Search found 27 matches

by Chris Fults 1C
Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:48 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Determining Acid Strength
Replies: 6
Views: 346

Re: Determining Acid Strength

The bond strength of an acid generally depends on the size of the 'A' atom: the smaller the 'A' atom, the stronger the H-A bond. HF has the strongest bond and is the weakest acid. The strong bond between the more similarly-sized HF atoms doesn't want to break and allow the H to transfer. In contrast...
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:39 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted vs Lewis Acids and Bases
Replies: 5
Views: 384

Re: Bronsted vs Lewis Acids and Bases

Bronsted defines an acid as a proton donor whereas Lewis defines an acid as an electron pair acceptor. Conversely to the Bronsted theory, a base is a proton acceptor and in Lewis theory, a base is an electron pair donor. Therefore, some molecules, which don’t possess protons, can be acids according ...
by Chris Fults 1C
Sat Jun 09, 2018 2:31 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Final Layout
Replies: 2
Views: 153

Final Layout

Does anyone know what the layout of the final is going to be? Like how much of it is going to be material after the midterm? Also, what we have to know about acids/bases and coordination compounds?
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:27 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelating Ligands
Replies: 2
Views: 102

Re: Chelating Ligands

Chelating ligands can have several points of attachment. Ethylenediamine (NH2 CH2 CH2 NH2), can bond to a metal ion through each of the two nitrogens. Acetylacetone (CH3 COCH2 COCH3) is another example.
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Seesaw Shape
Replies: 4
Views: 159

Re: Seesaw Shape

The image did not come out right the lone electrons were above the C as well as the two Xs.
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:20 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Seesaw Shape
Replies: 4
Views: 159

Re: Seesaw Shape

I am a bit confused about this question. I have always assumed that the lone electron pair was above the central atom and that one element was on the right, one element was on the left, and two elements were on the bottom of the central atom. What I pictured below. This would give it the seesaw shap...
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:10 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Electron Promotion
Replies: 2
Views: 160

Re: Electron Promotion

Electron promotion is when an electron absorbs a photon to jump from a low energy level orbital to a higher energy orbital, hence “promotion.” This can only happen if the photon energy matches the energy difference of the orbitals. Hybridization is the concept of mixing atomic orbitals (s and p) int...
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun May 27, 2018 10:37 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: PF3 molecular geometry
Replies: 2
Views: 374

PF3 molecular geometry

When drawing the Lewis structure of PF3 would there be one lone pair or a double bond? Also, do double or triple bonds matter in VSEPR?
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun May 27, 2018 10:32 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: structure SF4
Replies: 2
Views: 81

Re: structure SF4

It is because there is a lone pair around Sulfur. The electrons want to be the furthest away possible from each other which is why the lone pair is usually above the central atom with the four fluorides being less than 90-degrees from each other. The lone pair is not counted so equatorial the angle ...
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun May 27, 2018 10:24 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: dipole moments and polarization
Replies: 3
Views: 113

Re: dipole moments and polarization

Do you mean it is polar because the oxygen is pulling electrons giving it a slight negative charge and the two hydrogens have a slight positive charge? Why doesn't this apply to CH4 which is to my knowledge non-polar?
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun May 27, 2018 10:19 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: lone pairs
Replies: 5
Views: 182

Re: lone pairs

In bent molecular geometry, there is a middle element with two other elements at the bottom end making a 120-degree angle. The lone pairs are straight ahead of the middle electron. When there are more than one lone pairs the angle between the two elements decrease making it <109 degrees.
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun May 20, 2018 11:06 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Stable lewis structures
Replies: 2
Views: 128

Re: Stable lewis structures

Do you mean the way of double or triple bonds? For example in single bonded N-N there would be 6 lone pairs for each carbon which means the formal charge would be -2. If you were to triple bond nitrogen there would be 2 lone pairs and 3 shared electrons decreasing the formal charge to zero, therefor...
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun May 20, 2018 10:58 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Hydrogen bonds vs. dipole-dipole bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 99

Hydrogen bonds vs. dipole-dipole bonds

Hey guys I was wondering about the strength of the hydrogen bonds vs dipole-dipole bonds vs ion dipole bonds. Essentially which ones are stronger and harder to break.
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun May 20, 2018 10:52 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge Shortcut
Replies: 3
Views: 293

