Search found 31 matches

by Nicole 1F
Mon Mar 12, 2018 10:46 pm
Forum: *Nucleophiles
Topic: What are nucleophiles?
Replies: 2
Views: 422

What are nucleophiles?

I'm confused on what nucleophiles are. Also what type of problems will they show up in? Thanks
by Nicole 1F
Mon Mar 12, 2018 10:33 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Test #1
Replies: 4
Views: 285

Re: Test #1

Yes, that is what I put as my explanation. I also said that it was an endothermic process.
by Nicole 1F
Mon Mar 12, 2018 10:14 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Different work problems?
Replies: 2
Views: 236

Re: Different work problems?

You would use w=-PΔV for an irreversible pathway and -nRTlnV2/V1 for a reversible pathway. You solve for ΔU normally using ΔU = w +q
by Nicole 1F
Wed Mar 07, 2018 11:28 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: UA worksheet [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 136

Re: UA worksheet [ENDORSED]

-You can solve for k using the first order half life equation.
-Turn 30 days in seconds
-Use ln[A]=-kt+ln[A]initial and rearrange so that you are solving for [A]/[A]initial
-Plug in the k value and time
-Multiply what you get for [A]/[A]initial by 100 to get the percentage
by Nicole 1F
Wed Mar 07, 2018 11:21 pm
Forum: Second Order Reactions
Topic: Second Order
Replies: 3
Views: 273

Re: Second Order

Since 0.25 is half of 0.50, you can use the second order half life equation to help you with this problem. For half life, it only depends on your initial concentration, k, and t. You can see how there are different initial concentrations and because they are different you know that they will have di...
by Nicole 1F
Wed Mar 07, 2018 11:15 pm
Forum: Second Order Reactions
Topic: 15.35
Replies: 6
Views: 407

Re: 15.35

You would use the second order half life equation, which is t1/2= 1/k[A]initial to solve for k. Then plug your values into 1/[A] = kt + 1/[A]initial to find the time.
by Nicole 1F
Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:47 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Negative 1/a
Replies: 8
Views: 317

Re: Negative 1/a

In addition, the rate needs to be positive in the end.
by Nicole 1F
Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:35 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: What is the order of the reaction? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 187

Re: What is the order of the reaction? [ENDORSED]

The order of your reaction is the n value. It shows up in the differential rate law where
Rate=k[R]^n (so n=0 in a zero order reaction, n=1 in a 1st order reaction, etc)
by Nicole 1F
Tue Feb 27, 2018 12:52 am
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: Midterm 6A (Multiple Choice)
Replies: 4
Views: 319

Midterm 6A (Multiple Choice)

Question 6A Answer: C8H18(l) (at 298 K) has higher molar entropy than CH4(g), because C8H18 is a larger molecule than CH4, and larger molecules have more chemical bonds and can store energy in more ways than smaller molecules. How do you know that C8H18 has a higher molar entropy when it is a liquid...
by Nicole 1F
Tue Feb 20, 2018 7:49 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Anode/Cathode
Replies: 2
Views: 87

Re: Anode/Cathode

The anode relates to the oxidation reaction and the cathode with the reduction reaction. My TA said a way to remember this is anode and oxidation both start with vowels and cathode and reduction both start with consonants.
by Nicole 1F
Mon Feb 19, 2018 1:00 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Acidic vs. Basic
Replies: 2
Views: 125

Acidic vs. Basic

Will all the questions on the test be under acidic conditions? If not, how do you know the number of H2O and H+ molecules you add under acidic conditions and how many H2O and OH- molecules you add when the reaction is under basic conditions?
by Nicole 1F
Mon Feb 19, 2018 12:53 am
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: E vs E naught
Replies: 3
Views: 290

Re: E vs E naught

Yes, E°is under standard conditions (at 1 atm and 25°C) just like G°.
by Nicole 1F
Mon Feb 19, 2018 12:47 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Standard Reduction Potential
Replies: 3
Views: 148

Re: Standard Reduction Potential

I think because standard reduction potential is an intensive property so the amount that the reaction occurs doesn't matter.
by Nicole 1F
Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:35 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Qrev
Replies: 2
Views: 240

Re: Qrev

The "rev" part means that the reaction is reversible. Reversible reactions are ideal and happen at equilibrium.
by Nicole 1F
Tue Feb 13, 2018 1:30 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: delta u [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 218

Re: delta u [ENDORSED]

^Yes, everything you said is correct. ΔU=0 for an isothermal process.
by Nicole 1F
Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:34 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: disorder & entropy
Replies: 2
Views: 118

