Search found 74 matches

by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sat Mar 17, 2018 4:12 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: wmax
Replies: 4
Views: 297

Re: wmax

I think it is just delta G, but that being said, wmax=deltaG when pressure and temperature are constant.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sat Mar 17, 2018 4:06 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Reversible reactions
Replies: 1
Views: 209

Re: Reversible reactions

If you are referring to reversible expansion, in our case, almost always will reversible reactions be isothermal. Usually tests and problems state them together.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sat Mar 17, 2018 4:04 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Writing Cell Diagrams
Replies: 2
Views: 113

Re: Writing Cell Diagrams

On the anode side, write the element that is getting reduced first, then its reduced state. On the cathode side, write the element getting oxidized, and then its oxidized state.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Thu Mar 15, 2018 7:35 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Heat curve
Replies: 2
Views: 232

Re: Heat curve

Conceptually, if a metal has a lower specific heat, it should take less time to get to the same temperature as a metal with a higher one, giving it a steeper slope.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Thu Mar 15, 2018 7:30 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: 9.101 (b)
Replies: 2
Views: 189

Re: 9.101 (b)

a. The entropy of the inside is increasing due to the fact that heat is getting pumped into the system. The entropy of the outside is decreasing as it is losing heat. The inside change is greater due to higher change in temperature (the outside does not change in temperature by much).
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Mar 07, 2018 9:19 am
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Pseudo First Order Reactions
Replies: 2
Views: 135

Re: Pseudo First Order Reactions

I would think they would give you details about using a pseudo first order.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Mon Mar 05, 2018 2:36 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: 3rd order, 4th order, etc.
Replies: 5
Views: 307

Re: 3rd order, 4th order, etc.

Seeing as it hasn't been covered too in depth in lecture, I would not think we need to know the half lives.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Mon Mar 05, 2018 2:34 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Catalyst in a Equilibria
Replies: 2
Views: 114

Catalyst in a Equilibria

If you apply a catalyst to a system that has both a forward and a reverse reaction, does the catalyst have an effect on the activation energy for both sides?
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Mon Mar 05, 2018 2:29 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Which Step is Slower?
Replies: 8
Views: 231

Re: Which Step is Slower?

Many times, a problem will give you mechanisms, and in turn tell you explicitly which step is the slow mechanism.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Mon Mar 05, 2018 2:28 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Order?
Replies: 3
Views: 140

Re: Order?

To elaborate, essentially if you take two experiments and only change one initial concentration of reactant, you can observe how the rate of the rxn is affected, thus determining the order in respect to the reactant you altered.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 25, 2018 9:05 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Rate Constants
Replies: 4
Views: 209

Re: Rate Constants

You could also relate this to our delta g equation last chapter as the higher the temperature is with a positive delta s, the more favorable a reaction is.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 25, 2018 9:03 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Initial Rates
Replies: 3
Views: 170

Re: Initial Rates

I am pretty sure I heard lavelle reference that we would learn that at a later date.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 25, 2018 9:02 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 14.13 part d
Replies: 2
Views: 117

Re: 14.13 part d

Au becomes a reactant because you flip the anode half reaction.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 18, 2018 9:02 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Open System
Replies: 5
Views: 341

Re: Open System

A good way to remember is that an open system is 'open to the surrounding' meaning the system is able to lose some of its particles, or gain some from the surroundings.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Feb 14, 2018 3:25 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Choosing Cp or Cv [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 205

Re: Choosing Cp or Cv [ENDORSED]

I think usually it can be implied because one of two is usually changing, thus you would use the other.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:06 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Super basic question about systems
Replies: 1
Views: 100

Re: Super basic question about systems

It is a closed system because no matter can leave/enter the system, however, energy can, thus, it is a closed system.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:37 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Expansion against a vacuum [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 134

Expansion against a vacuum [ENDORSED]

When you expand against a vacuum, can there be energy still transferred in the form of heat?
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Tue Feb 13, 2018 4:57 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Boiling point at room temperature
Replies: 5
Views: 183

Boiling point at room temperature

When you are finding the boiling point of water at room temperature, why do you have to cool the water back down to room temperature?
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Mon Feb 12, 2018 10:30 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Test 1 Question 1c
Replies: 3
Views: 135

