Search found 62 matches

by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Mar 17, 2018 11:14 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Strength of Oxidation/Reducing Agents
Replies: 2
Views: 237

Re: Strength of Oxidation/Reducing Agents

The basic idea is that most positive potential is more oxidizing and the most negative are more reducing. page 579 offers a great chart to see how oxidizing power changes with cell potential.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Mar 17, 2018 11:13 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Acidic/ basic conditions
Replies: 4
Views: 297

Re: Acidic/ basic conditions

For basic equations, they say balance the O's by adding H2O to the side that needs it, then add to the other side the an H2O for every H atom present. And add to the same side an OH for every H present.

See page 567 for more details.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Mar 17, 2018 11:08 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells
Replies: 2
Views: 245

Re: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells

Galvanic cells consist of an anode and a cathode that would produce a spontaneous reaction between them. In order for there to be a spontaneous reaction, the gibbs free energy must be negative, so that means that the standard cell potential must be positive as G=-nFE. Knowing this, this means that o...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Mar 17, 2018 6:58 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Finding Standard Cell Potential
Replies: 1
Views: 112

Re: Finding Standard Cell Potential

Because in this case, you're not finding the Standard Cell Potential where the electrons cancel everything out evenly. You're combining two half-reactions to form a half-reaction, which is why we have to do a different method of finding the Gibbs Free Energy, because Gibbs Free energy is a state fun...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:15 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: 15.61 units
Replies: 1
Views: 104

Re: 15.61 units

I supposed that it doesn't, but for simplicity sakes, I think it would be easier to convert your final answer into kJ to make it easier to read.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Fri Mar 16, 2018 10:53 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Cell Diagram
Replies: 3
Views: 142

Re: Cell Diagram

For each part (reduction and oxidation), the reactants go on the left, and the products go on the right and are separated by a |. Thus, it looks like this (reactant of anode)|(product of anoode)||(reactant of cathode)|(product of cathode) If the reactants and products are in the same phase (ie aqueo...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Fri Mar 16, 2018 9:26 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: 15.63
Replies: 2
Views: 134

Re: 15.63

The lnA's cancel each other out. It was just an error in the solutions manual. The minus sign is supposed to be an equal sign. Its .59 is equal to -(activation energy)/(gas constant)*(1/t1)-(1/t2)

or

by Curtis Wong 2D
Fri Mar 16, 2018 9:21 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: determining cathode from anode
Replies: 11
Views: 498

Re: determining cathode from anode

I am pretty sure that the only way to determine the cathode from the anode is based on their standard cell potential. Cathodes are the ones that are reduced and the the Anodes are the ones that are being oxidized. And we know our Galvanic cell needs to be a positive number so whichever combination o...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Fri Mar 16, 2018 9:12 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: 15.61
Replies: 2
Views: 131

Re: 15.61

The change in T can be derived as the two ln equations subtracting from each other.

Which means that the lnA cancel each other out when the two equations subtract from one another.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Fri Mar 16, 2018 9:11 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Change in Entropy Equations
Replies: 2
Views: 212

Re: Change in Entropy Equations

Alright, so the first equation is typically the base for all the equations. It is useful for all scenarios because you can modify it. It's based on a constant temperature too. The only instance where I found the second equation is when it talked about phase change. So, when there's a phase change, y...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Wed Feb 21, 2018 3:11 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 14.31c
Replies: 1
Views: 98

Re: 14.31c

Pb^4+ + 2e- ---> Pb^2+ should be the anode where Pb^4+ will be on the right side of the half-reaction. And this is mainly because of the fact that in the final equation, we can see hat Pb^4+ should be on the right side. Thus it is the anode. 2 Pb^2(aq)--->Pb(s)+ Pb^4+(aq) Now for Pb(s)--->Pb^2+ + 2e...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:03 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: cell diagram
Replies: 1
Views: 94

Re: cell diagram

I think they said that we have to put Pt when the reactant and product are of the same phases.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:02 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: how to write a cell diagram [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 529

Re: how to write a cell diagram [ENDORSED]

So the order is typically Inert Metal (if applicable) | (Anode reactant) | (anode product) || (Cathode reactant) | (cathode product)| (Inert Metal if applicable).
by Curtis Wong 2D
Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:41 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: Van't Hoff equation
Replies: 4
Views: 435

Re: Van't Hoff equation

I would imagine so. Isn't the Van't Hoff equation broken down into those two equations that you mentioned? So I feel like it would be ok.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:40 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Endothermic Favorable?
Replies: 2
Views: 265

Re: Endothermic Favorable?

