Search found 49 matches

by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu Jun 14, 2018 9:42 am
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Carbon Dioxide and respiratory acidosis
Replies: 2
Views: 149

Re: Carbon Dioxide and respiratory acidosis

respiratory acidosis is when the ph of blood becomes acidic and this is because there is excess Carbon dioxide in the Lungs.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:56 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals
Replies: 1
Views: 77

Re: Orbitals

is the number of orbitals of a subshell s= 0 p= -1,0,1 d=-2,-1,0,1,2 f=-3,-2,-1,0,1,2, -3 a) so you got 5d you look at the angular momentum quantum number= 2 (which is d) the d subshell can have 10 electrons, but we can pair these electrons together. Therefore, you have 5 different available orienta...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:34 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: french toast #15
Replies: 3
Views: 127

Re: french toast #15

Angular is another way of saying bent
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:58 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Order of acidity or basicity
Replies: 2
Views: 174

Re: Order of acidity or basicity

I found a video that is very helpful. The last few examples they do are irrelevant for this course since we didn't go over pka or ka in depth. Hope it helps!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdqFSw_SRug
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:22 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: final [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 232

Re: final [ENDORSED]

no, we did not cover this in class
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:27 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: basics of hybridization
Replies: 18
Views: 412

Re: basics of hybridization

I understand how to calculate hybridization, but I don't understand what it means. Can anyone help? A simple way you can think of Hybridization is where two orbitals are coming together to create a new atomic orbital to fit all the number of electrons. In terms of the final, I believe Lavelle will ...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Sun Jun 10, 2018 3:31 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Coordination number
Replies: 10
Views: 239

Re: Coordination number

The number of atoms attached to the central atom, this does not include lone pairs. double bonds and triple bonds only count as 1 for example

SO2 coordination number=2
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Sun Jun 10, 2018 2:33 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Heme complex structure_coordination number
Replies: 1
Views: 45

Re: Heme complex structure_coordination number

the solid and dotted lines are to represent the tetrahedral shape. Where the solid lines are representing that the N atom is sticking out. The dotted line represents the N going toward the back. Coordination number is the number of atoms/molecules the central atom is holding on to. In this case Fe i...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Sun Jun 10, 2018 2:27 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: How to identify a Bronsted acid or base
Replies: 11
Views: 324

Re: How to identify a Bronsted acid or base

Jordanmarshall wrote:so what is the difference between Bronsted acid and bases vs Lewis acids and bases?


this website helped me out a bit:

http://leah4sci.com/arrhenius-bronsted- ... chemistry/

hope it will too!
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Sun Jun 10, 2018 2:12 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: How to identify a Bronsted acid or base
Replies: 11
Views: 324

Re: How to identify a Bronsted acid or base

I believe we will have to identify the Bronsted acid/base and Lewis acid/base in reactions, but not through their name. For J1 you can create your own reaction since they are in a solution of water. ex HNO3 + H20 -> NO3^- + H30^+ acid base conjugate base conjugate acid Therefore, HNO3 is a Bronsted ...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Sun Jun 10, 2018 1:04 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Help on HW#4.9 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 73

Re: Help on HW#4.9 [ENDORSED]

Yes, that is correct. It would also be T-shaped because of the arrangement of the 2 lone pairs. (:
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:51 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Conjugate Acids and Bases
Replies: 4
Views: 82

Re: Conjugate Acids and Bases

an example would be:

HNO3 + HPO4^2- -> NO3^- + H2PO4^-
acid + base conjugate base + conjugate acid

HNO3 -H^+ =NO3^-
HPO4^2 +H^+ = H2P04^-
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:34 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR
Replies: 7
Views: 126

Re: VSEPR

For VSEPR, when you're trying to determine the shape based off of the # of regions of electron density, would you count a double bond as ONE region of electron density or TWO regions of electron density? And would you only count the number of regions of electron densities around the central atom to...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:21 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 4.21 partc
Replies: 1
Views: 44

Re: 4.21 partc

Hi Husnia,
Right! The double bonds are the reason for smaller bond angles (103 degrees). The P-O bond needs more space so it causes the P-CL bonds to move closer together to reach 103 degrees.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Wed Jun 06, 2018 7:07 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Le Chatelier's
Replies: 1
Views: 145

Re: Le Chatelier's

Lavelle won't cover this, but a quick description is: if one side of a reaction falls out of equilibrium due to a variety of changes(temp, concentration etc.), the counter side (the side that did not get affected by the change) will try to match the side that did fall out of equilibrium, which will ...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Wed Jun 06, 2018 6:14 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Notes Needed!!
Replies: 3
Views: 162

Re: Notes Needed!!

June 4th
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Wed Jun 06, 2018 6:13 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Notes Needed!!
Replies: 3
Views: 162

Re: Notes Needed!!

