Search found 25 matches

by Rithik Kumar 3E
Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:24 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Thursday discussion canceled? and other questions
Replies: 3
Views: 302

Re: Thursday discussion canceled? and other questions

I believe that the TA review sessions might be canceled. As per Dr.Lavelle's recent email: "Given the progress on the local fire containment the following 7 hours are offered today (Thursday): Office hours: 3-5pm and 4:45-6:45pm in Young Hall 4222 Peer Learning Sessions: 6-9pm in Hedrick Hall, ...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Tue Dec 05, 2017 8:17 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Chemical equation for dissociation of strong acids
Replies: 2
Views: 182

Re: Chemical equation for dissociation of strong acids

I think technically it is supposed to be a single arrow because during lecture, Dr.Lavelle said that strong acids dissociate completely in solution. But I believe he also mentioned something about still putting double arrows for these reactions (as thats what is given within the assigned homework pr...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:45 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming
Replies: 3
Views: 179

Re: Naming

As stated above, I believe we have to memorize the prefixes and the names of the ligands for the test. This information can be found on Table 17.4 in the book. In addition looking in the document provided above and going over example molecules and their names helps solidify some of the rules and con...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:42 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Finding Coordination Number
Replies: 6
Views: 290

Re: Finding Coordination Number

Also, I think a quick way to determine the coordination numbers of a metal or Lewis acid in a molecule is to see how many ligands are bond to the central metal. The number of ligands bond to the metal is synonymous to the number of bonds in a coordination sphere.
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:40 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Charge of a Ligand
Replies: 2
Views: 132

Re: Charge of a Ligand

Yes, most of the common polyatomic ligands need to be memorized. Table 17.4 outlines all of the ligands that we need for homework problems, I believe, and also include their latin names. However, as stated above, for ligands such as (F-) or (Cl-) the charge of the ligand is the same as the charge of...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:32 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Polydentate
Replies: 3
Views: 180

Re: Polydentate

You can also draw out the Lewis structure of the molecule in question. After creating the proper structure, you should identify those atoms with a lone pair. These atoms will be able to form a bond and thereby can be monodentate (if only one of these atoms are present) or polydentate (if multiple of...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:28 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Oxidation State [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 164

Re: Oxidation State [ENDORSED]

I believe that to determine the oxidation state of an atom, you can use the formula which states that "(Overall molecular charge) = (# of metals)(oxidation number of metal) + [Summation of (#number of ligands)(charge of the ligand)]. You can kind of think of the process as a way of adding the c...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Mon Nov 27, 2017 10:08 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Conversions- Gases
Replies: 3
Views: 198

Re: Conversions- Gases

In addition, conversion factors for "atm" to "kPa" for example are provided within the constants and equations sheet that we are provided with each exam.
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Mon Nov 27, 2017 9:17 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Pressure and Concentration in PV=nRT
Replies: 2
Views: 359

Re: Pressure and Concentration in PV=nRT

The relationship stated above is correct. In addition, if you think of the situation of pressure and concentration conceptually, it makes sense as well. If the amount of moles of a molecule in the volume container (with a constant temperature) increases, the pressure of the gas increases. This is be...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Mon Nov 27, 2017 5:34 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 4.13
Replies: 2
Views: 157

Re: 4.13

I agree with the above response. Although the formal charge maybe better in your structure, molecules prioritize an octet on the central atom and in general - this is the most stable structure for molecule.
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Mon Nov 27, 2017 5:28 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Seesaw molecular shape
Replies: 4
Views: 521

Re: Seesaw molecular shape

A seesaw molecular shape is achieved if a molecule has 4 electron bonding regions (bonds) about the central atom and one lone pair. This is because the original trigonal bipyramidal shape is changed as the bond angles within the non-axial regions are affected by the presence of a lone pair.
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Mon Nov 27, 2017 5:24 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angles
Replies: 4
Views: 197

Re: Bond Angles

I believe that with this unit in general, Dr.Lavelle emphasized that we should come to understand each of the molecular structures. Knowing the arrangements and shapes will allow us to draw conclusions about bond angles and how they are affected by lone pairs. I think it might be better if we unders...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Mon Nov 27, 2017 5:16 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Seesaw
Replies: 2
Views: 162