If you have an endothermic reaction, that means Delta H is positive. Delta S depends. If Delta S was positive, then by Delta G = Delta H - T*Delta S, the reaction would be favorable at high temperatures. If Delta S was negative, then the reaction would not be favorable at any temperature.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:22 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: 9.15 confusion
Replies: 2
Views: 161

Re: 9.15 confusion

Since we're calculating phase change you can find the value of 43.5 on page 284, where it lists all the values of the standard enthalpies of phase changes.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:19 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Heat Transfer with no temperature given
Replies: 2
Views: 140

Re: Heat Transfer with no temperature given

Since it gives pressure, I am assuming that it involves gas. That simply means you would need to use the PV=nrt formula to figure out temperature, solving for T.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:17 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: 9.57
Replies: 1
Views: 89

Re: 9.57

In regards to that, essentially, since we know that at standard temperature, it would 298 K. So you would just need to look up the Gibbs Free Energy from the appendix and calculate it from that, not from delta G = Delta H - T * Delta S.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:54 pm
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: Standard Molar Entropy Question
Replies: 3
Views: 343

Re: Standard Molar Entropy Question

Remember that entropy also depends on the complexity of the molecule itself, so that also means the elements that it consists of. So in this case, F is more complex than H in terms of its atomic structure. It has more particles in its atom than H and each of those particles has more orientations pos...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:51 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Calculating Degeneracy
Replies: 3
Views: 199

Re: Calculating Degeneracy

You would use the formula to calculate the entropy. W representing degeneracy is simply the amount of orientations possible for the molecule raised to Avogadro's number if given only the fact that you have to fine the degeneracy of a just a molecular formula. Otherwise I agree with the above stateme...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:48 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Change in the Entropy of the Universe
Replies: 1
Views: 103

Re: Change in the Entropy of the Universe

So the total entropy change 0 for reversible processes is 0 because essentially it's like the entropy of the system with the entropy of its surroundings. When the system increases or decreases in entropy, then its surroundings must do the opposite in a reversible process. If it can go back to its or...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:41 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: 11.115
Replies: 1
Views: 102

Re: 11.115

Basically yes. So this goes back to about our ideas of equilibrium constants. When you compress a gas (decrease the volume), the reaction will shift to the side with less moles of gas, but since there's the same amount of moles of gas on either side, there's no effect. For the water, we only take in...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Feb 11, 2018 9:40 pm
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: Comparing Molar Entropies
Replies: 2
Views: 174

Re: Comparing Molar Entropies

Mainly due to higher molar mass and complexity of the atom/molecule. Typically, the more complex an object is, the more entropy it has due to more "disorder" or orientations that it could potentially have. Lead has more entropy than carbon due to having more particles in its atom than carb...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Feb 11, 2018 9:37 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Sublimation
Replies: 3
Views: 236

Re: Sublimation

Sublimation is the change of a solid to a gas. So in order to find the enthalpy for it, simply do the enthalpy of fusion + enthalpy of vaporization.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Feb 04, 2018 3:37 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Using dS vs change in S
Replies: 3
Views: 148

Re: Using dS vs change in S

Most likely never. Using dS involves using calculus and integrals, which isn't mainly the whole focus of the class. I see that there's no real reason in order to derive the answer from dS. In fact, most of the time you can relate dS to change in S. After all, dS can be thought of as the change in S.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Feb 04, 2018 3:35 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: 8.9
Replies: 2
Views: 162

