Search found 20 matches

by Ethan Mondell 1A
Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:55 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: % dissociation
Replies: 3
Views: 351

% dissociation

What is meant % dissociation for Acids? How can you calculate that?
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:51 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted and Lewis Acids
Replies: 3
Views: 301

Bronsted and Lewis Acids

Can a molecule be both a Lewis Acid and a Bronsted base? Or a Bronsted acid and also a Lewis base?
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:43 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: When can a tetrahedral be non polar? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 813

Re: When can a tetrahedral be non polar? [ENDORSED]

If all four surrounding atoms are the same in a tetrahedral, then the molecule will always be nonpolar. The only exception is if for some reason one or more of the surrounding atoms had a lone pair.
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:36 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: 17.35 Chelating Complexes
Replies: 4
Views: 372

Re: 17.35 Chelating Complexes

A chelating complex is when a ligand can bond to the same metal atom more than once, creating a sort of cage/ring around it. In 17.35, B is the only one that can form a chelating complex because it is the only one with the two NH2 molecules close enough to bond with a metal atom. The other two compl...
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:05 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: CO3^2- Tridentate
Replies: 2
Views: 268

CO3^2- Tridentate

I'm confused as to why CO3^2- can only be mono- or bidentate yet it cannot be Tridentate? I know the lewis structure of CO3 2- has 2 of the oxygen atoms with 3 lone pairs of electrons and just one bond to Carbon each and those are the two oxygen that would make CO3^2- bidentate. I'm wondering why th...
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Wed Nov 22, 2017 12:41 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Homework 11.25 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 223

Re: Homework 11.25 [ENDORSED]

I don't think we'd be expected to know the entire table for the test, I think whatever we need will be provided. Just as long as you know how to solve the problem using the table, I think you'll be okay.
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Thu Nov 16, 2017 11:55 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR Notation
Replies: 2
Views: 253

Re: VSEPR Notation

Just to add a little more, all molecules with the same AXE formula will have the same general shape, however, they may vary slightly in their bond angles.
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Thu Nov 16, 2017 8:36 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: bond angle
Replies: 4
Views: 454

bond angle

I'm kind of confused about bond angles. Where exactly are the angles measured in relation to? Are they always measure in relation to the central atom?
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Thu Nov 09, 2017 9:47 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Multiple lewis structures for radicals [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 293

Multiple lewis structures for radicals [ENDORSED]

Since radicals already violate the octet rule, does it really matter where the extra lone electron is placed? for example in the Methyl radical, CH3, the extra electron is put on the carbon, but could it be placed on one of the hydrogens?
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Thu Nov 09, 2017 9:38 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole moment equation [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 184

Dipole moment equation [ENDORSED]

Dipole moments are calculated by multiplying Bond length x charge difference, but aren't those inverse relations to a certain extent. I'm confused, because if the charge difference is greater, doesn't that mean the molecule/compound is more polar/ionic? If that's true then wouldn't that make the bon...
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Wed Nov 01, 2017 9:34 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Electron Configurations
Replies: 2
Views: 251

Re: Electron Configurations

Normally the following electron configurations would be accurate Co: [Ar] 3d7 4s2 Fe: [Ar] 3d6 4s2 Since the electron configurations that were given to us both were missing the 4s orbital yet had electrons in the 3d orbital, we can infer that the electron configurations must be those of cations beca...
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Wed Nov 01, 2017 8:49 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 388

Re: Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds

Just to add a little more, if the difference in electronegativities falls between the 1.5 and 2.0 difference gap, then you can always consider that some Ionic bonds have covalent characteristics. This means that even if there is an Ionic bond between two atoms, they can still be sharing the electron...
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Fri Oct 27, 2017 8:15 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Octet Rule [ENDORSED]
Replies: 9
Views: 1005

Re: Octet Rule [ENDORSED]

Another exception to the octet rule would be radicals, compounds with unpaired electrons, meaning they would always have an odd number of electrons. Radicals, for the most part, are very temporary molecules and usually only form temporarily in some reactions.
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Fri Oct 27, 2017 8:07 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: s- electrons vs p- electrons [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 660

Re: s- electrons vs p- electrons [ENDORSED]

For the most part it really just has to do with proximity to the nucleus. Closer the nucleus, more attraction between protons and electrons, lower energy.
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Thu Oct 19, 2017 9:52 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: s-,p-, d-, and f- orbitals
Replies: 7
Views: 497

Re: s-,p-, d-, and f- orbitals

Depending on the type of orbital (s,p,d, or f) there can be different orientations of the orbital which is the "m sub l" quantum number. If the orbital is S then there can only be one orientation because S orbitals are spheres. The P oribital can have 3 different orientations on the xyz ax...
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Thu Oct 19, 2017 9:26 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Nodal Planes
Replies: 2
Views: 239

Re: Nodal Planes

I think nodes are spherical areas in the atom where the probability of finding electrons is zero while nodal planes are flat cross-sections of the atom in which electrons tend to not travel. They are related by the fact that electrons don't travel in those areas but I think Nodes are typically found...
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:29 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: photoelectric effect post-module assessment [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 433

photoelectric effect post-module assessment [ENDORSED]

28. "Light hits a sodium metal surface and the velocity of the ejected electron is 6.61 x 10^5 m.s^-1. The work function for sodium is 150.6 KJ.mol^-1. "how much energy is required to remove an electron from one sodium atom? A) 2.501 x 10^-22 J B) 1.506 x 10^5 J C) 2.501 x 10^-19 J D) 9.06...
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:04 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Constants that need to be memorized
Replies: 6
Views: 449

Re: Constants that need to be memorized

I'm not certain but I think most of the constants will be given to us on the test so you don't need to memorize much.
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:57 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: M. 19
Replies: 1
Views: 236

M. 19

On question M.19, it states that caffeine is burned and .682g of Carbon dioxide, .174g of water, and .110g of nitrogen are formed. When I did the problem I assumed that caffeine was only made of N, C, and H while the O just came from the surrounding O2 in the air. What parts in the problem tell us t...
by Ethan Mondell 1A
Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:44 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: G25 homework problem
Replies: 7
Views: 573

Re: G25 homework problem

Are there additional ways to solve this problem other than the solutions listed in the manual and this forum?

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