Search found 20 matches

by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sat Dec 09, 2017 9:04 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: delocalized pi bond
Replies: 5
Views: 1148

Re: delocalized pi bond

Delocalized electrons are electrons in a molecule, ion or solid metal that are not associated with a single atom or a covalent bond. You will know if it is delocalized based on whether if it it is a resonance structure.
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sat Dec 09, 2017 9:02 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Lewis acids and bases
Replies: 2
Views: 166

Re: Lewis acids and bases

Acids and Bases will most likely be a big portion of a test because it is the only thing that we have been taught but haven't been tested on. Some things you should know is how to solve an ICE table in regards to acids and bases, how to find pH and pOH, conjugate acids and bases, and many more thing...
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:58 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Kp to Kc unit conversion
Replies: 1
Views: 264

Re: Kp to Kc unit conversion

It is unlikely that this will be asked on the final, but if it is you would use PV=nRT to get the answer.
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Mon Dec 04, 2017 12:41 am
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Ionic Equation
Replies: 3
Views: 628

Ionic Equation

When writing the ionic equation, how does one know which molecules get split and which do not. For instance, why is (COOH) or H2O not split into different parts but NaOH is?
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Tue Nov 28, 2017 10:46 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Oxalate
Replies: 1
Views: 115

Oxalate

When being asked for the formula for oxalate, when can we write "ox" and when can we write "C2O4"?
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sun Nov 26, 2017 3:52 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: (CO3)2- polydentate ligand
Replies: 1
Views: 135

(CO3)2- polydentate ligand

How come for (CO3)2-, this is either monodentate or bidentate? When do we know, which type of polydentate it is going to be?
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sun Nov 26, 2017 3:50 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: 17.33
Replies: 4
Views: 359

Re: 17.33

a) Tridentate ligand: This is because there are three Nitrogens in this structure that each have a lone pair. No other atoms have a lone pair. b) Mono or bidentate Ligand: This is because CO3 can bind to one or two oxygen atoms. c) Monodenate ligand: Even through oxygen has two lone pairs, the metal...
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sun Nov 19, 2017 3:53 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Pi Bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 247

Pi Bonds

Do pi bonds only occur when there is a double or triple bond?
And if so, what is the reasoning for this? Like what makes this a pi bond and not a double sigma bond?
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sun Nov 19, 2017 3:45 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Equatorial vs Axial [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 202

Equatorial vs Axial [ENDORSED]

I am confused on what the terms equatorial and axial mean and how they refer to the structure of the molecule.
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sun Nov 12, 2017 5:20 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angles
Replies: 3
Views: 191

Bond Angles

Why is it that some bond angles are not an exact number, but instead are "slightly less" than a certain example. For instance, why is O3's bond angle slightly less than 120 degrees rather than just 120 degrees?
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sun Nov 12, 2017 5:17 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Tetrahedral vs Trigonal Pyramid
Replies: 2
Views: 224

Tetrahedral vs Trigonal Pyramid

I am confused as to when a Lewis Structure is identified as Tetrahedral or Trigonal Pyramid. Both have 4 bonds/lone pairs so how is one to know which is which?
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sun Nov 05, 2017 7:13 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 3.57
Replies: 2
Views: 148

Re: 3.57

For this midterm that we take we will not need to know the scientific names and will be given the molecular compounds. However, we will need to know the names of molecular compounds later on.
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sun Nov 05, 2017 7:09 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 3.41 part c
Replies: 2
Views: 145

Re: 3.41 part c

When solving this, just make sure to keep the elements in the parenthesis (NH2) together and to put the two Carbon atoms in the center of the structure. By using these "rules", you should be able to use the normal rules of Lewis structures to find this Lewis structure. (PS there will be no...
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sat Oct 28, 2017 5:28 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Post-Module Question #20 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 237

Re: Post-Module Question #20 [ENDORSED]

Kinetic Energy = (1/2)(9.109x10^-31 kg)(3.4x10^10)^2
= 5.3 x 10^-10 J/e
(5.3x10^-10) x (6.022 x 10^23) = 3.2 x 10^14 J/mol
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sat Oct 28, 2017 5:13 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 435

Re: Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds [ENDORSED]

When drawing Lewis structures of ionic bonds on an exam, do you think would we lose points for not having a plus or minus in the top right corner like Lavelle had in class even if we have the right dot structure? I believe you would be marked down for not including the plus or minus sign because wi...
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Sun Oct 22, 2017 1:20 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Should velocity always be in m.s. when solving? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 11
Views: 824

Re: Should velocity always be in m.s. when solving? [ENDORSED]

Velocity itself is measure in meters per second. Therefore, one should typically convert all values of velocity to meters per second to solve an equation.
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Tue Oct 10, 2017 6:50 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Accuracy vs Precision [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 1226

Re: Accuracy vs Precision [ENDORSED]

In simple terms, having a high accuracy is when you get near the desired point consistently. Having a high precision means you get the same results consistently, but it does not have to be near the desired point.
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Tue Oct 10, 2017 6:45 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs- Addition and Subtraction [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 350

Re: Sig Figs- Addition and Subtraction [ENDORSED]

When adding and subtracting with sig figs, your final answer must be in the least amount of sig figs. For instance, if it is 9.9 -4.442, the answer would be 5.5 because 9.9 has the least amount of sig figs.
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Wed Oct 04, 2017 6:32 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Fundamentals M.19
Replies: 2
Views: 512

Re: Fundamentals M.19

First, you need to find the amount of moles in each element. Because the question gives you only the grams of molecules you need to break the molecule down. With the case of CO2, you would break it down to find C. (You would break down Oxygen last because oxygen is also found in H2O.) To break CO2 d...
by Tylor McGrew 1J
Wed Oct 04, 2017 6:21 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Balancing Process
Replies: 11
Views: 477

Re: Balancing Process

There really is no strict rule to follow when choosing an element to balance first, but like Dr. Lavelle stated, the elements with the least amount of moles are the easiest way to start. In this case, since there are 2 elements with the same amount of moles, I would start with the phosphorous becaus...

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