Search found 51 matches

by Bansi Amin 1D
Sat Mar 17, 2018 8:49 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7609
Views: 1019891

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

I hope this posts properly lol
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sat Mar 17, 2018 8:34 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Elementary steps
Replies: 2
Views: 274

Elementary steps

In elementary steps, how are we finding the order when we're writing the rate laws? Are they coming from the stoichiometric coefficients because these are elementary steps? Because I know that the order isn't related to the stoichiometric coefficient, but when doing the mechanism problems, that's wh...
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sat Mar 17, 2018 8:28 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Delta G units
Replies: 3
Views: 1278

Delta G units

In the equation ΔG° = -nFE° we end up with units of joules while with the equation ∆G°=-RTlnK, we end up with units of joules per mole. How is this possible, and is there a way for ΔG° = -nFE° to yield units joules/mole?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:23 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7609
Views: 1019891

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

Q: What's a cation?
A: An ion with paws-itive charge :)
-3He
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:19 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7609
Views: 1019891

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

Are you a nucleophile?
Because all you seem to do is bring negativity into my life.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:12 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: SN2
Replies: 2
Views: 119

Re: SN2

A nucleophile is a species that donates an electron pair, like a Lewis base. They replace another species that is more electronegative than the central atom that the nucleophile is being bound to. The substitution process occurs bc the leaving group is taking electrons from the central atom, and the...
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Mar 04, 2018 4:37 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Quiz 3
Replies: 6
Views: 280

Re: Quiz 3

I read on another question that the test would cover up to question #49 I believe... Can anyone clear this up? The only questions between 39 and 49 listed on the outline are #45 and #47, and those both cover reaction mechanisms. Lavelle said in lecture that we won't be covering reaction mechanisms ...
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Mar 04, 2018 4:32 pm
Forum: Second Order Reactions
Topic: Linearization of a Second Order Reaction
Replies: 3
Views: 359

Re: Linearization of a Second Order Reaction

The inverse is taken because we equate the rate to k[A]^2, and when we bring the terms over to one side, we are left with the inverse of [A].
(-1/a)*(d[A]/dt)=k[A]^2
at a=1:
(d[A]/[A]^2)=-k*dt
Integration leads to the inverse. We take the inverse because that's what it mathematically turns out to be.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Mar 04, 2018 4:23 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Kinetics vs Thermodynamics
Replies: 4
Views: 212

Re: Kinetics vs Thermodynamics

It depends on what the reaction is dependent upon and based off of that, which pathway the reaction will take.The kinetic pathway is the easiest pathway. A kinetically controlled reaction will be faster and when compared to a thermodynamic pathway, the products are less stable. The activation energy...
by Bansi Amin 1D
Tue Feb 27, 2018 8:45 pm
Forum: Experimental Details
Topic: Homework Problem 15.3 Part C
Replies: 5
Views: 438

Homework Problem 15.3 Part C

Part C asks what the unique rate of the reaction is. What does unique rate of reaction mean?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 25, 2018 6:20 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Negative Sign [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 306

Re: Negative Sign [ENDORSED]

The negative sign is so that the rate of your reactants is positive. We want to work with positive reaction rates, so we use the negative sign to make the reactants rate positive. Without the negative sign, we'd end up with a negative value because the [R] is decreasing. The final concentration is s...
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 25, 2018 6:17 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: activation energy
Replies: 4
Views: 188

Re: activation energy

A high activation energy means that the reaction is going to be slower to occur. The reaction takes more energy to occur, and will thus have a slower rate.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 25, 2018 6:14 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: Relation to Reaction Stoichiometry?
Replies: 2
Views: 134

Re: Relation to Reaction Stoichiometry?

By reaction stoichiometry, do you mean the stoichiometric coefficients? If so, I don't believe they are related.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 18, 2018 9:08 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: "Rules"
Replies: 7
Views: 272

Re: "Rules"

I think it's that you start out balancing with water, and then use the hydroxide to balance the water.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 18, 2018 9:02 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Platinum electrodes
Replies: 4
Views: 167

Re: Platinum electrodes

Are there any cases where a platinum electrode cannot be used and a different one has to be used? If so, do we need to know that for the purposes of this class?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 18, 2018 9:00 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Order in Cell Diagrams
Replies: 4
Views: 155

Re: Order in Cell Diagrams

As long as you put the reactant first and the product second, the order of phases should line up
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 11, 2018 10:26 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Isothermic
Replies: 4
Views: 213