Re: disorder & entropy

Adding on, the equation S=KblnW shows that with more microstates (W=number of microstates^# of particles in the system), there is an increase in entropy.
by Nicole 1F
Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:28 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Today's Review Session #9.35
Replies: 1
Views: 207

Today's Review Session #9.35

Today in the midterm review session we talked about Problem 9.35 and how Container A and Container C actually have the same entropy. I'm unclear on how for Container C, C= 3/2 R. I understand that you add something onto 5/2R but after that I'm confused. Thanks for the help
by Nicole 1F
Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:15 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Box 9.6
Replies: 1
Views: 88

Re: Box 9.6

I think the C values are different because now you are in a different phase and there are specific C values for each phase. For example with water: The molar heat capacity of liquid water = 75.29 J·K-1·mol-1, the molar heat capacity of ice is 37.1 J·K-1·mol-1, and the molar heat capacity of water va...
by Nicole 1F
Fri Feb 02, 2018 3:56 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: Van't Hoff Eq.
Replies: 5
Views: 402

Re: Van't Hoff Eq.

Can someone please explain what it means for ∆S°to be constant? I think Dr. Lavelle was explaining this at the end of lecture (something to do with the difference not changing between the two ∆S° values), but I didn't quite catch it all. Thanks!
by Nicole 1F
Fri Feb 02, 2018 3:47 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: When to use Q versus K [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 529

When to use Q versus K [ENDORSED]

When do you use the equation ΔG= ∆G°+ RTlnQ versus ΔG= ∆G°+ RTlnK?
by Nicole 1F
Thu Feb 01, 2018 12:56 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Adiabatic [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 197

Re: Adiabatic [ENDORSED]

I'm not completely sure but I believe that your reasoning is correct. Adiabatic means that no heat is gained or lost by the system, so q does equal zero and energy is only transferred as work.
by Nicole 1F
Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:24 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Reversible vs Irreversible
Replies: 2
Views: 133

Re: Reversible vs Irreversible

Would someone be able to provide an example for when reversible reactions are isothermal and an example of when they are not? I'm a little confused...Thanks!
by Nicole 1F
Wed Jan 24, 2018 7:12 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Homework Problem 8.67
Replies: 3
Views: 166

Re: Homework Problem 8.67

For Part b of this problem, what does "atomize" mean/refer to in the solutions manual? Thanks!
by Nicole 1F
Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:59 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Calorimetry
Replies: 4
Views: 173

Re: Calorimetry

You can leave the temperature in degrees Celsius.
by Nicole 1F
Fri Jan 19, 2018 4:09 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Isolated system
Replies: 3
Views: 206

Re: Isolated system

ΔU=0 in an isolated system. Energy cannot be transferred between the system and surroundings.
by Nicole 1F
Fri Jan 19, 2018 3:58 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Integral from Today's Lecture
Replies: 3
Views: 143

Integral from Today's Lecture

From today's lecture, we learned about an integral you can use to "sum an infinite number of steps" regarding expansion. (Integral: W=- V1∫ V2 P dv). I'm confused what this means and what it is used for. Would someone be able to explain? Thanks!
by Nicole 1F
Fri Jan 19, 2018 3:45 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Difference between Closed and Isolated
Replies: 10
Views: 713

Re: Difference between Closed and Isolated

A closed system can share heat, whereas an isolated system cannot. Both cannot share particles with their surroundings.
by Nicole 1F
Sun Jan 14, 2018 7:53 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Recording Lectures
Replies: 2
Views: 187

Recording Lectures

For anyone that was in Dr. Lavelle's 14A class, has he given permission to record his lectures (to use if we don't catch something from the PowerPoint or for studying for tests/midterm...never to post anywhere/distribute)? Thanks!
by Nicole 1F
Sun Jan 14, 2018 5:44 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Standard Reaction Enthalpy Definition
Replies: 7
Views: 182

Re: Standard Reaction Enthalpy Definition

I don't think that it has to always be at that temperature. A majority of the times, it is at 25 degrees Celsius/298 Kelvin. However, the temperature can vary if the reaction is stated at a specified temperature of interest.
by Nicole 1F
Sun Jan 14, 2018 5:35 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Isolated vs Closed Systems
Replies: 2
Views: 100

Re: Isolated vs Closed Systems

A closed system can exchange energy with its surroundings whereas an isolated system cannot. An example of a closed system is an ice pack (heat is transferred) and an example of an isolated system is a thermos with hot soup in it (heat cannot flow out of the system).

Go to advanced search