Re: 8.9

Since we're trying to find the Internal Energy, our final answer should have energy units. By using these two R constants, our units would all cancel out to get joules as a final unit. That's why we use the two R constants.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:33 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7726
Views: 1046075

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

A line I used with my boyfriend:

"You know, I usually hate chemistry, but I love having chemistry with you."
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:31 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Heating Capacity
Replies: 3
Views: 142

Re: Heating Capacity

In Problem 9.43, we use the molar heat capacity of water in a liquid form because we have that information to do so. We know the heating capacity of water, and we needed to find the temperature in K (which is why we used Molar heat capacity). In regards to your other questions, the R is the ideal ga...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:26 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Change in Entropy of Universe
Replies: 3
Views: 193

Re: Change in Entropy of Universe

Delta S of the universe is equal to 0, because it's essentially Delta S of the system + Delta S of the surroundings. The system experiences an increase in entropy in a reversible process, but since its a reversible process, the Delta S of the surroundings experience a decrease in entropy as well. Th...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:19 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Using Q
Replies: 2
Views: 126

Re: Using Q

If the reaction is not at equilibrium, then we can use Q and that equation to solve for Gibbs Free Energy. If the reaction comes to equilibrium, then we use K.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:11 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Isolated
Replies: 9
Views: 380

Re: Isolated

So if we go back to the drawn system or like lets say a bomb calorimeter right? The whole system itself is isolated, but the things thats inside the bomb calorimeter and the isolated system are not isolated. So that's why there can be a change in temperature within the individual system thats within...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:06 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: entropy vs. Degeneracy
Replies: 4
Views: 209

Re: entropy vs. Degeneracy

Degeneracy is the number of ways of achieving a given energy state, so basically how many different orientations (of lets say a molecule) that will give the same energy level. Entropy on the other hand is disorder, or if we do not want to use the term disorder, it is the proper of the system needed ...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Feb 03, 2018 5:05 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Reversible vs Irreversible [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 199

Re: Reversible vs Irreversible [ENDORSED]

A reversible pathway has more work done than an irreversible pathway mainly due to the fact that in a reversible process, it is pushing against that external pressure and tries to achieve the maximum expansion work possible. In an irreversible pathway some of the potential of the system to do work i...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Feb 03, 2018 4:57 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: 9.52
Replies: 3
Views: 139

Re: 9.52

An endothermic process is usually not spontaneous due to the fact that by putting energy into the system, there is an external influence now acting on the system. However, the only way that an endothermic process can be spontaneous is if the increase in entropy will be greater than the increase in e...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:18 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration of Br-
Replies: 6
Views: 3462

Re: Electron Configuration of Br-

Yes it would be correct to just write as [Kr] if they ask for the shorthand of it.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:17 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Confused about What Lavelle Mentioned in class
Replies: 1
Views: 148

Re: Confused about What Lavelle Mentioned in class

Since the concentration of hydronium atoms will be so small, that they will not make that huge of an impact on the pH level of the solution. This only works if the concentration is way smaller than 10 -7 , ie like 10 -10 , in which subtracting that from 10 -7 , will not impact that severely leading ...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:09 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Using electronegativity to determine acidity
Replies: 2
Views: 304

Re: Using electronegativity to determine acidity

As for the reading from the textbook, on page 469 in Chapter 12. "Metals typically form basic oxides and nonmetals typically form acidic oxides." And then they talk about the examples of amphoteric oxides. Acidic strength, in one part, is determined by how weak the bonds are. The weaker th...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:07 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: 12.61
Replies: 1
Views: 215

Re: 12.61

To find Ka, you have to go to the Tables 12.1 and 12.2 on pages 477 and 478. They give you the Ka and Kb of various weak acids and bases.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:05 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration for ions
Replies: 2
Views: 234

Re: Electron Configuration for ions

Fe2+ and other metals within the d-block are much harder to write the electron configuration for due to their nature. Some of them are transition metals and can have different oxidation numbers too. For the most part, focus on the s-block and p-block in order to write electron configuration and crea...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:03 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: SigFigs
Replies: 1
Views: 120

Re: SigFigs

The TAs told us (well I wasn't at the review session) not to worry about sig figs. Of course this doesn't mean write out all the numbers of the answer, but do it as many as required. And try not to round before coming to your final answer.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Dec 09, 2017 3:59 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Combining fractional roots in K expression?
Replies: 1
Views: 258

Re: Combining fractional roots in K expression?