Re: Test 1 Question 1c

No, the bond enthaply method is less accurate because it is an average energy released between the bond between two atoms across a multitude of molecules.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 11, 2018 9:07 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: q vs delta H
Replies: 2
Views: 122

Re: q vs delta H

deltaH is equal to q at constant pressure.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 11, 2018 9:06 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Practice Midterm from Sunday's Review Sess - #3C
Replies: 3
Views: 166

Re: Practice Midterm from Sunday's Review Sess - #3C

You can still calculate it by taking values and equations you know already. Because deltaS is a state function, you can take multiple steps to get there rather than just one. Just because water is not boiling at room temp, you can still find it the entropy of vaporization.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 11, 2018 9:02 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Irreversible vs Reversible
Replies: 3
Views: 184

Re: Irreversible vs Reversible

If the pressure is constant, you known the process is irreversible.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:06 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: delta U [ENDORSED]
Replies: 10
Views: 392

Re: delta U [ENDORSED]

Not necessarily. There can be work done.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:44 pm
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: 9.31
Replies: 2
Views: 143

Re: 9.31

I would assume that we will be given that information as he has given us other similar information on prior tests.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:41 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: Equation
Replies: 4
Views: 263

Re: Equation

I believe he said it is more commonly used in the form that he stated, and that it is more applicable.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:40 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Constant K and reaction quotient
Replies: 3
Views: 138

Re: Constant K and reaction quotient

So if Q=K, then a system is at equilibrium. If Q>K, then the system will favor the reverse because that means there is too much product (higher the value the more it favors the products. If Q<K, then the system will favor the forward reaction.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:38 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Delta S vs Delta U [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 401

Re: Delta S vs Delta U [ENDORSED]

Delta U represents the internal energy of a system, whether that is in the form of heat or work while Delta S represent the variability of different states that a molecule can be in (relating to degeneracy). Furthermore, Delta U uses strictly Jules as units while Delta S uses J/degree K.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:36 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Equations
Replies: 3
Views: 139

Re: Equations

Delta G represent free energy which is essentially saying the energy that is able to perform work. Thus the max amount of work a system can do corresponds to the free energy of the system.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:34 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Sig Figs
Replies: 6
Views: 151

Re: Sig Figs

One thing I would say is to wait to round with sig figs until your final answer!
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:33 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: test question 5
Replies: 5
Views: 260

Re: test question 5

Because neither energy nor matter can be added to system, nor can it leave the container. Just because a system is isolated does not mean that it cannot have heat or energy already in the system, but rather that it cannot be lost/gained.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:30 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Midterm
Replies: 5
Views: 304

Re: Midterm

In 14a, Dr. Lavelle made an announcement before the midterm stating which exact topics would be covered on the midterm.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:29 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: 9.37 d
Replies: 1
Views: 69

Re: 9.37 d

I believe it is because KCl is a very ordered crystal, giving it a lower entropy than KClO4 and KClO3 has less variability in where the Cl can be than KClO4, thus also resulting in lower entropy.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:25 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Friday Lecture Concept
Replies: 2
Views: 81

Re: Friday Lecture Concept

I was under the impression that we really only care about systems at equilibrium because biological systems are at equilibrium. I believe that he just made the reference that if Gn=Gp then the equilibrium is not at equilibrium.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:22 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Test 1 Question
Replies: 4
Views: 238

Re: Test 1 Question

An isolated system just means that energy can not be released/gained in the system. That does not mean that there can't be energy already in the system, and in this case, that energy is in the form of heat.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Tue Jan 30, 2018 10:12 pm
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: 9.27 A
Replies: 5
Views: 219

Re: 9.27 A

The more particles the molecule has, the higher the molar entropy. Because HBr is a bigger molecule (thus more particles) it will have the higher molar entropy.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Tue Jan 30, 2018 10:10 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: 9.11
Replies: 4
Views: 166

Re: 9.11

I believe it is because the starting equation is deltaS=nRTln(V2/V1) with volumes instead of pressure. If we apply Boyle's law that Pressure and Volume are inversely proportional (V1P1=V2P2) then we would be able to inverse the volumes to be pressures, thus deltaS=nRTln(P1/P2). To my knowledge, that...
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Mon Jan 29, 2018 11:16 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: 9.27a
Replies: 4
Views: 144

