Search found 68 matches

by 404975170
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:36 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: 6th edition 15.13
Replies: 1
Views: 167

Re: 6th edition 15.13

In the solutions manual they make it more difficult to see the different steps involved since they combine it all but all you have to do for part (a) is convert H2 and I2 to moles and then convert them to a molar concentration by dividing the number of moles obtained for each by the volume 0.750 L. ...
by 404975170
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:29 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: lnA
Replies: 2
Views: 63

Re: lnA

I’m pretty sure that’s the only real purpose of it because the equation is meant to be visualized on a graph.
by 404975170
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:26 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Q VS. K
Replies: 13
Views: 374

Re: Q VS. K

When Q>K think of drawing a little pac man guy off the greater than sign and his mouth is going towards the reactants so the reaction favors reactants and if Q<K draw the pac man going towards the products side so the reaction favors the formation of products. Silly tip but useful.
by 404975170
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:23 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Ka stuff
Replies: 2
Views: 189

Re: Ka stuff

If you are talking about the equation Ka= [H3O+][A-]/[HA] I don’t think it necessarily has to be memorized but if you just think about it like other problems with the equilibrium constant, K, it’s just products over reactants which you can tell from the reaction of the acid you are given.
by 404975170
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:14 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Question 9.19
Replies: 1
Views: 184

Question 9.19

In the question you are calculating the standard entropy of vaporization of water at 85 degrees C, given that it’s standard entropy of vaporization is 100 degreees C. The three steps you sum together are: 1. the entropy change heat the reactants to 100 C 2. the entropy of vaporization of h2o at 100 ...
by 404975170
Fri Mar 15, 2019 4:44 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Standard Conditions/ Standard Temperature
Replies: 2
Views: 218

Re: Standard Conditions/ Standard Temperature

25 degrees C is usually used in a lot of the problems though since this is just room temperature
by 404975170
Fri Mar 15, 2019 4:43 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Standard Conditions/ Standard Temperature
Replies: 2
Views: 218

Re: Standard Conditions/ Standard Temperature

0 degreees celsius
by 404975170
Fri Mar 15, 2019 4:31 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: coefficient in rate law
Replies: 1
Views: 36

Re: coefficient in rate law

What number is this in the book?
by 404975170
Fri Mar 15, 2019 4:24 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Test 2 help!
Replies: 3
Views: 88

Re: Test 2 help!

You use the Van’t Hoff equation to find the pH based on the information given and then you compare this pH you get to pH 7. If the pH is below 7 then pH would be basic and if it’s above 7 then a pH of 7 would be relatively acidic.
by 404975170
Fri Mar 15, 2019 4:12 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Question 8.63
Replies: 1
Views: 176

Question 8.63

This is a question finding the standard enthalpies of formation where you look at the bonds broken an formed. For part c) it says 3 mol CRC bonds are formed. What is a CRC bond? also what does it mean when it says “atomize”?
by 404975170
Thu Mar 14, 2019 11:46 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Question 15.9 Comparing Experiments
Replies: 3
Views: 209

Re: Question 15.9 Comparing Experiments

The more I look at it I think they are actually comparing experiments 1 and 3 which would then make perfect sense. If anyone can confirm this?
by 404975170
Thu Mar 14, 2019 11:38 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Question 15.9 Comparing Experiments
Replies: 3
Views: 209

Question 15.9 Comparing Experiments

For Question 15.9, I understand how to find the order of A you compare the experiments where the values are the same for [B] and [C] but different for [A] but I don’t get when you are trying to find the order of [B] how to correctly decide which experiments to compare? The book compared experiments ...
by 404975170
Sun Mar 10, 2019 10:05 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Arrhenius plot
Replies: 4
Views: 68

Re: Arrhenius plot

It allows us to analyze the effect of temperature on the rates of chemical reactions
by 404975170
Sun Mar 10, 2019 9:53 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Unique Rate of a Reaction
Replies: 2
Views: 41

Unique Rate of a Reaction

Can someone please clarify the unique rate of reaction specifically for question 15.3 part c?
by 404975170
Sun Mar 10, 2019 9:50 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Rate vs. Initial Rate
Replies: 4
Views: 239