June 1st
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu May 31, 2018 3:27 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Relationship between Sigma and Pi bondss
Replies: 2
Views: 166

Re: Relationship between Sigma and Pi bondss

Hi Melissa, I believe it is because sigma bonds can't overlap one another. There can be 2 Pi bonds because they are 90 degrees from each other and don't overlap and just a reminder to follow these rules too: single covalent bond has -1 sigma bond Double covalent bond has- 1 sigma bond and 1 pi bond ...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu May 31, 2018 2:58 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 4.5 Confusion
Replies: 5
Views: 92

Re: 4.5 Confusion

Hi Hussein,
ClO2+ does have a bent shape because of the lone pair, but the arrangement of molecules around the chlorine makes it a trigonal planar.
hope this helps!
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu May 31, 2018 2:34 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: VSEPR
Replies: 11
Views: 347

Re: VSEPR

Also, the VSEPR model is used for predicting the molecular geometry.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu May 24, 2018 10:58 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Question for Exams [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 219

Re: Question for Exams [ENDORSED]

A t.a told me to be mindful of the electronegativity but we don't have to memorize it.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu May 24, 2018 10:53 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Polar Vs. Non-Polar
Replies: 7
Views: 162

Re: Polar Vs. Non-Polar

Endri Dis 1J wrote:Can someone give an example of a polar covalent bond?


Hi Endri,
here is one:
C-Cl, Carbon has an electronegativity of 2.5 and Chlorine has an electronegativity of 3= 0.5 which is a polar covalent bond between the two.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Tue May 22, 2018 11:18 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Do all covalent bonds have dipole nature?
Replies: 1
Views: 68

Re: Do all covalent bonds have dipole nature?

Do all covalent bonds have dipole nature or are some covalent bonds, like C-H, so similar in electronegativity that they do not have any dipole nature? Where is the cut off if this is the case? Hi Noah, I believe in order to have an electric dipole movement one of the rules is that the molecule has...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Tue May 22, 2018 10:43 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Ions
Replies: 4
Views: 116

Re: Ions

When given a formula with a charge, how do we know which atom to apply the charge to? Hi Victoria! Is this what you mean, if there was a charge on a molecule such as a tetrahydroborate ion- BH4^- or otherwise known as [BH4]^- you give the charge to the whole molecule so: Boron has= 3 electrons Hydr...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Tue May 22, 2018 10:50 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Radical
Replies: 3
Views: 75

Re: Radical

I assume that the radical would go onto the atom that needs it to either fill an octet or to create a formal charge of 0.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu May 17, 2018 4:59 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: How to tell which elements will be most likely to form a covalent bond
Replies: 8
Views: 158

Re: How to tell which elements will be most likely to form a covalent bond

If you're given a list of elements such as K and Cl H and O Al and Mg K and Na how do you tell which elements will most likely form a covalent bond? These are the bonds I got after doing the calculations, Please correct me if I am wrong! K and Cl=ionic bond H and O = covalent bond Al and Mg= covale...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Wed May 16, 2018 4:07 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: formal charge on central atom
Replies: 3
Views: 95

Re: formal charge on central atom

NabilaNizam-1K wrote:Does the formal charge of the central atom affect the overall charge of the molecule?


If the central atom happens to be anything below or above 0, then it will affect the overall charge of the molecule.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Wed May 16, 2018 2:51 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Bonds between 1.5 and 2 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 110

Re: Bonds between 1.5 and 2 [ENDORSED]

If there is a metal involved in the formula when calculating the electronegativity and the answer is between 1.5-2.0 then it is ionic. If a nonmetal is involved and the electronegativity is between 1.5-2.0 it is polar/covalent. Why is the bond polar/covalent for nonmetals and ionic for metals?
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Fri May 11, 2018 9:47 am
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: E=R(1/n-1/n)?
Replies: 7
Views: 229

Re: E=R(1/n-1/n)?

If a problem states energy was emitted would the final answer be negative and if the problem asks energy was absorbed would the final answer be positive?
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Fri May 11, 2018 9:25 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge: Lewis dot structures
Replies: 6
Views: 130

Formal Charge: Lewis dot structures

Can someone explain how to find the formal charge for elements in Lewis dot structures? If you can include an example that would be very helpful
Thank you in advance!
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu May 10, 2018 8:58 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Help on 2.31
Replies: 1
Views: 83

Re: Help on 2.31

Hi, This question revolves around the periodic subshells s, p,d, and f blocks. a) 2d, does not exist because there are only 3d,4d, and the 5d block b) 4d, does exist on the periodic table c) 4g, does not exist on this periodic table; the table only goes up to the f block d) 6f, does not exist becaus...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Sat May 05, 2018 9:15 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: In class problem 5/4
Replies: 3
Views: 153

