Search found 63 matches

by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Tue Mar 20, 2018 11:28 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: catalysts
Replies: 3
Views: 383

Re: catalysts

a catalyst is used up (as a reactant) and then produced again (as a product).
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Mar 15, 2018 10:04 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: 15.63
Replies: 3
Views: 155

Re: 15.63

FYI If you derive the Arrhenius equation yourself, you may also get ln(k2/k1) = (Ea/R)(1/T1- 1/T2), and it works as well. As long as whatever k you have on the top, you have the corresponding T second.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Mar 15, 2018 10:02 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Fast or Slow
Replies: 8
Views: 251

Re: Fast or Slow

The problem may ask you to determine which is the rate-limiting step, which we know is the slow step. If so, you have to analyze each step to see if it's individual rate law matches the overall rate law. Remember, you may have to use the pre-equilibrium approach in order to do so. Whichver step's ra...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Mon Mar 12, 2018 12:12 am
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7337
Views: 823841

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

Hey girl. Are you made out of salt? Because your SO-DIUM fine. ;)
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Fri Mar 09, 2018 4:15 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: k' in Pseudo-First-Order Rate Laws
Replies: 4
Views: 546

k' in Pseudo-First-Order Rate Laws

Why is k' used in the pseudo-first-order rate law? Doesn't k' mean the rate constant for the reverse reaction? Thanks!
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Fri Mar 09, 2018 4:10 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Chapter 15 #85
Replies: 2
Views: 113

Re: Chapter 15 #85

For example, the rxn for #85a is CH3CHO --> CH3 + CHO You know that in this reaction, the bond between the two carbon atoms is breaking. Therefore, the structure for the activation complex would be [H3C ---- CHO] (and put the little symbol for activation complex) Basically, you put a line to represe...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Fri Mar 09, 2018 4:04 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: formula on 15.61
Replies: 3
Views: 125

Re: formula on 15.61

I have the same question!!
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Mon Feb 26, 2018 2:57 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: 14.27
Replies: 6
Views: 214

Re: 14.27

It would seem easier to just add up the E values for each half reaction, correct? However, you can only do this when solving for the potential of an entire reaction, not a half reaction. To solve for the potential of a HALF-REACTION, you must find the delta G values of each one, add them together, t...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Mon Feb 26, 2018 2:53 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Calculating slope
Replies: 4
Views: 154

Re: Calculating slope

It would make sense that as time increases, ln[A] should decrease as well. However, the rate constant, k, is always a positive number, therefore a negative sign must be put in front to make the slope of the line negative.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:49 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 14.13 c
Replies: 1
Views: 64

Re: 14.13 c

Because HCl is a strong acid and likely to dissociate into it's ions.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:48 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Standard potential and redox
Replies: 1
Views: 65

Re: Standard potential and redox

A higher (positive) reduction potential means that it is more likely to be reduced. Therefore if the standard reduction potential is negative, the couple is more liekly to be oxidized and act as a reducing agent ( higher reducing strength).
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:45 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Devising Galvanic Cells
Replies: 1
Views: 75

Re: Devising Galvanic Cells

If the mediums you're working with do not include a solid as a conductor. For example, if one ion gets oxidized or reduced to another ion instead of a solid. Therefore it needs an inert conductor like platinum
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Feb 21, 2018 4:03 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 14.107 Determining K
Replies: 1
Views: 72

Re: 14.107 Determining K

K= [H+]/[OH-]

@pH 1: 1=-log[H+] --> [H+] = 1x10^-1 M
therefore, pOH 13: [OH-]= 1x10^-13 M

@pH 14: [H+]= 1x10^-14 M
therefore, pOH 0: [OH-]= 1x10^0= 1.0 M

There is an error in the solution manual for this problem, so I'd check on Lavelle's website.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Tue Feb 20, 2018 4:54 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: K sig figs
Replies: 4
Views: 147

K sig figs

How do we know how many sig figs to include when solving for K for our final answer? Is K usually just 1 sig fig?
Thanks
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:20 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 14.13 part D
Replies: 2
Views: 108

Re: 14.13 part D

Same, I thought it would have been Au+(aq) --> Au3+(aq) + 2e- , with Pt(s) as the conducting solid....
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Sat Feb 10, 2018 4:07 pm
Forum: Biological Examples (*DNA Structural Transitions, etc.)
Topic: STP [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 323

STP [ENDORSED]

Is a reaction at STP (standard Temp and Pressure) @ 0*C or 25*C? I believe I've seen both used so I just want to clarify.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:44 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: 9.75
Replies: 2
Views: 104