Rate vs. Initial Rate

What is the difference in solving a problem that asks for the initial rate vs. one that just ask to find the rate?
by 404975170
Thu Feb 28, 2019 8:14 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: 14.9 ch 14
Replies: 3
Views: 61

Re: 14.9 ch 14

Okay so I just realized the cell potential for Cu is given so then you just plug in:
-0.689 V=E(cathode)-(0.34V)
to get the reduction potential of the anode
by 404975170
Thu Feb 28, 2019 8:06 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: 14.9 ch 14
Replies: 3
Views: 61

Re: 14.9 ch 14

The Question is: A student was given a standard Cu(s)| Cu^2+ (aq) half-cell and another half-cell containing an unknown metal M immersed in 1.00 M M(NO3)2 (aq). When the copper was connected as the anode at 25C, the cell potential was found to be -0.689 V. What is the reduction potential for the unk...
by 404975170
Mon Feb 18, 2019 6:56 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: vant hoff
Replies: 2
Views: 67

Re: vant hoff

Gibbs free energy changes with the temperature and pressure of the thermodynamic system. So the point of the van 't Hoff equation is that it relates the change in Keq to the change in temperature, T, when you are given delta H at a constant temperature.
by 404975170
Sun Feb 10, 2019 10:16 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Heat as path function
Replies: 3
Views: 73

Re: Heat as path function

q is not a state function because the energy transferred depends on the path chosen
by 404975170
Sun Feb 10, 2019 10:12 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Isothermal meaning
Replies: 4
Views: 105

Re: Isothermal meaning

ΔT = 0 so the ΔU = 0 ( for an ideal gas) but Q ≠ 0,
the opposite would be an adiabatic process, ΔT ≠ 0 but Q =0
by 404975170
Sun Feb 10, 2019 10:06 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Entropy of the Universe
Replies: 1
Views: 46

Re: Entropy of the Universe

The second law of thermodynamics states that the total entropy of the universe always increases for a spontaneous process.
by 404975170
Sun Feb 03, 2019 11:00 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Internal Energy of Ideal Gas
Replies: 1
Views: 46

Internal Energy of Ideal Gas

I know the equation is U=3/2nRT but in one of the homework problems another equation with U=5/2nRT is mentioned. Does anyone know what the purpose of this second equation is for?
by 404975170
Sun Feb 03, 2019 10:49 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Different types of pressure
Replies: 1
Views: 42

Re: Different types of pressure

They are given on the constants and formulas sheet so no, just need to know how to correctly apply them.
by 404975170
Sun Feb 03, 2019 10:42 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: L*atm
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Re: L*atm

It is on the constants and formulas sheet from our last quiz so it would be given to us.
by 404975170
Sun Jan 27, 2019 10:50 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: ICE Box Ratios
Replies: 8
Views: 277

Re: ICE Box Ratios

basically think of it as x is negative for the reactants because these are being used up to form the positive products
by 404975170
Sun Jan 27, 2019 10:48 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Delta Hº versus delta H
Replies: 7
Views: 194

Re: Delta Hº versus delta H

I believe they are the same.
by 404975170
Sun Jan 27, 2019 10:45 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: When to use Quadratic equation
Replies: 10
Views: 372

Re: When to use Quadratic equation

You use the quadratic equation when u have an x^2 when you set up the equilibrium constant equation. Sometimes you have just an x so you wouldn’t need to do a quadratic you could just solve.
by 404975170
Sun Jan 27, 2019 10:44 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: How Le Chat's Principle is Applied
Replies: 2
Views: 56

Re: How Le Chat's Principle is Applied

Basically this principle says that if a gas is added or other constraint than the equilibrium shifts to counterbalance the effect applied
by 404975170
Sun Jan 20, 2019 11:00 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: OH and H3O
Replies: 10
Views: 383

Re: OH and H3O

When looking at a recation, if the number of hydrogens has decreased when going from reactants to products then the substance is an acid (donates hydrogen ions). If the number of hydrogens increases from reactants to products then that substance is the base (accepts hydrogen ions).
by 404975170
Sun Jan 20, 2019 10:50 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Q VS. K
Replies: 13
Views: 374