The problem you're referring to comes from Chapter 11. From pages 439 to 440, the reading will tell you the general properties of the Equilibrium constant. The general basis is that because we divided our balanced equation by a coefficient of 1/2, our equilibrium constant will be raised to a power o...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Dec 09, 2017 3:55 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: 12.9 (c)
Replies: 1
Views: 200

Re: 12.9 (c)

Proton transfers are usually represented by the transfer of a hydrogen atom. Whether the proton of a water molecule went to a base, or when the proton of an acid went to a water molecule. In this case, there was no proton transfer, but rather an OH bond was transferred from and replaced with NH 2 . ...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Dec 09, 2017 3:53 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Kr
Replies: 3
Views: 261

Re: Kr

Krypton is a noble gas and has a complete valence shell. For it to be ionized, or to achieve ionization, it would take an insane amount of energy to remove an electron from a complete shell. It is easier for Mg to remove an electron than Krypton.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Nov 26, 2017 12:12 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 11.1 part a.
Replies: 1
Views: 105

Re: 11.1 part a.

When a reaction is in equilibrium, the reaction still happens. The idea is that rate of formation (from reactants to products) and the rate of decomposition (from products to reactants) are happening at the same rate so the concentration remains constant. It's as if you're assembling a toy from a pa...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:59 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: KC/KP/QC/QP
Replies: 2
Views: 1656

Re: KC/KP/QC/QP

K c is the equilibrium constant, referring to when the reactants and products are in terms of molarity. K p is the equilibrium constant when the products and reactants are given in terms of atm (usually when they're gases) and so it's know as the equilibrium constant of partial pressures. Q c and Q ...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:44 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Energy of Hybrid Orbitals
Replies: 4
Views: 352

Re: Energy of Hybrid Orbitals

Hybrid orbitals occur because we want to essentially form more bonds. For instance, a Carbon atom, by theory, says we can form 4 bonds because we have 4 valence electrons. However, when we take a look at the electron configuration, we can see that 2 of its electrons (in the s-orbital are already pai...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:41 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: All bond angles
Replies: 3
Views: 188

Re: All bond angles

We can't be certain of the exact bond angles of every shape of the molecules, because sometimes lone pairs affect it. So, I simply would recommend memorizing the angles of molecules where they're symmetrical or stated in the book, and memorize how lone pairs affect the angles.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:48 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Polar or non-polar molecule
Replies: 2
Views: 188

Re: Polar or non-polar molecule

It depends on the shape of the molecule. Since the electron arrangement is 4 areas of electron density, and then 4 paired atoms, then the shape of the atom is a tetrahedral. And for a tetrahedral atom, unless all the paired atoms are the same like CH 4 , then it'll most likely be polar due to the we...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:43 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Forming the hybridization
Replies: 1
Views: 121

Re: Forming the hybridization

We do not just put the superscript after the p. We sometimes put it after the d too. It depends on the atom itself. In SF 6 , the S atom forms hybrid orbitals of sp 3 d 2 . The amount of orbitals used in the structure responds to the hybridization. Since we used 6 orbitals, we have to go to s (1 orb...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Nov 11, 2017 6:01 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Beryllium Octet Rule
Replies: 6
Views: 1486

Re: Beryllium Octet Rule

Beryllium doesn't fulfill the octet rules because of its valence electrons and the orbitals they occupy. Just like H, He, Li, and Be, they are all exceptions to the octet rules mainly because they don't need 8 to feel complete. Their s-orbitals do not need 8 electrons to complete the shell to feel f...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sat Nov 11, 2017 5:51 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polar vs nonpolar vs ionic
Replies: 11
Views: 2547

Re: Polar vs nonpolar vs ionic

The polar and nonpolar is a little bit confusing to understand. Essentially, it is based on the partial charges of the compound. Based on the reading of Chapter 3, we understand that all molecules can be seen as resonance hybrids between their purely covalent bonds and purely ionic bonds. You can ea...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Nov 05, 2017 7:46 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: 3.49
Replies: 3
Views: 284

Re: 3.49

For 49, it's NO+, so in total there should be ten electrons. That means the formal charge for Nitrogen would be 5-(6/2 + 2 electrons [1 lone pair]) = 0. For oxygen, it would be 6- (6/2 +2 electrons [1 lone pairs]) = +1.