Re: 9.75

When you draw out the cis molecule (X2 on same side) versus the trans molecule (X2 on opposite sides), and proceed to rotate them, the cis molecule has many more orientations than the other molecule.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:40 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Irreversible Vs. Reversible Expansion
Replies: 2
Views: 106

Re: Irreversible Vs. Reversible Expansion

Irreversible is spontaneous in one direction, and is highly unlikely to proceed in reverse. It does less work than reversible expansion because it is typically expanding on a lower pressure. On the other hand, you can think of a reversible expansion as equally proceeding in both directions because t...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Mon Feb 05, 2018 8:57 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Types of Disorders [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 177

Types of Disorders [ENDORSED]

When discussing entropy, what's the difference between positional and thermal disorder? (Question 9.85)
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Mon Feb 05, 2018 8:53 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: test question 7 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 216

Re: test question 7 [ENDORSED]

I think the "inital deltaH" that you are thinking of is the deltaH(fus) of water, which is needed for the phase change of the ice cube to liquid water. The other steps only require q=mCdeltaT
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Mon Feb 05, 2018 8:50 am
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Entropy question [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 87

Re: Entropy question [ENDORSED]

Some people believe that the universe is always expanding, therefore entropy must be increasing.
Other reasons are because an increase in entropy is favorable, and the universe will always go toward the more favorable outcome.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Mon Feb 05, 2018 8:47 am
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Naming Question [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 183

Re: Naming Question [ENDORSED]

Can think of a reversible reaction as being at equilibrium?
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Sun Feb 04, 2018 10:45 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: change in entropy with change in temperature
Replies: 2
Views: 92

Re: change in entropy with change in temperature

You use the one with R when you have V1/V2. You use the one with C when you have T1/T2.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:56 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: q(REV)
Replies: 3
Views: 117

q(REV)

What exactly is q(REV) and how does it differ from q? Why is the (REV) significant, since when solving for deltaS we tend to replace it with deltaH anyways?

thanks!
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Jan 24, 2018 11:19 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Calculating the Change in Enthalpy
Replies: 4
Views: 162

Re: Calculating the Change in Enthalpy

The change in enthalpy of a phase change will often be given to you, as deltaHfus, deltaHvap. You could also calculate these if you know the amount of heat released or needed (q) and the number of moles, by using the equation q=ndeltaHfus/vap.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Jan 24, 2018 9:45 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: isothermal system
Replies: 3
Views: 163

Re: isothermal system

In an isothermal system, deltaT is zero vecause the temperature is constant. For an ideal gas, deltaU=(3/2)nRdeltaT. Therefore, if deltaT=0, then deltaU=0. I believe this is only for ideal gases...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Jan 24, 2018 9:43 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Reversible Expansion vs Irreversible Expansion
Replies: 1
Views: 80

Re: Reversible Expansion vs Irreversible Expansion

Example... Irreversible: 4 atm --> 2 atm Reversible (@ equilibrium): 3 atm --> 3 atm Which one does more work, the one pushing on 2 atm or the one pushing on 3 atm? @ equilibrium, the system is theoretically doing the max work it can. That's why reversible reactions do not often occur in biological ...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:50 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: deltaH Units
Replies: 5
Views: 188

deltaH Units

When putting our final answer, how do we know whether the units for deltaH are kJ or kJ/mol? I've seen both so I was wondering if we would get marked off on the test if we wrote the wrong one. Thanks!
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:47 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: delta n
Replies: 3
Views: 580

Re: delta n

It is also important to note that limiting reactants may still apply to a problem. For example in question 101, you have to determine the limiting reactant and then the amount of moles in excess. You would also the have to add the moles of excess to the moles of product you calculated using the bala...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:44 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: bond enthalpies
Replies: 3
Views: 148

Re: bond enthalpies

In addition, you must do this because it would take much more energy to break the bonds for liquid or solid compounds... the bond enthalpies would extremely high.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Sun Jan 21, 2018 5:59 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Cv vs. Cp [ENDORSED]
Replies: 13
Views: 849

Re: Cv vs. Cp [ENDORSED]

Cv is the molar heat capacity of a gas @ CONSTANT VOLUME, whereas Cp is the molar heat capacity of a gas at CONSTANT PRESSURE. In one example (#31), you would use it when doing q=mCdeltaT if you're given an ideal gas but no molar heat capacity. The Cp and Cv for ideal gases can be found on Lavelle's...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Fri Jan 19, 2018 3:25 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Isolated system
Replies: 3
Views: 179

