to the carbon in H2C. So from left to right, draw NH2 and then attach the nitrogen to the carbon in H2C. Then, add COOH by attaching a carbon to the carbon in H2C. Add the oxygens and hy...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Mon Nov 06, 2017 4:43 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole Moment of CO
Replies: 3
Views: 593

Re: Dipole Moment of CO

The difference in electronegativity between carbon and oxygen creates a small dipole moment. Only diatomic atoms (like O2) are truly covalent.
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Nov 01, 2017 9:51 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Exceptions to Electron Configurations
Replies: 1
Views: 119

Re: Exceptions to Electron Configurations

I'm also curious as to why tungsten is not an exception like chromium and copper. From my knowledge, the exceptions with special configurations are chromium and molybdenum (s1d5) and copper, silver and gold (s1d10).
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Nov 01, 2017 9:42 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Order of Orbitals
Replies: 10
Views: 516

Re: Order of Orbitals

The order of orbitals does matter. When you write the electron configuration for an element, you must follow the Aufbau ("building up") Principle and write the orbitals in order of increasing energy. Therefore, if you have 3d and 4s, you need to write 3d before 4s because the 3d state is l...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Nov 01, 2017 9:37 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Copper and Chromium [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 524

Re: Copper and Chromium [ENDORSED]

These configurations for copper and chromium are more stable because they result in a more symmetric distribution of the electrons. For chromium, the electron configuration [Ar]3d5 4s1 distributes the 6 valence electrons evenly. 5 electrons fill the 5 d-orbitals and 1 electron fills the single s-orb...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Oct 25, 2017 3:39 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: List of all trends?
Replies: 5
Views: 433

Re: List of all trends?

I find it helpful to draw two diagonal arrows (one towards the top right and the other towards the bottom left corner) and label the trends. Increase across a period and up a group (towards top right corner): ionization energy, electron affinity, nonmetallic character Increase left on a period and d...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Oct 25, 2017 3:31 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Problem 2.67 (c) and (d)
Replies: 2
Views: 162

Re: Problem 2.67 (c) and (d)

In addition to increasing across a period, electron affinity values generally increase up a group. This is seen in the two problems posted. Chlorine is above bromine and has a higher electron affinity. Lithium is above sodium so it also has a higher electron affinity.
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Tue Oct 17, 2017 10:19 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Question about Atomic Spectroscopy
Replies: 4
Views: 272

Re: Question about Atomic Spectroscopy

wait so if every element has a unique spectroscopy then how do our problems all coincide with the same spectrums/ do we need to memorize the spectrum lines (Laymen series etc)??? All our homework/test problems concerning spectroscopy deal with hydrogen, so we have only been working with its atomic ...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Tue Oct 17, 2017 10:01 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Question about energy levels [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 451

Re: Question about energy levels [ENDORSED]

There is no specific cut off for the highest energy level, but most elements have energy levels from n=1 to about n=6-7. This is because n=1-7 is the range of quantum numbers seen in the periodic table of elements (7 rows = 7 energy levels). Most diagrams draw the energy levels up to n=6-7 and then ...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Fri Oct 13, 2017 3:12 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Exercise 1.9 Sig Fig
Replies: 3
Views: 210

Re: Exercise 1.9 Sig Fig

I think that technically the answer would be 6.0 x 10^-7 m for wavelength. However, it is easier to identify and compare wavelengths if the value is given in nanometers so it would be converted to 600 nm. If you wanted to be specific about sig figs, you could write a bar above the first zero to indi...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:53 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Heisenberg uncertainty Principle
Replies: 1
Views: 135

Re: Heisenberg uncertainty Principle

Heisenberg's uncertainty principle states that you can never simultaneously know the exact position and the exact speed/momentum of an object. This is expressed in the equation ΔpΔx ≥ (1/2)(h bar). Δx is the uncertainty in position and Δp is the uncertainty in momentum and the product of these must ...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:23 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: E29 (d) Significant Figures
Replies: 3
Views: 333

Re: E29 (d) Significant Figures

In this question, the value 8.61 g is actually not relevant. Part (d) asks "What fraction of the total mass of the sample was due to oxygen?" All the values you need for this are derived from the periodic table, not the 8.61 at the beginning of the question. To find the fraction of the mas...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:13 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Limiting Reagents [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 549

Re: Limiting Reagents [ENDORSED]

Generally, if the problem gives you an amount (in grams or moles) of each reactant to make a calculation, you are implicitly asked to find the limiting reactant. A good example of this is question M.7 (b), which asks "What mass of boron can be produced when 125 kg of boron oxide is heated with ...
by Thuy-Anh Bui 1I
Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:05 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Exercise L39 part b
Replies: 2
Views: 202

Re: Exercise L39 part b

SnO2 is an ionic compound so you would use the procedure to write the name for ionic compounds (metal + nonmetal), which is: 1. Determine the charge on the cation (Sn = +4) and anion (O = -2). 2. Name the cation. If it is a transition metal, put its charge in parentheses. For this example, you would...

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