Therefore the charge for the ion is +1.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Fri Nov 03, 2017 1:51 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Midterm
Replies: 8
Views: 395

Re: Midterm

I don’t believe so. The midterm covers the fundamentals and chapter 1-3. We finished chapter 3 this Monday too I believe. VSEPR is a part of chapter 4.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:34 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron affinity versus ionization energy [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 234

Re: Electron affinity versus ionization energy [ENDORSED]

Electron Affinity is the energy that is released when an electron is added to a gas phase atom, while ionization energy is the energy needed to remove an electron from an atom. The further away an electron is from a nucleus, the easier it becomes to remove the electron. Thus, for ionization energy, ...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:26 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron Affinity [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 270

Re: Electron Affinity [ENDORSED]

I believe that if you take a look at the electron configuration you can also figure out whether or not the electron affinity will be greater than 0, less than 0, or if it becomes more negative. For instance, the EA becomes more negative moving down the Group 11 elements because n increases. Because ...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Oct 22, 2017 1:29 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Quantum Numbers [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 135

Re: Quantum Numbers [ENDORSED]

You have to find the principle quantum number first based on the row of the elements (n=1,2,3, etc) and then you can figure out the rest of the quantum numbers.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Oct 22, 2017 1:22 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration for silver [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 374

Re: Electron Configuration for silver [ENDORSED]

So I believe that since 3d has a lower energy level than 4s, we fill up the 3d orbital before the 4s orbital. Thus for Silver, we start to fill up the 5s orbital. However, on page 47 in the textbook, it states that the "half-complete subshell configuration d 5 and complete subshell configuratio...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Oct 15, 2017 5:35 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Upcoming Test
Replies: 5
Views: 325

Re: Upcoming Test

In my Discussion, my TA told me that we will be tested on material up to Chapter 1, Section 5. She said that it was unlikely that we will be tested on the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. She also said to make sure that we understand the experiments discussed in the book.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Sun Oct 15, 2017 5:19 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Question about speed of light rounding
Replies: 4
Views: 261

Re: Question about speed of light rounding

I believe is that in problem 15, they had a number of 102.6, which has 4 significant figures so they round the speed of light to 4 sig figs. Meanwhile, in problem 17, they didn't specify a number so they used the actual number of the speed of light.
by Curtis Wong 2D
Fri Oct 06, 2017 10:27 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Net Moles Produced [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 507

Re: Net Moles Produced [ENDORSED]

It just basically asks for how much the equation produced. If it's using the number of moles of equation, then it's how many gets produced in the equation (ie 1H 2 O -> 2 moles of H and 1 mole of O, giving 3 moles produced). If it's using an amount of moles, then you have to figure out the ratios fi...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Fri Oct 06, 2017 10:24 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Friday Oct 6 Test
Replies: 7
Views: 507

Re: Friday Oct 6 Test

For the problem, here's what I did. I converted all grams of the products into moles, and then used the moles of those to figure out the moles of the individual elements of Carbon and Hydrogen, because we can't figure out Oxygen due to it coming from the two sources of compound X and the Oxygen used...
by Curtis Wong 2D
Fri Oct 06, 2017 10:02 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Rounding Rule for 5
Replies: 5
Views: 454

Re: Rounding Rule for 5

The reason why we round to the nearest even number is because many different people have different ideas about rounding for numbers ending in 5. For some people, it means rounding down, for others it means rounding up. So to clear away the confusion, we just round to the nearest even number to make ...

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