Search found 21 matches

by Mikaila 3E
Thu Dec 07, 2017 12:50 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: lewis vs. bronsted
Replies: 1
Views: 111

Re: lewis vs. bronsted

Lewis acids/bases are talking about electrons while Bronsted-Lowry acids/bases are talking about hydrogen ions (H+). Remember that Lewis acids are electron pair acceptors while Lewis bases are electron pair donors. Bronsted acids are H+ donors and Bronsted bases are H+ acceptors.
by Mikaila 3E
Thu Dec 07, 2017 12:46 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Chemotheraphy Examples [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 343

Re: Chemotheraphy Examples [ENDORSED]

Also, the cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) can bind better to DNA due to the location of the chlorines. The lewis structure of this compound results in the chlorines on the same side (hence the name cis-) rather than opposite sides (trans-).
by Mikaila 3E
Fri Dec 01, 2017 11:51 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: 17.33 (a)
Replies: 2
Views: 124

Re: 17.33 (a)

There is a table in the textbook that would be good to memorize. If all else fails, you could draw it out and see how many lone pairs there are and that will help you determine if it is a polydentate.
by Mikaila 3E
Fri Dec 01, 2017 11:48 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Chromium as a cation
Replies: 2
Views: 128

Re: Chromium as a cation

Chromium is a transition metal and the name changes occur when the overall charge is negative. You would change the name to chromate if there was a negative charge.
by Mikaila 3E
Sat Nov 25, 2017 9:48 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structures
Replies: 3
Views: 190

Re: Lewis Structures

Also for that question, remember to put the radical on the element with the least electronegativity.
by Mikaila 3E
Sat Nov 25, 2017 9:44 am
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Net moles produced (Test question)
Replies: 3
Views: 201

Re: Net moles produced (Test question)

Since it is asking for "net" moles, all you have to do is add up the moles of reactants and the moles of the products and subtract the two numbers.
by Mikaila 3E
Sat Nov 18, 2017 8:55 am
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Limiting Reactant vs Theoretical Yield
Replies: 3
Views: 422

Re: Limiting Reactant vs Theoretical Yield

You would have to find the limiting reactant in order to determine the theoretical yield. In other words, to find the theoretical yield, you would still go through the same steps as the finding the limiting reactant.
by Mikaila 3E
Sat Nov 18, 2017 8:17 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electroegativity
Replies: 9
Views: 400

Re: Electroegativity

While this doesn't concern the entire periodic table, remembering that most of the noble gases have no electronegativity because they have a full valence shell of electrons, thus are not likely to add or don't want another electron to accept. Otherwise, knowing the trend is really helpful.
by Mikaila 3E
Fri Nov 10, 2017 2:56 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Relation of radius/diameter size to precision
Replies: 3
Views: 175

Re: Relation of radius/diameter size to precision

Converting units is a preference thing. I prefer to convert my units at the beginning so I don't forget at the end but if you prefer to work only in certain units, then that is fine too. The important part is to have the correct final answer in the correct units.
by Mikaila 3E
Thu Nov 09, 2017 4:07 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Central Atom? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 328

Re: Central Atom? [ENDORSED]

Hydrogen is not the central atom because it only has one bond meaning it can only bond with one atom. Because of this, Hydrogen has to be placed on the atoms towards the outside of the molecule. If Hydrogen is the central atom, there is only one other atom it can bond with but there are molecules th...
by Mikaila 3E
Thu Nov 02, 2017 3:13 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Order of subshells
Replies: 1
Views: 124

Re: Order of subshells

4s has higher energy than 3d when there is an electron in the 3d subshell. The 4s is only lower in energy if there are no electrons in the 3d subshell hence why the 4s is filled before the 3d. For example, potassium has an electron configuration of [Ar] 4s1. But if we go into the 3d subshell and loo...
by Mikaila 3E
Thu Nov 02, 2017 3:03 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Order of Orbitals
Replies: 10
Views: 381

Re: Order of Orbitals

It is also helpful to write it in the order of increasing n-values (shell) when writing the electron configurations for ions. The electrons in the highest energy level are the ones that get added to or removed, not the lower energy levels.
by Mikaila 3E
Sat Oct 28, 2017 1:48 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 240

Re: Electronegativity [ENDORSED]

The periodic trend for determine if something has high electronegativity is to the right and and top of the periodic table. In other words, as you go to the right and to the top of the periodic table, the higher electronegativity will be. For example, Fluorine has high electronegativity because it h...
by Mikaila 3E
Sat Oct 28, 2017 1:35 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: D-block valence electrons? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 981

Re: D-block valence electrons? [ENDORSED]

I think zinc only has 2 valence electrons because the electron configuration would be as follows: [Ar] 3d10 4s2. The 4s is the higher energy level (meaning the n is bigger) than the 3d energy level. In other words, 4s2 is the outermost shell. Because of this, there are only 2 valence electrons.
by Mikaila 3E
Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:12 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: D-Orbital
Replies: 4
Views: 257

Re: D-Orbital

I don't think the d-orbitals need subscripts.
by Mikaila 3E
Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:11 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: quantum numbers [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 253

Re: quantum numbers [ENDORSED]

What this means is that the rows correspond to n. For example, Sodium is in the third row and it is in the 3rd sub-shell thus its electron configuration is [Ne] 3s^1. (The [Ne] is there since Neon is the last noble gas in the previous row) If it is in the second row, the 2nd sub-shell (2s^how ever m...
by Mikaila 3E
Fri Oct 20, 2017 8:56 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Energy Levels
Replies: 3
Views: 198

Re: Energy Levels

An electron cannot be between two energy levels; n is a discrete, whole number, thus the energy of the incoming photon has to be the exact energy difference if an electron is to change levels.
by Mikaila 3E
Thu Oct 12, 2017 12:40 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Exited state
Replies: 5
Views: 287

Re: Exited state

You can also think of it as electrons (being negatively charged) are attracted to the protons in the nucleus so they won't be able to stand being far away from them for a long period of time due to them being unstable. To be stable, the electron must return to the ground state. An electron can go in...
by Mikaila 3E
Thu Oct 12, 2017 12:25 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Prefix Conversion
Replies: 12
Views: 437

Re: Prefix Conversion

Sophia brings up a good point. For me, I think it's up to you and how you prefer to see your numbers/units. I tend to convert my units at the beginning so I don't forget to convert them at the end after all the calculations have been made.
by Mikaila 3E
Thu Oct 05, 2017 5:20 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Formula units E.9
Replies: 2
Views: 205

Re: Formula units E.9

I was wondering about that too. Formula units show the lowest ratio number of ions in the ionic compound. And if I understand correctly, 6.02*10^23 formula units equal 1 mol so it is similar to using atoms and molecules depending on what the substance is. This is an example I found from a website. h...
by Mikaila 3E
Thu Oct 05, 2017 4:54 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Molar Mass
Replies: 7
Views: 644

Re: Molar Mass

I confuse these two terms along with Molarity (M). Is there any way you guys distinguish these terms? Thank you in advance! Molar mass is the mass per mole. Molecular weight is different considering that it is a weight and not a mass. It's measurement is based on the gravitational pull. Molarity is...

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