Re: Isolated system

In class we discussed that the Internal Heat, U, of an isolated system has no change since it not affected by q or w, since it is isolated. Therefore, deltaU = 0.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Jan 18, 2018 6:07 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 3 Methods
Replies: 2
Views: 85

Re: 3 Methods

Enthalpy of the total reaction.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Jan 18, 2018 10:50 am
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Delta H and q Interchangeability
Replies: 5
Views: 200

Re: Delta H and q Interchangeability

This is why sometimes Lavelle will write qp instead of q, indicating it is at constant pressure and is interchangeable with deltaH.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:48 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Thermochemistry Sections in Ch 8
Replies: 2
Views: 119

Re: Thermochemistry Sections in Ch 8

If you're doing the hw problems, I would say the "enthalpy" section, which starts with problem 8.29.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:43 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Cm
Replies: 3
Views: 143

Re: Cm

This is as opposed to Cs, which would be specific heat capacity with units J/(g*C)
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:40 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 8.61
Replies: 3
Views: 131

Re: 8.61

Just remember that the goal is to get the desired reaction. Sometimes, you have to flip the internal reactions in order to get the correct reactants and products for the desired reaction.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:37 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 8.45
Replies: 1
Views: 68

Re: 8.45

First you have to calculate the number of moles needed to produce that amount of heat absorbed. Since you know that q=n*deltaH, therefore n=(q)/(deltaH). this will give you moles per reaction, but you have to remember that there are 4 moles of CS2 produced per every reaction, so multiply what you go...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:33 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: 8.3 Homework
Replies: 4
Views: 196

Re: 8.3 Homework

The work is done TO the system, since the outside pressure pushes the piston down causing the compression. Because the system doesn't have to do any work, therefore the work on the interior air is positive. IF the piston moved out to increase the volume inside, then the system would be DOING the wor...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Dec 07, 2017 6:42 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Oxoacids
Replies: 4
Views: 210

Re: Oxoacids

This explains why oxoacids are strong acids. They are more willing to lose their H+ because after losing the H+, they have more options for resonance, which makes the compound more stable.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Dec 07, 2017 6:38 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Finding Q and which way the reaction shifts
Replies: 1
Views: 103

Re: Finding Q and which way the reaction shifts

They will either give you the chemical equation or tell you what the reactants and products are. However, you could sometimes assume the direction if one of the compounds is a strong acid because you know it will completely dissociate and is not likely to reform.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Dec 07, 2017 6:26 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: Relationship between Kpa and Ph
Replies: 3
Views: 182

Re: Relationship between Kpa and Ph

pH and pOH take the -log[ H+ or OH-]. They are not the same as their respective Ka or Kb, which shows the relationship between all concentrations in the rxn, not just [H+] or [OH-].
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Mon Dec 04, 2017 5:18 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Ionic Equation
Replies: 3
Views: 445

Re: Ionic Equation

The question is not super clear but if you are referring to writing net ionic equations then you know which species dissociates based on solubility rules and strong acids and bases. There are 3 basic steps to writing net ionic equations: (1) write a balanced equation with the states of matter inclu...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Mon Dec 04, 2017 5:15 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Proton Transfer Reactions
Replies: 2
Views: 143

Re: Proton Transfer Reactions

Sodium is left out because it is a cation completely unrelated to the proton transfer reaction. this is because it gets cancelled out when you do the net ionic equation for the reaction.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:07 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Localization
Replies: 3
Views: 266

Re: Localization

think of resonance!!
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:05 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: 17.31 c and d confusion
Replies: 5
Views: 306

Re: 17.31 c and d confusion

I forgot to mention that OH2 would be correct IF the transition metal was written on the LEFT side of water... if it was written on the RIGHT, it should be H2O :)
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:00 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: 17.31 c and d confusion
Replies: 5
Views: 306

Re: 17.31 c and d confusion

Hi Mike, How water is written does not matter, so long as it is correctly written with two hydrogens and one oxygen. H2O and OH2 are equally correct. For part d., because oxalate has the prefix bis-, this has higher priority than "diaqua" as b precedes d. Hope this helps. But I thought th...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Nov 30, 2017 4:52 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Ch 11 #89
Replies: 2
Views: 158

Re: Ch 11 #89

What do you mean by "ratios of the change in equilibrium"?
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Nov 30, 2017 4:46 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Naming Complexes
Replies: 6
Views: 935

