Search found 50 matches

by Peri Bingham 1G
Mon Mar 12, 2018 12:51 pm
Forum: *Enzyme Kinetics
Topic: Catalysts
Replies: 11
Views: 557

Re: Catalysts

Since the catalysts increase the rates of the forward and reverse reactions equally, equilibrium composition is not changed but is just reached faster.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Mon Mar 12, 2018 12:44 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: NOT doing direct computation?
Replies: 1
Views: 88

Re: NOT doing direct computation?

No. I believe we only need to use the pre-equilibrium approach.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Mon Mar 12, 2018 12:40 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Intermediate
Replies: 6
Views: 229

Re: Intermediate

An intermediate is neither a reactant or a product. It is formed by the reactants in one step, and then reacts to form the products in another step.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Tue Mar 06, 2018 10:33 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Increasing Concentration of Reactants
Replies: 5
Views: 305

Re: Increasing Concentration of Reactants

Since concentration and rate are directly proportional, an increase (or decrease) in the concentration will cause an increase (or decrease) in the rate.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Tue Mar 06, 2018 10:20 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: Units of k
Replies: 12
Views: 685

Re: Units of k

Units of the rate are almost always mol/L*s and units of concentration are almost alway mol/L. Therefore the units of k can be determined based on the reaction order and the already determined units.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:50 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Units for Time
Replies: 2
Views: 93

Re: Units for Time

In this question, the time units are actually given. The units are 1/L*h.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Tue Feb 27, 2018 10:05 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Unique Average Rate vs. Average Rate
Replies: 3
Views: 154

Re: Unique Average Rate vs. Average Rate

The unique average rate of change is essentially the average rate of change divided by the stoichiometric coefficient.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Tue Feb 27, 2018 10:02 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Elementary Reactions
Replies: 4
Views: 173

Re: Elementary Reactions

An elementary reaction is the individual step in a reaction mechanism.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Tue Feb 27, 2018 9:59 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Difference between 1st and 2nd order reactions
Replies: 3
Views: 7447

Re: Difference between 1st and 2nd order reactions

In first order reactions, the rate is proportional to the concentration raised to the first power. In second order reactions, the rate is proportional to the concentration raised to the second power.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sat Feb 24, 2018 11:54 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: reducing power?
Replies: 5
Views: 232

Re: reducing power?

Reducing agents have lower standard potential. The lower the standard potential, the greater the reducing strength.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sat Feb 24, 2018 11:51 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: Concept of Zero Order
Replies: 5
Views: 375

Re: Concept of Zero Order

A zero order reaction is one in which the rate is independent of the reactant concentration. An example is the catalyzed decomposition of ammonia.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sat Feb 24, 2018 11:49 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: n
Replies: 8
Views: 275

Re: n

The order of reactants is the sum of the powers that individual concentrations in a reaction's rate law are raised to.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Feb 18, 2018 8:58 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Order in Cell Diagrams
Replies: 4
Views: 152

Re: Order in Cell Diagrams

I do not believe that the phase order matters. Just remember that the anode is on the left of the salt bridge and the cathode is on the right.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Feb 18, 2018 8:49 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Nernst Equation
Replies: 4
Views: 229

Re: Nernst Equation

It lets us calculate the voltage of any concentration of reactants and products.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Fri Feb 16, 2018 10:48 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Oxidizing vs. Reducing Agent
Replies: 7
Views: 241

Re: Oxidizing vs. Reducing Agent

The oxidizing agent is reduced in the process of bringing about oxidation. The reducing agent is oxidized in the process of bringing about reduction.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Feb 11, 2018 11:23 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Third Law's W
Replies: 3
Views: 161

Re: Third Law's W

W refers to degeneracy and is calculated by raising the number of possible states to the number to atoms/molecules.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Feb 11, 2018 11:07 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Midterm 2018W [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 181

Re: Midterm 2018W [ENDORSED]

Yes, there is still lecture on Wednesday.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Feb 11, 2018 10:50 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Entropy
Replies: 6
Views: 261

Re: Entropy

Being more vibrationally active causes a larger value of entropy. The larger or more complex the molecule, the larger the vibrational activity.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Feb 04, 2018 6:22 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: 9.19
Replies: 2
Views: 98