Re: Q VS. K

Q changes as the reaction of the system approaches equilibrium versus K that is the numerical value of Q at the "end" of the reaction, when equilibrium is reached. They are the same calculation but different significances.
by 404975170
Sun Jan 20, 2019 10:39 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: 5%
Replies: 5
Views: 98

Re: 5%

You compare the disassociation of the conjugate acid to the conjugate base or vice verse by putting the concentration of the product for example conjugate acid over the concentration of its reactant concentration base times 100%. The picture shows how it is applied for the problem I did at the bottom.
by 404975170
Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:02 am
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: K and Q [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 120

Re: K and Q [ENDORSED]

K is the equilibrium constant and Q is the reaction quotient. K is used when the system is equilibrium and Q is used when the system is not in equilibrium. You can compare K and Q to find out which direction the reaction will proceed.
by 404975170
Sun Jan 13, 2019 11:58 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Change in ICE tables
Replies: 1
Views: 44

Change in ICE tables

Will the reactants always have a negative when doing the c for your ice tables?
by 404975170
Sun Jan 13, 2019 11:57 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Question 11.7 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 67

Question 11.7 [ENDORSED]

For part a how can you tell which flask is at equilibrium? I know the answer is flask 3 but I just don’t know how to reach this conclusion.
by 404975170
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:59 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Homework Question 4.73
Replies: 1
Views: 167

Homework Question 4.73

For Question 4.73, how do lone pairs affect bond angles? Specifically when comparing CH2^2- and CH3^- since they are both less than 109.5 degrees but CH3^- is slightly bigger.
by 404975170
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:54 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Homework Question 4.25
Replies: 2
Views: 201

Homework Question 4.25

I’m still struggling with distinguishing if the atom is polar or nonpolar. Judging off of the answers to Question 4.25 is the best way to distinguish if it is polar or nonpolar to see if the Lewis structure looks symmetrical and if so it’s nonpolar and if the Lewis structure isn’t then it polar or i...
by 404975170
Sun Jun 10, 2018 12:22 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hibridization
Replies: 3
Views: 217

Re: Hibridization

To find hybridization you must determine the number of regions of electron density present. A region of electron density is either a pair of lone pair electrons or a bond (every single, double and triple bonds just counts as one region). The number of regions correspond to a hybrid orbital (s, sp, s...
by 404975170
Sun Jun 10, 2018 12:19 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Sunday Step-Up Session
Replies: 2
Views: 176

Sunday Step-Up Session

Will there still be the Step-Up Session from 5-7 tonight in Hedrick Hall?
by 404975170
Wed Jun 06, 2018 2:24 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: pH calculations on Final
Replies: 2
Views: 259

pH calculations on Final

Will we have to do pH calculations on the final using the -log equation based on a concentration we are given? I know there are homework questions concerning calculations but we some UA’s have said there will be calculations on the final while others have said not to worry about it.
by 404975170
Wed Jun 06, 2018 2:18 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Pi bonds in triple bond
Replies: 17
Views: 440

Re: Pi bonds in triple bond

one sigma and two pi bonds
by 404975170
Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:10 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybrid orbitals
Replies: 6
Views: 242

Re: Hybrid orbitals

A region of electron density is either a pair of lone pair electrons or a bond (every single, double and triple bonds just counts as one region). The number of regions correspond to a hybrid orbital (s, sp, sp2 etc.) 1 region - s 2 regions- sp 3 regions- sp2 4 regions- sp3 5 regions- sp3d 6 regions-...
by 404975170
Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:59 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Sigma Bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 174

Re: Sigma Bonds

Every bond has a sigma bond. A single bond has one sigma bond. A double bond has one sigma and one pi bond. A triple bond has one sigma and two pi bonds. They are the strongest type of covalent bond. Basically, it is a more specific way to classify bonds and occurs from the overlapping of orbitals.
by 404975170
Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:54 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Ligand terms
Replies: 2
Views: 107

Re: Ligand terms

It’s a way to further classify ligands by identifying how many sites the central atom binds to.
by 404975170
Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:50 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma and Pi bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 247

Re: Sigma and Pi bonds

I’m guessing that there would be an arrow pointing to a bond and you would have to identify the type or it would ask how many total pi and sigma bonds there are in a Lewis structure that we would be given a picture of.
by 404975170
Sun May 20, 2018 6:59 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Which charge is more favorable?
Replies: 2
Views: 187

Which charge is more favorable?

