Search found 21 matches

by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Dec 10, 2017 12:05 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Memorizing all the names???
Replies: 4
Views: 354

Re: Memorizing all the names???

My discussion's TA advised that either way would probably be ok.
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:10 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Identifying Ligands
Replies: 1
Views: 220

Identifying Ligands

When we are asked to identify the ligands in a coordination compound, would we write the charge of the ligand as well?
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:01 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Polydentates
Replies: 4
Views: 328

Re: Polydentates

Yeah Emily is right. My discussion's TA taught us that biological compounds with lone pairs (typically from N or O) would act as polydentates. However, he suggested that memorizing table 17.4 should suffice.
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Dec 03, 2017 9:05 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: ICE Box
Replies: 3
Views: 326

Re: ICE Box

If the question gives you the pressures for all of the substances in the reaction (both the reactants and products), calculate Q and compare Q to K. If Q > K then X will be negative for the products and positive for the reactants as the reaction favors the formation of reactants. If Q < K then X wil...
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:42 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: When can a tetrahedral be non polar? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 281

Re: When can a tetrahedral be non polar? [ENDORSED]

Yes, Ethan is correct. Also remember the same goes for linear, trigonal planar, tetrahedral, square planar, trigonal bipyramidal, and octahedral configurations. Make sure all the binding atoms are the same!!
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:31 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Ch 4 Question 75
Replies: 3
Views: 229

Re: Ch 4 Question 75

Also, it helps to remember that a molecule is only nonpolar if it is linear, trigonal planar, tetrahedral, square planar, trigonal bipyramidal, or octahedral. However, in order for a molecule to be nonpolar, the binding atoms must also all be the same!!
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:17 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Coordination Compounds
Replies: 8
Views: 321

Re: Naming Coordination Compounds

Another thing to remember is that if the symbol of the metal originates from a Latin name (as listed in appendix 2D), it will have a unique name. For example, an anionic compound with "Fe" would have the name "------ferrate" NOT "------ironate". This is stated in toolbo...
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Nov 26, 2017 10:56 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: solvents in K
Replies: 3
Views: 141

Re: solvents in K

In his module, Dr. Lavelle also stated that solvents are not used in equilibrium constant calculations as their change in concentration would be extremely insignificant.
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Nov 26, 2017 9:47 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Chemical Equilibrium
Replies: 2
Views: 130

Re: Chemical Equilibrium

Also, solvents are not included when finding the equilibrium constant as their change in concentration would be extremely insignificant due to their excess.
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:31 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angle answers
Replies: 2
Views: 123

Re: Bond Angle answers

I believe we will lose points if we do not specify that the bond angle is less than a certain degree. From the practice problems, all answers stated less than or an exact angle.
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:04 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lewis Structures and VSEPR Shape
Replies: 4
Views: 198

Re: Lewis Structures and VSEPR Shape

Dr. Lavelle stated during lecture that you do NOT need to draw the Lewis Structure to reflect the molecular shape. It would be very beneficial to do so but it is not required.
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Nov 12, 2017 9:26 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: atomic structure of HOCO
Replies: 8
Views: 325

Re: atomic structure of HOCO

Typically for organic molecules like this, the compound is bonded how it is written. So H is bonded to O then to C and then to O.
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Nov 12, 2017 9:18 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal charge and most electronegative element
Replies: 3
Views: 907

Re: Formal charge and most electronegative element

If a certain Lewis Structure has an uneven distribution of charges (uneven distribution defined as not all atoms having a formal charge of 0) then the most electronegative atom will typically have a negative formal charge. A TA explained that this would depict a more stable resonance as the more ele...
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Nov 05, 2017 8:35 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge For Element In The Middle [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 295

Re: Formal Charge For Element In The Middle [ENDORSED]

The central atom does not necessarily need to have a formal charge of 0. However, having the central atom have a formal charge of 0 will typically lead to an balanced/favored Lewis Structure.
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Nov 05, 2017 8:29 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge
Replies: 8
Views: 404

Re: Formal Charge

The formal charge does not always need to equal 0 for the Lewis Structure to be favorable. If the compound has an overall charge (for example, OH^-) then the overall formal charge between all elements will be -1. What makes a Lewis Structure favorable is its ability to have the lowest formal charge ...
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:45 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Across a period vs. Down a group
Replies: 3
Views: 218

Re: Across a period vs. Down a group

Typically, if we need to know, the atomic radii will be given to us already. In my high school chemistry class, if we ever compared the different ionization energies between two elements these values were usually given to us (either on the back of our periodic table or in the problem). I'd assume th...
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:27 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Ionization Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 205

Re: Ionization Energy

Another way to see it is as atomic radius increases, ionization energy decreases. Since the atomic radius of elements increases as we move down a group and towards the left side of a period, it is safe to assume that the ionization energy, the energy required to remove an electron from an atom, decr...
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Oct 22, 2017 10:09 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Difference Between Work Function and the Energy Required to Remove an Electron from one Atom [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 324

Re: Difference Between Work Function and the Energy Required to Remove an Electron from one Atom [ENDORSED]

I agree with MitchellMologne. Although subtle, the question did ask for the energy of a single atom. A great way to tell if you need to calculate energy for a single atom is to look at the units they give for the work function. In this case it was KJ/mol. The "mol" aspect can be an indicat...
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:59 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Work Function [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 271

Re: Work Function [ENDORSED]

Here's an equation to help visualize it. (Energy of Photon)>(Work Function) ======> (Ejection of Electron). Note that if the energy of the incoming photon IS greater than the work function, then the ejected electron will have excess energy (aka kinetic energy).
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sat Oct 07, 2017 11:37 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Calculating ratios when finding molecular formulas [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 189

Re: Calculating ratios when finding molecular formulas [ENDORSED]

Yeah, Christy is right. You are more than likely to obtain whole numbers for your molecular formula. If this doesn't happen, chances are you made an error during your calculation.
by Gobinder Pandher 3J
Sat Oct 07, 2017 11:30 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Molarity unit [ENDORSED]
Replies: 11
Views: 752

Re: Molarity unit [ENDORSED]

Molarity is defined as the moles of solute per liter of solution. I don't think you'll ever see molarity as moles/mL. I hope this helps.

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