Re: Formal Charge Shortcut

Its just looking at the PTOE by seeing how many valence electrons the element has and then using # of valence electrons - number of electrons in the lewis structure. For example nitrogen has 5 valence electrons so if it had 7 electrons in the lewis structure the formal charge of nitrogen would be -2.
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun May 13, 2018 3:52 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structure for NO3-
Replies: 3
Views: 136

Re: Lewis Structure for NO3-

Sorry, I just realized that mistake. I am still confused though because N has 5 V.e and if there were two double bonds with Oxygen then its formal charge would be zero. The single bond electron would have a formal charge of -1. The two double bond oxygens would have a formal charge of zero. Wouldnt ...
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun May 13, 2018 3:18 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Valence Electrons by Group
Replies: 2
Views: 76

Valence Electrons by Group

If an element is in group 9 such as cobalt how many valence electrons does it have? Would we assume that group 10 elements such as nickel have 0 valence electrons as well?
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun May 13, 2018 3:15 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structure for NO3-
Replies: 3
Views: 136

Lewis Structure for NO3-

In class, we went over the Lewis structure of NO3- and there were only 1 double bond and two single bonds connecting N to O. Could there be two double bonds and one single bond? It would make more sense because N has 7 valence electrons so with two double bonds it would have a value of +2 and one Ox...
by Chris Fults 1C
Thu May 03, 2018 11:34 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Filling of Orbitals [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 118

Electron Filling of Orbitals [ENDORSED]

In 2.45 part b, they ask to name the element with the electron configuration of [Ar]3d^3,4s^2 which is Vanadium. My question is to why the 4s orbital was filled and put second even though it is lower in energy and is filled first. The same is for the electron configuration for Tellurium [Kr] 4d^10, ...
by Chris Fults 1C
Thu May 03, 2018 11:20 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configurations and Unpaired e- [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 154

Electron Configurations and Unpaired e- [ENDORSED]

Hello, I am confused on how to determine the number of unpaired electrons. For example, the electron configuration for Se is [Ar] 3d^10, 4s^2, 4p^4. Because there are 4 electrons in the p-orbital doesn't that mean that all 4 are unpaired as they first go in separate shells then fill in the boxes wit...
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun Apr 29, 2018 11:36 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: f orbitals
Replies: 3
Views: 102

Re: f orbitals

The Professor said not for chem 14a
by Chris Fults 1C
Mon Apr 23, 2018 10:11 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Rydberg Equation
Replies: 4
Views: 197

Rydberg Equation

Can someone explain the Rydberg equation that was states in class that differs from v=R (1/ni^2-1/nf^2)?
by Chris Fults 1C
Mon Apr 23, 2018 9:26 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Homework Question 1.11
Replies: 1
Views: 66

Homework Question 1.11

In the spectrum of atomic hydrogen, several lines are generally classified together as belonging to a series (for example, Balmer series, Lyman series, Paschen series), as shown in Figs. 1.10 and 2.1. What is common to the lines within a series that makes grouping them together logical? I am having ...
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:49 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: empirical vs molecular
Replies: 5
Views: 282

Re: empirical vs molecular

Empirical formulas give us the basic structure of the covalently bonded molecule within the molecule. The molecular formula gives us the actual number of elements in a molecule. The Empirical formula tells us the ratio of elements in a compound which is helpful in 1. Calculating the percentage compo...
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:43 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Zeros in Sig Figs
Replies: 3
Views: 260

Zeros in Sig Figs

I am a little confused on when zeros count as significant figures. I understand that in a number such as 9.00 there are three sig figs but if the number was 0.09 would 9 be the only sig fig? Also, how many sig figs would be in the number 0.0900?
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:34 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Practice Worksheet Week 1 Question 3 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 209

Re: Practice Worksheet Week 1 Question 3 [ENDORSED]

Did you count 2 nitrogens and 4 oxygens because the two at the bottom of the parenthesis means you multiply with whats inside of them? There would be 2 nitrogens and 4 oxygens. The mass of nitrogen would be 28 and the mass of oxygen would be 64. I did this and got Sr= 49%, O= 36%,and N=16%.
by Chris Fults 1C
Sun Apr 15, 2018 1:29 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: When photon energy is less than threshold energy
Replies: 2
Views: 102

Re: When photon energy is less than threshold energy

I would assume that most if not all of the energy dissipates as heat as well.
by Chris Fults 1C
Fri Apr 13, 2018 5:52 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Post module quiz #25
Replies: 6
Views: 156

Re: Post module quiz #25

Would it be A because c= the speed of light?

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