Between these two drawings of Lewis Structures, would it be more favorable to draw the structure so that there is a -1 charge on 2 of the O's and a 0 formal charge on the central atom, S or would it be better for all the O's to have a FC of 0 and then S to have a charge of -2? I’m not sure if there ...
by 404975170
Sun May 20, 2018 6:31 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: 3.59
Replies: 1
Views: 95

Re: 3.59

I’m guessing you are referring to part (a) of 3.59 ? because that is the only one without a full octet but this is because it's not possible to have a full octet on one of the elements since ClO is radical since there is an odd number of total valence electrons for ClO since Cl has 7 valence electro...
by 404975170
Mon May 14, 2018 12:12 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Formal Energies [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 108

Re: Formal Energies [ENDORSED]

Formal energy aka formal charge is the difference between the number of valence electrons on the free atom minus number of valence electrons assigned to the atom in the molecule. It tells you how reactive the atom is and also it helps you see if you drew your Lewis structure correct because you can ...
by 404975170
Mon May 14, 2018 12:00 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Octet Rule [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 150

Re: Octet Rule [ENDORSED]

I do not know all the exceptions but elements containing d-orbitals can hold more electrons than the octet rule.
P can hold up to 10 electrons.
S can hold up to 12 electrons.
B, Al- 6 electrons.
by 404975170
Sun May 13, 2018 11:22 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: octet explanation [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 107

Re: octet explanation [ENDORSED]

This just means that they fill the octet for however many valence electrons they require without going over so if an element only has four valence electrons than this is "as far" as it can go towards completing the octet.
by 404975170
Sun May 13, 2018 10:12 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: VALENCE ELECTRONS [ENDORSED]
Replies: 16
Views: 488

Re: VALENCE ELECTRONS [ENDORSED]

You just look at the periodic table and count what position the element is in in the row (excluding d block). For example: Oxygen has 6 valence electrons and Flourine has 7 and Carbon has 4 valence electrons.
by 404975170
Mon May 07, 2018 1:27 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Across vs Down Trend
Replies: 2
Views: 125

Re: Across vs Down Trend

As you move across the period the atomic radius gets smaller and as you move down the column the radius gets bigger. So silver has a larger atomic radius than zinc. This is because when you add a proton, then the nucleus pulls the electrons in stronger, pulling the atoms cell close to the nucleus. S...
by 404975170
Sun May 06, 2018 11:51 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Minimum indeterminacy
Replies: 1
Views: 127

Re: Minimum indeterminacy

In the Heisenberg equation you are solving for the uncertainty (indeterminacy) in position, mass, or volume based on the information the question gives you and you solve to find the amount for the variable that is equal to or just above the amount h/4(pi) so it doesn't make sense to solve for the ma...
by 404975170
Sun May 06, 2018 10:54 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Special Cases [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 147

Re: Special Cases [ENDORSED]

There is no way to tell from just looking at the periodic table because they have been found to be exceptions through experimentation. The only ones I believe that we need to know for the test are Cu and Cr like Dr. Lavelle said, it is also easy to remember that Gold and Silver are too.
by 404975170
Sun May 06, 2018 10:42 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: #9 on Midterm Practice Review (unicorn)
Replies: 4
Views: 281

Re: #9 on Midterm Practice Review (unicorn)

It is usually always best to automatically convert to L in most problems when you see mL since this is the unit the answer needs to be in for most problems. This question does not specify the units the answer has to be in so since the question gives the volume in mL it is just easier to find the ans...
by 404975170
Sun Apr 29, 2018 11:06 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Radius
Replies: 3
Views: 105

Re: Radius

The size of an atom changes depending on the size of the nucleus and how much energy each electron has. An element’s location on the periodic table affects the size, thus the radius changes so if you were to calculate the energy of the electrons you would know that the radius has changed.
by 404975170
Sun Apr 29, 2018 10:59 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Schrodinger equation definition?
Replies: 3
Views: 175

Re: Schrodinger equation definition?