Re: Isothermic

What is meant by constant measures?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 11, 2018 10:25 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Oxidation
Replies: 4
Views: 115

Re: Oxidation

You can also use "an ox" and "red cat" to help you remember that an anode is oxidized and a cathode is reduced.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 11, 2018 10:22 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Reversible vs Irreversible
Replies: 2
Views: 153

Re: Reversible vs Irreversible

They differ because you're taking the area under curve, and the area's are each different and have different equations. Lavelle has a detailed diagram on his website showing this. It's under the lecture outlines.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 04, 2018 7:07 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Test Number 1
Replies: 9
Views: 340

Re: Test Number 1

So the heat was transferred to make up for the change in energy in the system?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 04, 2018 6:58 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7609
Views: 1019891

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

Fun fact: Josiah Gibbs was a Swiftie.
Haters gonna hate Taylor Swift=> ΔG=ΔH−TΔS
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Feb 04, 2018 6:54 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Heat transfer
Replies: 7
Views: 272

Re: Heat transfer

Heat was being transferred to make up for the energy change.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Jan 28, 2018 9:31 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: work done on and by the system
Replies: 12
Views: 566

Re: work done on and by the system

When given a word problem, how can we tell that work is being done on the system or by the system?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Jan 28, 2018 9:24 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Superheating
Replies: 6
Views: 441

Re: Superheating

Are there any other examples of superheating besides the microwave one?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Jan 28, 2018 9:19 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Difference between systems? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 331

Re: Difference between systems? [ENDORSED]

Is a thermos still considered an isolated system if a person drinks from it?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:00 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: HW #3
Replies: 3
Views: 146

Re: HW #3

As long as you know the concepts behind the questions you should be fine.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:46 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Reversible vs Irreversible
Replies: 4
Views: 151

Re: Reversible vs Irreversible

Why is reversible work done so slowly?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:40 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: What do these variables mean?
Replies: 4
Views: 179

What do these variables mean?

I'm going through my notes and there was a line of reasoning of equations: w=FD; since F=PA then w=(PA)D=PΔV. I'm assuming that F represents force, D represents distance, and that A represents area, but I'm not too sure. The others I'm clear on. Can someone verify this for me? Thanks!
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Jan 14, 2018 10:36 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Homework help on 8.29
Replies: 4
Views: 177

Re: Homework help on 8.29

Ah, so yes. Thinking in terms of number of bonds is incorrect. It's all about the potential to store energy then. That's cool.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sat Jan 13, 2018 7:08 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Homework help on 8.29
Replies: 4
Views: 177

Re: Homework help on 8.29

Your reasoning makes sense. NO2 is more molecularly complex than NO so it would have a higher molar heat capacity.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sat Jan 13, 2018 7:02 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: When considering enthalpy (Δ H=q), is the letter "H" or "ΔH" Enthalpy?
Replies: 3
Views: 114

Re: When considering enthalpy (Δ H=q), is the letter "H" or "ΔH" Enthalpy?

H is the symbol for enthalpy, while delta H represents the change in enthalpy. Enthalpy is the measure of the internal energy of the system and shows the thermodynamic potential of the system. Internal energy is also the energy required to create the system. Delta H/the change in enthalpy is used to...
by Bansi Amin 1D
Fri Dec 08, 2017 5:36 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Smaller First Ionization Energy: Sr or Ru
Replies: 1
Views: 109

Re: Smaller First Ionization Energy: Sr or Ru

The experimentally calculated first ionization energy of Ru is approx 710 kJ/mol while the first ionization energy of Sr is approx 550 kJ/mol which does follow the periodic trend.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Fri Dec 08, 2017 5:31 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Naming of Ligands
Replies: 2
Views: 127

Re: Naming of Ligands

A monodentate ligand means that the Lewis base can only donate one electron pair to the central metal atom, while bidentate means that two electron pairs are donated by the Lewis base, and tridentate means that three bonds are formed.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Dec 03, 2017 11:35 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Is H+ a Bronsted acid?
Replies: 1
Views: 143

Re: Is H+ a Bronsted acid?

The hydrogen ion is the proton that can determine which molecule is a Brønsted acid or Brønsted base, but I don't think it itself is a Brønsted acid or base.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Dec 03, 2017 5:34 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: How do I identify if a molecule is a Bronsted Acid or Base?
Replies: 5
Views: 271

Re: How do I identify if a molecule is a Bronsted Acid or Base?