Re: 9.19

The problem says to use the molar heat capacities at standard pressure and provides them as well.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Feb 04, 2018 6:12 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Calculating work of expansion on the exam
Replies: 2
Views: 115

Re: Calculating work of expansion on the exam

I believe that the integrals are only used to show the derivations of the equations. Therefore, I do not think we would be expected to do any calculations with integrals on exams. Also, we are allowed to use calculators on exams but only if they are scientific ones.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Feb 04, 2018 6:09 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Test Number 1
Replies: 9
Views: 339

Re: Test Number 1

Heat transfer does not necessarily imply that there is a change in temperature. The heat transfer is due to the work being done by the system.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Jan 28, 2018 8:22 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: 8.49
Replies: 2
Views: 116

Re: 8.49

I believe you used the wrong gas constant (R). Use R = 8.314 J/molK.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Jan 28, 2018 8:17 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: In which situation does delta U=0 and that q=-w
Replies: 4
Views: 156

Re: In which situation does delta U=0 and that q=-w

The situation would be an isothermal (constant temperature) reversible expansion.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Jan 28, 2018 8:14 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Question from test?
Replies: 4
Views: 198

Re: Question from test?

This would be a closed system since only energy (keeping the food cold) is transferred and no matter is transferred.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:06 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: bond enthalpies
Replies: 3
Views: 170

Re: bond enthalpies

To convert the bond enthalpies into a gas, you must add the enthalpy of vaporization (if going from liquid to gas) or the enthalpy of sublimation (if going from solid to gas).
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:03 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Test 1 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 331

Re: Test 1 [ENDORSED]

All of the equations that we have covered in lecture, with the exception of work and internal energy equations, are fair game for test 1.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:00 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Isolated vs Closed system
Replies: 3
Views: 226

Re: Isolated vs Closed system

A closed system is one where only energy can be transferred. For example, a pot with a lid on it is a closed system. An isolated system is one where nothing can be transferred. A thermos is an example of an isolated system.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Jan 14, 2018 9:47 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Standard Enthalpy Formation
Replies: 2
Views: 100

Re: Standard Enthalpy Formation

Standard enthalpy of formation is 0 in their most stable forms because it is how the elements naturally occur. However, the enthalpy of formation of the same element in a form that is not its most stable one is not zero. For example, carbon's most stable form is graphite and the enthalpy of formatio...
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Jan 14, 2018 9:14 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: kJ vs. kJ/mol
Replies: 3
Views: 428

Re: kJ vs. kJ/mol

For the standard enthalpy of formation, the units are always kJ/mol.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Sun Jan 14, 2018 9:06 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Recording Lectures
Replies: 2
Views: 187

Re: Recording Lectures

He hasn't specified that it isn't allowed. However, I usually take pictures of slides instead of a video if I'm concerned I won't be able to copy information down fast enough.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:07 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Final-- Examples
Replies: 2
Views: 336

Re: Final-- Examples

Remember to review the tables and boxes stated on the syllabus. Those are ones we are expected to know and are fair game for tests and exams. To test yourself on your knowledge of them, maybe create a set of flashcards.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:01 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Oxides
Replies: 2
Views: 278

Re: Oxides

The elements that are classified as amphoteric when they form oxides are Be, Al, Ga, Sn, Sb, and Pb.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:59 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Ch 4 Question 75
Replies: 3
Views: 240

Re: Ch 4 Question 75

Also, in general, remember that sometimes when the bonds are polar, the whole molecule is not necessarily polar because of cancellation of polarity.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:55 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Superscript
Replies: 3
Views: 234

Re: Superscript

Also, remember that the number of hybrid orbitals (the sum of the subscripts) is equal to the number of regions of electron density.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Tue Nov 21, 2017 6:47 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Cation & Anion Polarity
Replies: 3
Views: 547

Re: Cation & Anion Polarity

In smaller cations, the positively charged nucleus is closer to the outer shell. Therefore it has more power (polarizing power) to draw in an anion and distort it. In large anions, the positively charged nucleus is farther from the outer shell. There for it has less power (easily polarizable) to kee...
by Peri Bingham 1G
Tue Nov 21, 2017 6:36 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Best way to start Lewis Structures
Replies: 12
Views: 511