Re: 9.27a

More particles usually results in a higher entropy, which would explain why HBr (being the bigger molecule) has the higher entropy.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Mon Jan 29, 2018 11:14 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: 9.23 Determining what has higher entropy state
Replies: 4
Views: 208

Re: 9.23 Determining what has higher entropy state

Because there are only F atoms around the B, there is no variability in how the molecule is structured. However, with COF2, the Oxygen atom can be in one of three places, which causes a higher molar entropy.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Mon Jan 29, 2018 11:11 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Entropies of Condensation
Replies: 2
Views: 87

Re: Entropies of Condensation

I am fairly certain that the signs are just flipped.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Mon Jan 29, 2018 11:06 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Significant Figures
Replies: 2
Views: 315

Re: Significant Figures

I think a helpful tip to avoid this confusion is to always convert to Kelvin when working with entropy!
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:39 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Irreversible expansion
Replies: 4
Views: 148

Re: Irreversible expansion

A gas prefers to be at a lower pressure, and thus a higher volume. If it is able to do work to get to a lower pressure, it will stay there, making the process irreversible.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:36 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: When to use Kelvin or Celsius
Replies: 10
Views: 598

Re: When to use Kelvin or Celsius

For the most part, in thermochem we use a change in temperature, which means either kelvin or celsius will work considering they use the same scale. That being said, the ideal gas law uses kelvin.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:19 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 8.31
Replies: 3
Views: 173

8.31

I am struggling a bit on problem 8.31. Could someone explain how to approach this question?
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:17 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Intensive vs. Extensive Properties
Replies: 4
Views: 149

Re: Intensive vs. Extensive Properties

Put more simply, the specific heat of water will be the same in a 1g sample and a 1000g sample. Essentially, the property does not differ due to the amount of sample present.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:17 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Intensive vs. Extensive Properties
Replies: 4
Views: 149

Re: Intensive vs. Extensive Properties

Put more simply, the specific heat of water will be the same in a 1g sample and a 1000g sample. Essentially, the property does not differ due to the amount of sample present.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:56 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: What do these variables mean?
Replies: 4
Views: 178

Re: What do these variables mean?

Those are correct!
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sat Jan 13, 2018 7:49 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Intensive vs Extensive [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 187

Re: Intensive vs Extensive [ENDORSED]

Also to add, extensive properties are just things that we can alter about the substance not just the amount.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Fri Jan 12, 2018 2:47 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Heating Curve
Replies: 6
Views: 245

Re: Heating Curve

The length of the sloped lines will just represent the time it takes(horizontal) or the amount of temperature change after a phase change(vertical)
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Fri Jan 12, 2018 2:44 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Can homework be written in pencil?
Replies: 6
Views: 296

Re: Can homework be written in pencil?

I would suggest doing homework in pen to practice for tests and finals, that do require pen, however, I do not think points would be taken off if you used pencil.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:35 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Remembering VSEPR
Replies: 3
Views: 464

Re: Remembering VSEPR

Try to study the shapes in groups of the amount of bonding regions, that way when you substitute a lone pair for a bond, you will know the still know the shape.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Tue Dec 05, 2017 6:50 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Classifying Oxides as Amphoteric
Replies: 3
Views: 185

Re: Classifying Oxides as Amphoteric

An easy way to tell is if the molecule has both an acidic functional group and an acidic functional group. For example, most amino acids will have both. Another easy way to tell is if when a conjugate base to an acid still has a hydrogen in the molecule. HCO3^- can both accept a proton and give on a...
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Tue Dec 05, 2017 6:43 am
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: HW 12.3 c
Replies: 2
Views: 212

Re: HW 12.3 c

I believe that is because H2PO4^2- is a more stable ion than H3PO4 is. Thus, the atom would be more likely to donate, so it would gain more stability.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Tue Nov 28, 2017 12:59 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization and lone pairs
Replies: 3
Views: 193

Re: Hybridization and lone pairs

Yes you can consider lone pairs as a region of electron density! For example, H2O has two lone pairs but still has a hybridization of sp3.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Tue Nov 28, 2017 12:56 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 4.19 b
Replies: 3
Views: 171

Re: 4.19 b

I believe that is just a mistake in the book because the hybridization of the molecule is sp, implying that the molecule is linear.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:42 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming
Replies: 3
Views: 190

Re: Naming

I believe we are going to need to know the most common ligates from memory.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:04 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: K and Kc
Replies: 7
Views: 286

