Search found 32 matches

by Paywand Baghal
Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:40 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Bond length
Replies: 5
Views: 282

Re: Bond length

Brynne Keyser 1B wrote:You can look at the number of electrons that are present in each molecule. If there are more lone pairs, they will repel each other and cause a longer bond to be formed.


So for F when more electrons are added, it makes the bond longer?
by Paywand Baghal
Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:39 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Isoelectronic elements and their characteristics
Replies: 2
Views: 246

Re: Isoelectronic elements and their characteristics

Two elements being isoelectronic just mean that they have the same number of electrons and the same electron configurations. They can still have different characteristics. For example, K+ and Cl- are isoelectronic with Argon, however, Cl- is larger than K+ because K+ has more protons so it'll pull ...
by Paywand Baghal
Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:23 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Lyman, Balmer, Paschen, Brackett. etc. series and Wavelength
Replies: 3
Views: 135

Re: Lyman, Balmer, Paschen, Brackett. etc. series and Wavelength

The most definite way to assign a light wave to either the lyman or balman series is to look at the energy level change. If the spectral line emitted is a result of the energy level dropping from n≥2 to n=1 then it is a part of the Lyman series If the spectral line emitted is a result of the energy...
by Paywand Baghal
Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:22 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: expanded octet
Replies: 12
Views: 532

Re: expanded octet

Alexander Hari 1L wrote:Elements in the 1st and 2nd period do not have access to the the d orbital which prevents them from having an expanded octet, therefore elements that are in the 3rd period and below have the potential to expand their octet.


What is the extent of an extended octet?
by Paywand Baghal
Sat Jun 09, 2018 4:51 pm
Forum: *Making Buffers & Calculating Buffer pH (Henderson-Hasselbalch Equation)
Topic: Aqueous solutions
Replies: 2
Views: 619

Re: Aqueous solutions

Brynne Keyser 1B wrote:Yes, I think that we will need to know how strong acids and strong bases disassociate in water. I do not believe that we will need to know how to do equations with weak acids and weak bases.

Hope this helps!


Do we need to know how weak acids and weak bases disassociate in water?
by Paywand Baghal
Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:46 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Solubility and Polarity
Replies: 3
Views: 237

Re: Solubility and Polarity

polarity does affect solubility in water, because like dissolves like. If the substance is polar it will dissolve well, and if it is nonpolar, the substance will not dissolve as well. I thought if it was non polar it does no dissolve at all, is that not true? Because isn't the polarity also used to...
by Paywand Baghal
Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:44 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wave and Particle
Replies: 10
Views: 383

Re: Wave and Particle

MariaJohn1D wrote:a single particle of light is called a photon whereas a stream of photons is light


Would you calculate one molecule the same as one photon, in terms of Avogadro's constant?
by Paywand Baghal
Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:41 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Reactant vs. Reagent [ENDORSED]
Replies: 23
Views: 9431

Re: Reactant vs. Reagent [ENDORSED]

MariaJohn1D wrote:They can be used interchangeably, but reagents are not usually solvents


are reactants usually solvents?
by Paywand Baghal
Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:39 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Number
Replies: 2
Views: 109

Re: Coordination Number

ZachMoore1C wrote:The coordination number is just equal to the number of bonds correct


yes, the coordination number is the amount of atoms bonded to the central metal atom.
by Paywand Baghal
Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:35 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Boron and the octet rule [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 318

Re: Boron and the octet rule [ENDORSED]

Yadira Flores 1G wrote:I think it's all the elements in group 13.



I think the only exceptions are Lithium, Boron, Beryllium, and Aluminum.
by Paywand Baghal
Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:33 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Protons are lewis acids?
Replies: 5
Views: 163

Re: Protons are lewis acids?

Kate Manganaro 1F wrote:Hello,
I like to think about it in terms of charges. If an acid is a proton, which is positively charged, it is an electron acceptor (electrons have a negative charge).
Hope this helps!


are acids always an electron acceptor or are there acids which are negatively charged?
by Paywand Baghal
Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:32 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Given PH first
Replies: 4
Views: 311

Re: Given PH first

OrAmar-1L wrote:The formula given in class was pH = -log[H3O+]


is it in terms of H30+ or H+?
by Paywand Baghal
Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:11 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Weak vs strong acids [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 364

Re: Weak vs strong acids [ENDORSED]

kellyz_1C wrote:There are 7 strong acids that we should know and all others can be considered weak acids.
strong acids: HCl, HI, HBr, H2SO4, HN03, HClO3, HCl04


what are we supposed to do with this information about strong acids? is there a specific type of problem that needs this concept of strong or weak acids?
by Paywand Baghal
Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:08 pm
Forum: Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent Character
Replies: 4
Views: 537

Re: Covalent Character

You can think of covalent character as the opposite of ionic character. The greater the difference in electronegativity, the greater the ionic character. But smaller the difference, the more covalent character it has. can you describe the ionic character? or would it literally just be the exact opp...
by Paywand Baghal
Tue May 08, 2018 10:39 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic Bond formation
Replies: 5
Views: 186

Re: Ionic Bond formation

SammiOrsini_1B wrote:if the energy required is 494 would we be expected to find this number or is the number given? I have no idea how to find that number


it should be given, but I believe we just need to know the topic and be able to use any information given, not to memorize.
by Paywand Baghal
Tue May 08, 2018 10:33 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Electron Configuration
Replies: 6
Views: 249

Re: Electron Configuration

KateCaldwell 1A wrote:These numbers are determined by the l quantum number. The l number is the amount of orbitals an element can carry.