Re: Naming Complexes

and a polydentate is when the ligand can bind at multiple sites the transition metal. However, although N2 has 2 pairs of lone pairs on each nitrogent, it is not a polydentate because it would be impossible for both nitrogens to bind to the T.M. at the same time.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Thu Nov 30, 2017 4:40 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Denate
Replies: 3
Views: 149

Re: Denate

Sometimes if works if you count the number of Nitrogens because you know that they usually have a lone pair, however you also have to remember that if the nitrogens are right next to each other, they wont both bind at the same time... ultimately I would just draw the Lewis structure because then you...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Nov 15, 2017 4:32 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Bond Order
Replies: 5
Views: 301

Re: Bond Order

Yep so for example if the molecule has 2 single bonds and a double bond in resonance, then the bond order would be (1+1+2)/(3 total regions)= 1.33
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Nov 15, 2017 4:28 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization significance
Replies: 2
Views: 160

Re: Hybridization significance

Hybridization occurs because it allows atoms to form more bonds than their stated number of unpaired e-. For example, Carbon is 2s^2 2p^2, so we know that the ones in the s- orbital are spin paired and the two in the p-orbital are not. By this logic, that should mean that carbon can only form two bo...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Nov 08, 2017 9:02 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 3.77
Replies: 2
Views: 122

Re: 3.77

To determine which one has more ionic character, compare the electronegativities of each. You don't have to know the exact numbers, but know that Cl is more electronegative than I, F is more electronegative than H, etc. The species with the higher difference in EN in each pair is the one with more i...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Nov 08, 2017 8:59 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: 3.55
Replies: 3
Views: 180

Re: 3.55

It may also help to draw out the lewis structures for each one. If an atom in one has an unpaired e-, then the species is a radical.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Sat Nov 04, 2017 4:42 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic and Covalent Bonds
Replies: 9
Views: 334

Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Ionic bonds join two nonmetal atoms, covalent bonds join two ions. If the electronegativity difference is >2 then it is considered an ionic bond, if electronegativity difference is <1.5 then it is considered a covalent bond. This first part of this answer is a bit mixed up: ionic bonds join ions (t...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Sat Nov 04, 2017 4:33 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Monoatomic Ions and Polyatomic ions
Replies: 1
Views: 86

Re: Monoatomic Ions and Polyatomic ions

Monoatomic ions only have one atom, so since it's the only atom, it must be the middle atom.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Fri Oct 27, 2017 11:02 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Which atom would carry the formal charge
Replies: 3
Views: 377

Re: Which atom would carry the formal charge

If you haven't memorized the periodic trends already, it's also important to know HOW they exists if you are not given the electronegativities. EN increases as you go to the right of the periodic table because as more valence e- are added, they become closer to an octet. You can think of EN as how m...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Fri Oct 27, 2017 10:33 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Resonance in SO4
Replies: 5
Views: 289

Re: Resonance in SO4

The most ideal situation is...
1. Formal charge closest to zero
2. central atom w/o charge
3. charges (if any) distributed as evenly as possible among atoms (2- vs 1- and 1-)
Hope this helps!
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Sat Oct 21, 2017 9:36 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Solving
Replies: 2
Views: 135

Re: Solving

Also, it wouldn't be an equal sign because since it is "uncertain", it can never equal a certain number-- there must be a range of uncertainty where the exact position and velocity of an object lie at a certain time.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Oct 18, 2017 12:46 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Atomic Spectra and Energy Levels
Replies: 3
Views: 210

Re: Atomic Spectra and Energy Levels

This is because as the electron is moving farther away from the nucleus, eventually it will go to infinity , which in that case it's ejected and the Energy=0.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Oct 18, 2017 12:44 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Oscillation of Light
Replies: 3
Views: 179

Re: Modules

Gabriela Carrillo 1B wrote:Is the module "Chemical Equilibrium Part 1" part of this week's lectures??

Nope, it's just next on the modules because it's the one other topic that he feels is hardest. After the Quantum World we're probably gonna do Chemical Bonds.
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Sun Oct 08, 2017 12:25 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: All students read this sig fig post [ENDORSED]
Replies: 91
Views: 8306

Re: All students read this sig fig post [ENDORSED]

On the test on 10/6/17, I had trouble allotting enough time to answer all the questions and I believe it was mostly as a result of me taking my time thinking about what significant figures I should be using throughout my intermittent calculations. Are significant figures a crucial part to the test ...
by Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
Wed Oct 04, 2017 7:10 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]
Replies: 113
Views: 35850

Re: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]

I would definitely get or review an old AP Chem test prep book, in addition to office hours, etc.

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