Search found 20 matches

by Kourtney Nham 1L
Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:21 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Bases
Topic: Base Strength
Replies: 2
Views: 287

Re: Base Strength

To add on, this effect is called the conjugate seesaw. The stronger the acid, the weaker its conjugate base and the stronger the base, the weaker its conjugate acid. We can derive this from the fact that we know [Ka][Kb]=10^-14. Therefore, as Ka increases, Kb must decrease and vice versa. The larger...
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:15 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Determining acidity
Replies: 3
Views: 216

Determining acidity

I understand that strong acids lose protons more easily and therefore have weaker bonds. However, I'm a little unclear one what it means by "oxoacids are more ready to lose protons if the resulting anion is stabilized by electron withdrawing atoms which delocalize and stable the negative charge...
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:49 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma and Pi bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 330

Re: Sigma and Pi bonds

Can someone explain how these definitions relate to delocalized pi bonds? Do delocalized pi bonds pretty much just refer to resonance?
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:24 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Backward Reaction
Replies: 2
Views: 294

Re: Backward Reaction

You can think of this in terms of how you calculate Q and K. You divide the products' concentration/pressure to their respective stoichiometric coefficients by the reactants' concentration/pressure to their respective stoichiometric coefficients. If Q>K, you know there is more products present than ...
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Fri Nov 24, 2017 5:31 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelates
Replies: 2
Views: 136

Chelates

Can anyone clarify what a chelate is? How do you identify if a ligand is a chelating ligand?
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Fri Nov 24, 2017 5:24 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination number [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 229

Re: Coordination number [ENDORSED]

Typically I look at the subscript on the ligand in the brackets (which indicates what is in the coordination sphere). For [Fe(CN)6]^4- and [CO(NH3)6]Cl2H2O, the coordination number is 6. For [Co(SCN)4]K2, the coordination number is 4.
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Fri Nov 17, 2017 12:33 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone Pairs
Replies: 5
Views: 304

Re: Lone Pairs

Just to add on, in general, if there are multiple lone pairs, you want to put them as far apart as possible because they are extremely repulsive!
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Fri Nov 17, 2017 12:26 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Coordination sphere
Replies: 3
Views: 229

Coordination sphere

Can anyone explain what a coordination sphere is? I'm having a hard time conceptualizing it. Thanks!
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Thu Nov 09, 2017 4:55 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Test 1 Question Q2B
Replies: 4
Views: 611

Re: Test 1 Question Q2B

The molarity of the stock solution was 2.00 M NaOH. So you'd set up the equation as (2 M)(Vi)=(.650 M)(.250 L). Vi=.08125 L which is equivalent to 81.2 mL (only 3 sig figs are given, and numbers ending with 5 are rounded to the closest even number).
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Tue Nov 07, 2017 8:57 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 3.101
Replies: 1
Views: 163

3.101

Can anyone explain question 3.101? Is the isolobal analogy something we'll need to know for midterm?
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Thu Nov 02, 2017 10:32 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: 5a,c ; 19b,e ; 21d
Replies: 2
Views: 208

Re: 5a,c ; 19b,e ; 21d

For Ga3+ the electron configuration is [Ar]3d^104s^24p^1. Since the electrons in 4p and 4s are higher energy, they would be removed first, leaving you with [Ar]3d^10.
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Thu Nov 02, 2017 10:16 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Writing Electron Configurations for ions
Replies: 1
Views: 121

Re: Writing Electron Configurations for ions

Copper's usual electron configuration is one of the exceptions to the rule. Instead of [Ar]3d^94s^2, it turns out that having a full d orbital (d^10) is lower energy, so copper's configuration is actually [Ar]3d^104s^1. Therefore, Cu+ removes the electron in the s orbital making the configuration [A...
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:31 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Transition Metals
Replies: 3
Views: 185

Re: Transition Metals

Is there a way to figure out what the charge of a transition metal cation would/could be?
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:15 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Anion electron configuration [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 212

Re: Anion electron configuration [ENDORSED]

Cations are smaller because when you remove an electron to form cations the effective nuclear charge increases (protons can pull electrons closer because there are less of them). Conversely, adding an electron to form anions reduces the effective nuclear charge because there are now more electrons t...
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Sun Oct 22, 2017 1:37 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Cartesian axes [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 196

Re: Cartesian axes [ENDORSED]

Cartesian axes are simply the axes x, y, and for a third dimension, z. When graphing something, the coordinates indicate where it is on the plane in respect to the axes. This can be used to describe orientation of orbitals. For example, the 2p orbitals are perpendicular to each other and lie along t...
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Sat Oct 21, 2017 7:51 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Configuration Notation [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 259

Re: Configuration Notation [ENDORSED]

Can someone explain why copper and chromium are exceptions for electron configurations?
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:00 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: photoelectric effect post-module assessment [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 331

Re: photoelectric effect post-module assessment [ENDORSED]

The question asks for the amount of energy needed to remove an electron from a single sodium atom. In order to solve, you take the work function, convert it to joules, and then divide by Avagadro's number to get the answer. 150.6 KJ/mol is 150600 J/mol. 150600 J/mol divided by 6.02 x 10^23 atoms/mol...
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:33 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: How to Find Wavelength Given only the velocity? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 226

Re: How to Find Wavelength Given only the velocity? [ENDORSED]

Just to add on, the wavelength=h/(mv) equation is known as the De Broglie equation. You may also see it written as wavelength=h/p, where p is momentum (which can be found by multiplying mass times velocity).
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Thu Oct 05, 2017 6:29 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: E.15 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 10
Views: 693

Re: E.15 [ENDORSED]

Going off what Charlotte said, it helps to look at the problem like 'M' is a variable!
by Kourtney Nham 1L
Tue Oct 03, 2017 9:24 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Help with M9
Replies: 5
Views: 366

Re: Help with M9

Hi! Spectator ions are ions whose forms aren't changed during the reaction. In the question, the original equation would be Cu(NO 3 ) 2 + 2NaOH --> Cu(OH) 2 + 2NaNO 3 . Based on solubility rules, the equation in an ionic form would look like Cu 2+ + 2NO 3 - + 2Na + + 2OH - --> Cu(OH) 2 + 2Na + + 2NO...

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