how do you figure out the l quantum number
by Paywand Baghal
Tue May 08, 2018 10:31 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Octet
Replies: 3
Views: 150

Octet

Why are H, He, Li, and Be exceptions to the octet rule?
by Paywand Baghal
Tue May 08, 2018 10:27 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Order of Dots
Replies: 11
Views: 406

Re: Order of Dots

I don't think that you have to fill the valence electrons in a specific order, all you need to do is make sure you're filling them in symmetrically. For example, if you had a molecule that had the following structure ( E - H - E ), and you had 8 valence electrons to fill, you would do have to fill ...
by Paywand Baghal
Tue May 08, 2018 10:26 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Resonance [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 231

Re: Resonance [ENDORSED]

Resonance is the blending of all the possible structures a molecule could have, correct?
by Paywand Baghal
Tue May 08, 2018 10:23 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Memorization of Electronegativity
Replies: 6
Views: 309

Re: Memorization of Electronegativity

does electronegativity decrease as we go left on the periodic table?
by Paywand Baghal
Sun May 06, 2018 1:37 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Octet
Replies: 7
Views: 318

Re: Octet

An Octet means 8 valence electrons ==> Oct = 8, like Octopus with 8 tentacles. An atom, in order to be more stable, can have up to eight electrons in its valence shell. Noble gases (Neon, Argon, etc) have full shells of eight valence electrons each. This complete configuration allows stable gases t...
by Paywand Baghal
Wed May 02, 2018 9:15 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Periodic Table Trends on the Midterm
Replies: 4
Views: 198

Re: Periodic Table Trends on the Midterm

I think we just need to have a grasp on the material, and the trends may be given if necessary for a question. I don't think we need to memorize anything too important, just need to understand how to apply the trends.
by Paywand Baghal
Wed May 02, 2018 7:47 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: s, p, d, f
Replies: 16
Views: 386

Re: s, p, d, f

Taizha 1C wrote:What type of midterm questions/practice problems are possible for s, p, d, f?


there was a homework problem where it asked us to draw it out, so we might be asked to differentiate the different orbitals (s, p, d, f)
by Paywand Baghal
Wed May 02, 2018 5:49 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Removing the 2nd electron is always harder [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 142

Re: Removing the 2nd electron is always harder [ENDORSED]

Yes! and also, maybe i heard him wrong, but he said something about the table with the ionization energies, which would be helpful because then you can use it to calculate the first then the second, etc., energies which then proves that the second is one higher, meaning it is harder to remove.
by Paywand Baghal
Wed May 02, 2018 5:38 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Test #2: Q5 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 9
Views: 499

Re: Test #2: Q5 [ENDORSED]

I was confused with this question as well. It asks for the wavelength of a sodium ion, does the mean we have to use Avogadro's number to convert from grams to moles or can we solve for the problem by just leaving it as grams. Yes so the way you would go about this is to find the mass of one sodium ...
by Paywand Baghal
Wed May 02, 2018 5:32 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Test #2: Q6 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 10
Views: 540

Re: Test #2: Q6 [ENDORSED]

I also used wavelength=hc/E, but the way you do it works too. With rounding the answer is 10 x 10^7 (positive exponent of 7, not negative, because there's 10^9 nanometers in one meter) If you don't mind explaining more, just so I can possibly understand, why would 10^9 nanometers in one meter make ...
by Paywand Baghal
Wed Apr 11, 2018 2:23 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Accuracy vs Precision
Replies: 23
Views: 769

Re: Accuracy vs Precision

Accuracy is on target. Precision is how closely you can repeatedly measure a thing. What is the chemistry context in which these differences will be most important? In context of chem, accuracy would be consistency getting the same, or around the same, answer when doing an experiment. Precision wou...
by Paywand Baghal
Wed Apr 11, 2018 2:20 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Post Assessment Question
Replies: 2
Views: 124

Re: Post Assessment Question

I still did the MiVi=MfVf for this problem. But before you can do that you need to turn the given grams into MOLARITY. Which you can do by first turning the grams(55.1gKCl) into moles. You should get 0.739 mol KCl. Then you divide the moles by the initial Volume given (0.075L). The value you get sh...
by Paywand Baghal
Wed Apr 11, 2018 2:13 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Limiting Reactant
Replies: 9
Views: 446

Re: Limiting Reactant

Once you calculate the moles of each reactant you have, given that the problem gave you two masses to begin with, you compare the ratios of those moles to the molar ratio provided by a balanced chemical equation. (The molar ratio is given by the stoichiometric coefficients). For example, if the rat...
by Paywand Baghal
Wed Apr 11, 2018 2:11 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Balancing equations with fractions [ENDORSED]
Replies: 13
Views: 491

Re: Balancing equations with fractions [ENDORSED]

All stoichiometric coefficients should be whole numbers and in order to cancel out the two, you can multiply the entire equation by 2. By doing this, you must multiply 2 to every single part of the equation and not just the coefficient fraction you are trying to make whole.
by Paywand Baghal
Wed Apr 11, 2018 2:04 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Molarity formula
Replies: 6
Views: 253

Re: Molarity formula

Say you're given two known variables and one unknown, for example you need to find the number of atoms and you have the Molarity and volume, you would use n=M/v. So that would be an example of where you can't use MiVi=MfVf
by Paywand Baghal
Wed Apr 11, 2018 2:02 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Avagrado's Number [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 335

Re: Avagrado's Number [ENDORSED]

It's usually for the number of molecules or atoms, depending on the question, but if you have something that asks for the number of molecules AND then the number of atoms, you can do the following. You would first use Avogadro's constant for the number of molecules, then you multiply that by the li...

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