Re: Best way to start Lewis Structures

I do a guess and check method essentially. I draw the central atom and connect all the atoms to the central atom with a bond and then add electrons until all atoms have 8 electrons. Then I figure out the formal charge and move around atoms and bonds and keep checking the formal charge until I believ...
by Peri Bingham 1G
Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:48 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge on each atom
Replies: 4
Views: 483

Re: Formal Charge on each atom

An easier way to determine formal charge is to count each dot (electron) as 1 and each bond as 1. Add up the number of dots and bonds on an atom and subtract that from the atom's number of valence electrons. That will determine the formal charge of the atom.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:44 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electroegativity
Replies: 9
Views: 510

Re: Electroegativity

If you happened to know the exact electronegativity values of the two elements that you are comparing, then you would not need to use the trend. However, if you do not know the values, then the trend is very helpful.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Mon Nov 06, 2017 11:04 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Beryllium and Lithium
Replies: 2
Views: 153

Re: Beryllium and Lithium

Instead of forming an octet, beryllium and lithium form a duplet.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Mon Nov 06, 2017 10:37 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Radicals
Replies: 4
Views: 304

Re: Radicals

A radical is a compound with an unpaired electron. It tends to be highly reactive and only exists for a short time. An example of a radical is CH3.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Mon Oct 30, 2017 1:29 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Lewis Structure [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 155

Re: Lewis Structure [ENDORSED]

Bond length and bond strength are inversely proportional. Therefore, a single bond has a longer bond length but is weaker in terms of bond strength. A triple bond has a shorter bond length, but is stronger in terms of bond strength.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Mon Oct 30, 2017 1:24 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Sulfate Ion
Replies: 4
Views: 205

Re: Sulfate Ion

Atoms in period 3 or higher, like sulfur, can have more than 8 valence electrons because they can occupy the d-orbitals.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:53 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: 2.1 part d
Replies: 4
Views: 191

Re: 2.1 part d

Yes and no. It depends on how you are looking at the periodic table. If you go down the periodic table, then yes, there is a direct relationship. As the value of n increases, the radius and the number of electrons both increase because there addition of a new shell, because of the addition of electr...
by Peri Bingham 1G
Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:48 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: The uncertainty principle [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 420

Re: The uncertainty principle [ENDORSED]

All matter is affected by outside forces. However, bigger objects, such as baseballs, are not as affected by the impact of a photon as are smaller objects, such as electrons. Therefore, it is easier to see the impact and therefore the uncertainty on smaller objects, like subatomic particles, because...
by Peri Bingham 1G
Mon Oct 16, 2017 9:08 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Homework Week 3
Replies: 3
Views: 202

Re: Homework Week 3

Since we have Test 2 in our discussion sections this week, I assuming you would only need to do homework that corresponds with the material on Test 2 (problems 3-41). Week 4 is probably when Chapter 2 problems will be expected.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:53 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Test 1 Compound X [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 393

Re: Test 1 Compound X [ENDORSED]

Section M of the Fundamentals (specifically M.3) talks about this type of problem (combustion analysis). Problem M.19 is a good example of this type of problem if you want more practice with it for the midterm and final. Also, because it is an odd problem, the solution is in the workbook so that way...
by Peri Bingham 1G
Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:21 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Conversions
Replies: 3
Views: 196

Re: Conversions

When doing problems (generally wavelength) where I get my answer in terms of m and want to convert it into nm, I take my answer (in m) and multiply it by 10^9 and then my answer will be in terms of nm. The chart from lecture that listed the common prefixes and their symbols and meanings is super hel...
by Peri Bingham 1G
Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:14 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Prefix Conversion
Replies: 12
Views: 546

Re: Prefix Conversion

I prefer to convert my units in the beginning based on the questions and the formulas being used in the question. At the end of the problem, I make sure that my answer is in the proper units which may involve more converting. In this chapter, I tend to see myself doing this a lot in regards to wavel...
by Peri Bingham 1G
Thu Oct 05, 2017 10:53 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Combustion Analysis
Replies: 5
Views: 312

Re: Combustion Analysis

The elements should be given in the problem. A good example of this kinda of in the textbook is problem M.19 in the fundamentals section. It indirectly lists which elements are in the sample based on the products of the reactions.
by Peri Bingham 1G
Thu Oct 05, 2017 10:48 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Formula Units
Replies: 7
Views: 359

Re: Formula Units

Formula units can apply to both ionic and covalent (network solid) compounds.

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