The Schrondinger equation basically helps us find the equation's wave function. Once we know this then we can find the quantum numbers and shapes of the orbitals that characterize electrons.
by 404975170
Sun Apr 29, 2018 10:46 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: s, p, d, f
Replies: 16
Views: 401

Re: s, p, d, f

Each orbital in a su shell has a different shape characterized by a different letter (s, p, d,f). They have electrons with different angular momentums so this sets them apart from each other.
by 404975170
Sun Apr 22, 2018 12:23 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Energy spectrum
Replies: 4
Views: 142

Re: Energy spectrum

This is because the Bohr model only works with hydrogen. It does not correspond to other energy levels, so these other energy have different properties than the first. Since hydrogen atoms have only one electron, they contains a large number of shells, thus when one electron jumps from one shell to ...
by 404975170
Sun Apr 22, 2018 10:47 am
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Calculating energy [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 132

Re: Calculating energy [ENDORSED]

Since you are given the wavelength you can solve for the frequency since the c in this equation is a constant c=(wavelength)(frequency). Then the Energy equation is E=h*(frequency). Since you just found frequency and h is a constant then you can solve for the energy. Or you can simply just use the e...
by 404975170
Sun Apr 22, 2018 2:54 am
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Wavelike Properties [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 112

Re: Wavelike Properties [ENDORSED]

If you were to look for the de Brogolie wavelength of a macroscopic object it would be tiny since in this equation h, Planck's constant is already very small and then then macroscopic object's mass which would be m is way bigger than the mass of particles that de Brogolie's equation usually deals wi...
by 404975170
Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:39 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Name of a Compound
Replies: 2
Views: 202

Re: Name of a Compound

I’m sure on tests he will give us the names to complex compounds but I think this really just comes with practice and the more you become familiar with different compounds. If you have some knowledge of the compound you could know that sodium Na bicarbonate is CO3 and there is also an H so it’s NaHC...
by 404975170
Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:27 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Speed of light constant
Replies: 5
Views: 183

Re: Speed of light constant

this is the speed of light in a vacuum so this constant is wavelength x frequency
by 404975170
Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:23 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Avogadro #
Replies: 9
Views: 432

Re: Avogadro #

Avogadro‘s # is the number of particles, atoms or molecules that are in one mole. It can be applied when you have an amount given for moles and the question asks for it in atoms so you use dimensional analysis to convert values.
by 404975170
Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:17 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Quanta vs. Photon [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 152

Re: Quanta vs. Photon [ENDORSED]

Quanta are discrete bundles in which radiation and other forms of energy occur and light is sent out in the different ‘amounts’ (quanta) that called photons.
by 404975170
Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:09 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Intensity
Replies: 1
Views: 87

Re: Intensity

I=E/tA
where I is intensity, E is energy, t is time, A is area of the radiation

The reason to find the intensity of radiation is because a surface has different intensities depending on the different direction the surface is hit.
by 404975170
Sun Apr 15, 2018 10:58 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Isotopes [ENDORSED]
Replies: 12
Views: 399

Re: Isotopes [ENDORSED]

Basically a simple way to think about isotopes are that within the same element there are atoms that have a different number of neutrons but same number of protons. So the atomic mass within different isotopes changes.

(IsoTopes) T for Top meaning the top number (atomic mass changes)
by 404975170
Thu Oct 05, 2017 8:18 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs- Addition and Subtraction [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 352

Sig Figs- Addition and Subtraction [ENDORSED]

In Appendix 1C there is a rule that says to "make sure that the number of decimal places in the result is the same as the smallest number of decimal places in the data." How does this work if one of the numbers you are adding does not have decimal places? For example: 12+ 0.123=
by 404975170
Thu Oct 05, 2017 8:13 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Integers and Exact Numbers- Sig Figs [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 364

Integers and Exact Numbers- Sig Figs [ENDORSED]

Can someone clarify what it means in Appendix 1C when it says "In multiplication and division by an interger or an exact number, the uncertainty of the result is determined by the measured value."?

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