In the balanced equation, check if the amount of hydrogens increased or decreased. If there was a decrease, that means that the molecule donated the protons (in the form of the hydrogen) and is then a Brønsted acid and if the amount of the hydrogens increased then the molecule accepted the protons a...
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Nov 26, 2017 10:27 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone Pairs [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 191

Re: Lone Pairs [ENDORSED]

No, only the lone pairs on the central atom affect the bonding angles since it is more electronegative.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Nov 26, 2017 10:19 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Ligands
Replies: 2
Views: 130

Re: Ligands

A ligand is an ion or neutral atom that bonds to a central metal atom. A ligand acts as a Lewis base meaning it donates an electron pair to the central atom. They bond through coordinate bonding.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Tue Nov 14, 2017 5:48 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Relative Orientations (4.31)
Replies: 1
Views: 125

Re: Relative Orientations (4.31)

Relative orientation is the same as the VSEPR orientations for the non hybrid orbitals. Just determine them based on how many areas of electron density there are.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Nov 12, 2017 7:57 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Where to put the lone pairs?
Replies: 3
Views: 215

Re: Where to put the lone pairs?

What kind of trigonal do you mean? Planar or Bipyramidal?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Nov 12, 2017 4:07 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Textbook Problem Chp 4 #9
Replies: 3
Views: 156

Re: Textbook Problem Chp 4 #9

Trigonal planar is AX3 while the ICl3 molecule is AX3E2 which is what T- shaped is.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Nov 05, 2017 8:54 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Problem 3.59 Part A
Replies: 4
Views: 212

Re: Problem 3.59 Part A

Isn't ClO an anion?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Nov 05, 2017 8:52 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Lower in Energy? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 289

Re: Lower in Energy? [ENDORSED]

3d is higher in energy than 4s when the d orbital is empty. When 3d has an electron in it, 3d becomes lower in energy than 4s.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:13 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Placement [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 268

Re: Placement [ENDORSED]

The central atom is the one with the lowest ionization energy. Ionization energy increases from left to right and decreases from top to bottom. The central atom must be the one with the least ionization energy because it can form more bonds than the other element due to the lower ionization energy.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:07 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Noble Gases
Replies: 6
Views: 426

Re: Noble Gases

The noble gasses still cannot bond with each other though, correct? Even under extreme circumstances?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:28 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Comparing E=pc and E=.5mv^2
Replies: 3
Views: 308

Re: Comparing E=pc and E=.5mv^2

What information must be provided to determine which equation to use? Is it that E=pc can only be applied to a massless particle because the speed of light is for a massless particle/photon?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:25 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Velocity [ENDORSED]
Replies: 13
Views: 707

Re: Velocity [ENDORSED]

The speed of light can be used as velocity for massless particles like photons. Not too sure about the whole relationship part.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Oct 15, 2017 11:04 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Determining the Series [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 226

Re: Determining the Series [ENDORSED]

So when we're naming the series, do we name it from the lowest energy level? Like say the electron goes from n=3 to n=1. Would we name this as Paschen since that was the initial energy state in the problem, or do we name it as Lyman since n=1 is the lower state?
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Oct 15, 2017 10:48 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Concept // Wave-like Behavior [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 248

Re: Concept // Wave-like Behavior [ENDORSED]

So, since the emission of electrons is not dependent on the level of intensity that the light is, will changing the wavelength effect its emission? I'm assuming the its refers to electrons. With that assumption, the changing of the wavelength will effect the emission of the electron. For the electr...
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Oct 15, 2017 10:27 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Electromagnetic Spectrum for Test
Replies: 2
Views: 140

Re: Electromagnetic Spectrum for Test

I'm not entirely sure about this, but it's most likely that if we need to know specifics, the series should be provided to us. In discussion we didn't go over the specifics so it should be provided if needed in the answer.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Oct 08, 2017 2:48 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Whole Numbers, One Sig Fig [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 265

Re: Whole Numbers, One Sig Fig [ENDORSED]

Hold up, sorry, the number 50 only has two sig figs if a decimal is in place, so you'd be fine with rounding down to 50. All though I'm not sure if you'd encounter a situation where there would only be one sig fig required to be in the answer.
by Bansi Amin 1D
Sun Oct 08, 2017 2:44 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Whole Numbers, One Sig Fig [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 265

Re: Whole Numbers, One Sig Fig [ENDORSED]

The number 50 still has two sig figs, so instead you'd have to write the number 50 in scientific notation without the decimal point. So it would be written as 5 x 10^1.

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