Re: K and Kc

They are essentially the same thing. If you are given just K, you can usually infer whether to use concentration or partial pressure by what you are given in the problem.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:02 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: di, bis, tri, tris, etc
Replies: 4
Views: 235

Re: di, bis, tri, tris, etc

Just to emphasize, polydentate refers to molecules that connect to the central atoms at multiple points.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Nov 15, 2017 2:32 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Specifying molecular geometry
Replies: 3
Views: 257

Re: Specifying molecular geometry

I would venture to say you will never have to verify the derivation of the molecular structure, but rather just what it is.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Nov 15, 2017 2:29 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Isoelectronic [ENDORSED]
Replies: 11
Views: 600

Re: Isoelectronic [ENDORSED]

However, these elements will have varying atomic radii.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Nov 15, 2017 2:25 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Unrelated midterm question
Replies: 2
Views: 177

Re: Unrelated midterm question

I believe there is a link on Lavelle's website about the midterm and possible partial credit.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Nov 15, 2017 2:09 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma and pi
Replies: 12
Views: 641

Re: Sigma and pi

Yes and this is due to the molecule having a non-hybrid p orbital.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Nov 15, 2017 2:07 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Electron geometry vs molecular geometry
Replies: 2
Views: 176

Re: Electron geometry vs molecular geometry

I would be prepared to identify both, as both have been covered.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Nov 15, 2017 2:06 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization beyond d orb
Replies: 1
Views: 112

Re: Hybridization beyond d orb

The f orbitals are extremely complex, with some shapes looking like a double sided pacifier.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Nov 15, 2017 2:05 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Why do octets expand?
Replies: 4
Views: 302

Re: Why do octets expand?

They are able to expand their valence shells by adding electrons to the d orbital!
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Mon Nov 06, 2017 12:30 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structures
Replies: 10
Views: 406

Re: Lewis Structures

I think if there are possible resonance structures, the potential question will instruct you to include how many or at least inform you there are multiple structures.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Sun Nov 05, 2017 12:45 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structures for Molecules with Expanded Octet
Replies: 1
Views: 121

Re: Lewis Structures for Molecules with Expanded Octet

Personally, I think it would be smart to model your Lewis structure to match the VSEPR shape just to incorporate both in your answer, but I don't think it would be incorrect to just put the lone pair on top, with four surrounding bonds for SF4.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Fri Oct 20, 2017 11:01 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: s-,p-, d-, and f- orbitals
Replies: 7
Views: 414

Re: s-,p-, d-, and f- orbitals

In essence and put simply, all the four different orbitals have different shapes relating to their axes. S has very simplistic orbitals, while f has very complex ones.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Fri Oct 20, 2017 10:58 am
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Heisenberg Uncertainty
Replies: 1
Views: 143

Re: Heisenberg Uncertainty

When using the uncertainty equation, you in fact use the uncertainty given rather than the certainty. So in this case, you would use the 0.1
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Fri Oct 13, 2017 5:54 pm
Forum: *Black Body Radiation
Topic: Blackbody
Replies: 2
Views: 296

Re: Blackbody

From what I understand, a blackbody is an object that absorbs all frequencies of visible light, and does not reflect any of them. An example would be glass. It is useful because we are able to study light with them.
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Fri Oct 13, 2017 5:34 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Difference Between Work Function and the Energy Required to Remove an Electron from one Atom [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 348

Re: Difference Between Work Function and the Energy Required to Remove an Electron from one Atom [ENDORSED]

The question asked for the energy for a single atom, not for a mole of sodium, while the work function was given in KJ/mol. In order to find the energy for a singular atom, divide the work function by Avogadro's number (6.022* 10^23)
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:08 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs in 0.0380 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 388

Re: Sig Figs in 0.0380 [ENDORSED]

Zeroes are only considered significant figures when they are "sandwiched" between two non-zero numbers or a non-zero number and decimal point ( ex. 505, 9.09, 50.); or if it is at the end of decimal showing precision (34.0).
by Mitch Mologne 1A
Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:50 am
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Sig Figs
Replies: 9
Views: 876

Sig Figs

When doing a problem that does not have any number values in the question but uses molar masses that extend to 4 sig figs, should you use the standard 3 sig figs in your answer or 4 sig figs coming from the molar masses?

Go to advanced search