Re: In class problem 5/4

Q. No electrons are emitted from the surface of the metal until the frequency of the radiation reaches 2.50 times 10^16 Hz. How much energy is required to remove the electron from the metal surface I did get the correct answer for this part which was 1.66x10^-17 J Q. In the first question what is t...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Wed May 02, 2018 10:30 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: 2.19
Replies: 3
Views: 88

Re: 2.19

How do we know how many subshells there are when we are given an n value? For example, "How many subshells are there in the shell with n=4?" Hi, I use this method: subshells are the L (orbital angular momentum), to figure out the L: look at them as levels. Start at 0 and continue writing ...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Tue May 01, 2018 9:29 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Shielding (H.W 2.37 part b)
Replies: 2
Views: 131

Re: Electron Shielding (H.W 2.37 part b)

Hi Kaleb, The term "penetration" means the electrons are able to get close to the nucleus of an atom, so electrons in the S-orbital do a better job of shielding the positive charge (the negatively charged electrons in the orbitals are attracted to the protons in the nucleus ) because they ...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Tue May 01, 2018 8:53 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Cr and Cu exceptions
Replies: 3
Views: 98

Re: Cr and Cu exceptions

I assumed the elements in the same group as Cu and Cr will behave similarly in order to be stable, but only those under Cu have the special rule and Mo under Cr. Can someone explain this? Also emphasizing Valeria's question, "Also, is it possible this same thing can happen but instead of the d ...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:33 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Fourth Quantum Number
Replies: 5
Views: 109

Re: Fourth Quantum Number

I think if the question specifically asks, but its pretty staight forward; it's just asking if the electron spin is up or down.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:11 am
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Rydberg Constant [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 170

Re: Rydberg Constant [ENDORSED]

This website helped me understand the different constants : https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-impor ... d-its-uses
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:43 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration of Ag
Replies: 3
Views: 246

Re: Electron Configuration of Ag

I'm sure the professor will go over it, but from what I can remember it has to do with atom stability.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu Apr 19, 2018 4:32 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: 1.9
Replies: 6
Views: 117

Re: 1.9

I have stumbled on the frequency part; How would you convert MHz to Hz?
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Tue Apr 17, 2018 3:48 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Converting eV to J
Replies: 4
Views: 142

Re: Converting eV to J

Hello, I found 1 eV = 1.602176565e-19 J, so i believe you would multiply the amount of eVs they give to 1.602176565e-19 J
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Tue Apr 17, 2018 3:45 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]
Replies: 113
Views: 32992

Re: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]

Can we have more time for the quizzes or have fewer problems?
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu Apr 12, 2018 7:33 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Fundamental practice problem L.7 part b
Replies: 2
Views: 83

Fundamental practice problem L.7 part b

Hello, I am stuck on part b of practice problem L.7, please help: The camel stores the fat tristearin, C57H110O6, in its hump. As well as being a source of energy, the fat is also a source of water because, when it is used, the reaction 2C^57 H^110 O^6 (s) 163O^2 (g)->114 CO^2(g) +110 H^2O (l) takes...
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Tue Apr 10, 2018 6:55 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: What is the mass of AgCl produced?
Replies: 10
Views: 1851

Re: What is the mass of AgCl produced?

I think you have to triple the .004 because of the 3 in front of AgNO3.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Mon Apr 09, 2018 8:29 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: question on fundamentals G
Replies: 5
Views: 284

Re: question on fundamentals G

Hello, with help this is what we came up with:
Find the molarity of Na2CO3=0.08 M
convert mmol of Na+ to moles and convert mmol of CO3^2- and convert mmol of Na2CO3 to moles
mol of Na+/2(0.08M)
mol of CO3^2-/(0.8M)
mol of Na2C03/(0.8M)
convert answers to ML
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Mon Apr 09, 2018 7:57 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: L.3
Replies: 1
Views: 68

Re: L.3

HI, that is how you calculate it to grams, but part a asks to calculate to moles. Part b says to calculate to grams.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu Apr 05, 2018 2:36 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Questions F11
Replies: 4
Views: 174

Re: Questions F11

Hi, you are on the right track you just rounded the molar mass of Oxygen (15.999 to 16.00) IF you calculate 55.6g/15.999gmol=3.475 mols.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Thu Apr 05, 2018 9:13 am
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Module 3: Limiting Reactant Calculations, Question 26 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 159

Re: Module 3: Limiting Reactant Calculations, Question 26 [ENDORSED]

Hi, for this question you multiply 0.20 moles and 81g/mol to get 16.2grams. You don't multiply by 100 because it's asking for theoretical yield, not percent yield. Hope this is one of the answers.
by Jocelyn Fermin1J
Wed Apr 04, 2018 11:49 am
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Module 3: Limiting Reactant Calculations, Question 19
Replies: 4
Views: 175

Re: Module 3: Limiting Reactant Calculations, Question 19

Hi, I believe you have to balance the equation to continue your calculations.I also use the same logic to find the limiting reagent.

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