Re: Seesaw

To help with figuring out the bond angles, it helps to draw out the initial Lewis Structure of a given molecule. This structure indicates the amount of bonding regions about a central atom and thereby directs you to its relative molecular shape. Knowing the basic arrangement of the trigonal bipyrami...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Wed Nov 15, 2017 1:07 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Difference Between Orbitals and Subshells [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 572

Re: Difference Between Orbitals and Subshells [ENDORSED]

The subshell describes the particular shape of an orbital. For example, the orbitals in the s subshell have a spherical shape while the orbitals in the p subshells have a nodal shape. Hence the quantum numbers help us identify and gain a better understanding of a specific electron within an atom. Th...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Wed Nov 15, 2017 1:02 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Magnetic Quantum Numbers [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 364

Re: Magnetic Quantum Numbers [ENDORSED]

The value of the quantum number ml relates to the relative orientation of the electron in the specified orbital. For example, when completing electron configurations and diagrams, the positive and negative ml values represent two potential electrons of opposite spin in an orbital of a particular sub...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Wed Nov 15, 2017 12:59 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Lower in Energy? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 260

Re: Lower in Energy? [ENDORSED]

If we consider an elementary model of atoms and their quantum structure I believe we should use the principal quantum value or the "n value" to determine the relative levels of energy. However, it should be taken into consideration that, for example, the 3d orbital is higher in energy than...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Wed Nov 15, 2017 12:55 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Subshells
Replies: 3
Views: 230

Re: Subshells

I agree with the above posts. However, I believe that this course restricts us to consider orbital shapes up to the d and f orbitals or (l=2 and 3). As a general rule of thumb, however, as your "l" value increases, the orbital shape's complexity increases.
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Thu Nov 02, 2017 10:06 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Subshells [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 191

Re: Subshells [ENDORSED]

Subshells in essence represent the unique "type" or "shape" of the orbitals. For example, the "s" subshell has a relatively spherical shape because the electron probability density as seen through the Schrodinger equation dictates relatively equal density, whereas the &...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:50 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Effective Nuclear Charge [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 358

Re: Effective Nuclear Charge [ENDORSED]

Effective nuclear charge can tell us a lot about periodic trends. For example, as you move across a period, the effective nuclear charge increases as the number of protons increases while the relative number of shielding electrons stays the same. This signifies the notion that the proton's pull is b...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Fri Oct 27, 2017 10:23 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Exceptions [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 281

Re: Exceptions [ENDORSED]

Copper and Chromium are the only exceptions we need to be aware of as of now. They are exceptions due to the small difference in energy between the 3d and 4s orbitals. Thus it would be energetically stable for the 3d orbitals to be either half filled or fully filled as oppose to the 4s orbital being...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Fri Oct 27, 2017 10:20 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Abbreviating e- configurations [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 416

Re: Abbreviating e- configurations [ENDORSED]

That would be the short hand e- configuration method in which the noble gas of the previous period is used to limit the longevity of the electron configuration. However, I think the method by which we write the e- configuration will be made specific within the individual questions. I agree with the ...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Tue Oct 17, 2017 4:59 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: The negative sign
Replies: 2
Views: 179

Re: The negative sign

I agree with the above post. To reiterate, the way that the Rydberg equation is set up, we will get a negative change in energy if the radiation generated by a transition is going from a higher to lower energy level and thereby releasing energy. For example, the frequency of the radiation generated ...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:39 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Lyman and Balmer series.
Replies: 4
Views: 259

Re: Lyman and Balmer series.

I believe we might need to know the relative wavelengths associated with each of the series. For example, since the Balmer series includes the visible light spectrum it has relatively greater wavelengths than that of the Lyman series (which contains the ultraviolet spectrum). This general informatio...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Fri Oct 06, 2017 7:59 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Theoretical Yield [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 377

Re: Theoretical Yield [ENDORSED]

Theoretical yield is defined as the maximum possible amount of product produced relative to the limiting reactant. Solving for the maximum product that can be produced once the limiting reactant is found can lead you to the theoretical yield. However, many questions ask about the percent yield which...
by Rithik Kumar 3E
Fri Oct 06, 2017 5:04 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Balancing Chemical equations too slow... any advice? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 18
Views: 1490

Re: Balancing Chemical equations too slow... any advice? [ENDORSED]

For larger chemical equations it might be easier to cronstruct two tables (one for the reactants and one for the products) that list out the individual elements involved in the reaction. Start by noting down the number of moles of each element of the unbalanced equation for both sides of the reactio...

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