Search found 27 matches

by Emily 1E
Sat Jun 09, 2018 10:14 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: E3
Replies: 2
Views: 156

E3

The question is "In a nanotechnology lab you might have the capability to manipulate individual atoms. The atoms on the left are gallium atoms (molar mass 70 g/mol), those on the right are atoms of astatine (molar mass 210 g/mol). How many astatine atoms would the pan on the right have to conta...
by Emily 1E
Wed Jun 06, 2018 5:51 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 4.43
Replies: 1
Views: 119

4.43

The question is: Noting that the bond angle of an sp3 hybridized atom is 109.5 and that of an sp2 hybridized atom is 120, do you expect the bond angle between two hybrid orbitals to increase or decrease as the s-character of the hybrids is increased? What exactly does this mean? What is the s-charac...
by Emily 1E
Mon Jun 04, 2018 10:33 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: J11c
Replies: 4
Views: 253

J11c

For the reaction 2HI + CaO -> CaI2 + H2O how do you know which is the acid and which is the base?
by Emily 1E
Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:51 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Final
Replies: 5
Views: 174

Re: Final

Toolbox 17.1 is also about naming coordination complexes, so I assume that's not needed as well
by Emily 1E
Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:46 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Chelate
Replies: 3
Views: 217

Re: Chelate

It's a central metal atom attached to ligands in a ring/cyclical structure. The ring structure can only be created with polydentate ligands, that can form coordinate bonds with more than one other atom/molecule. In most cases, the metal atom is bonded to a ligand, which is bonded to another ligand w...
by Emily 1E
Thu May 31, 2018 7:58 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: 4.25d - Lone Pairs
Replies: 2
Views: 179

4.25d - Lone Pairs

Do lone pairs have an effect on overall polarity of a molecule? For example the answers say SF4 is polar, even though all the atoms around the central atom are the same and exhibit the same dipole moments that should cancel out. Is it because the lone pairs effects the shape of the structure and pus...
by Emily 1E
Sat May 26, 2018 11:56 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Regions of electron density
Replies: 7
Views: 214

Re: Regions of electron density

VSPER theory is only concerned with the regions of electron density around the central atom. Lone pairs on non central atoms don't count as regions of electron density
by Emily 1E
Sat May 26, 2018 11:50 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polar Vs. Nonpolar
Replies: 1
Views: 177

Re: Polar Vs. Nonpolar

CFCl3 does exist. I think it is slightly polar. In general, if a central atom has more than 3 atoms around it and the 3 atoms are not all the same, the dipole moments don't completely cancel. In this case, the electronegativity different in C-F is slightly large than that of C-Cl, so there is a resu...
by Emily 1E
Sat May 26, 2018 11:44 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Remembering Bond Angles
Replies: 4
Views: 165

Remembering Bond Angles

Will we have to memorize bond angles for the final? How much detail will we have to know about them?
by Emily 1E
Sun May 20, 2018 11:35 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Double bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 177

Re: Double bonds

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think that is an explicit rule, I think it just depends on which atoms are bonding to which, and how many electrons (both bonding and lone pair) you need to draw into the Lewis Structure. For example, oxygen tends to form double bonds in both large and small mole...
by Emily 1E
Sun May 20, 2018 12:24 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 3.59a
Replies: 2
Views: 70

3.59a

The question asks to draw the Lewis structure of ClO, which is a radical. How to you know whether the single lone electron goes on the Cl molecule or the O molecule?
by Emily 1E
Sun May 20, 2018 11:06 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 3.25
Replies: 2
Views: 95

Re: 3.25

Although in general they have 3+ charges, it also depends on which atom(s) they are bonding with. If an element, like Bi, is bound to a more electronegative element it will have a 3+ positive charge. However, if Bi was the more electronegative atom in a molecule it would likely gain electrons to bec...
by Emily 1E
Thu May 17, 2018 4:09 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 3.25 e
Replies: 1
Views: 62

3.25 e

This question may have an obvious answer, but why does Bismuth have a 3+ charge as opposed to a 3- charge? Arsenic is in the same group as bismuth and has a 3- charge, yet bismuth can bond with 3 F- to create a neutrally charge molecule (BiFe3).
by Emily 1E
Sat May 12, 2018 4:24 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Nonpolar covalent bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 98

Re: Nonpolar covalent bonds

Non-polar covalent bonds are when a bond is formed when electrons are equally shared between two atoms (usually nonmetals belongs to p-block in the periodic table). The difference in electronegativity (tendency to accept bond pair of electrons towards itself) is negligible. So there no separation of...
by Emily 1E
Sat May 12, 2018 4:17 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: radicals [ENDORSED]
Replies: 9
Views: 250

Re: radicals [ENDORSED]

A radicals is a atom/molecule with a single unpaired valence electron. They contain an orbital valence orbital that only has one electron, not two. Radicals are highly reactive.
by Emily 1E
Sat May 12, 2018 4:11 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Why can't hydrogen be a central atom? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 296

Re: Why can't hydrogen be a central atom? [ENDORSED]

Hydrogen generally can only formed one covalent bond, because of its single valence electron. Therefore, in molecules made up of 3 or more atoms, it would never be in the center because it can only bond with one other atom, as it can only share its singular electron in a covalent bond.
by Emily 1E
Wed May 09, 2018 8:27 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Energy vs Intensity
Replies: 4
Views: 158

Energy vs Intensity

What's the difference between the energy and the intensity of photons/light?
by Emily 1E
Sun May 06, 2018 6:26 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Half filled exception
Replies: 3
Views: 239

Re: Half filled exception

Chromium is an example of the half filled exception. Instead of being Cr = [Ar] 4s^2 3d^4 as expected following the usual rules, it is 4s^1 3d^5. Because the 3d sub shell is more energetically stable if it has one electron in each of its 5 orbitals, that if it were to have only 4.
by Emily 1E
Sun May 06, 2018 6:12 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Question 2.41
Replies: 3
Views: 91

Re: Question 2.41

B is also false because if the value of l is 0, then the value of ml must be 0 as well
by Emily 1E
Sun May 06, 2018 4:52 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: 2.37
Replies: 3
Views: 164

2.37

Part b) of this question where you have to determine whether the statements are true or false is: Electrons in an s-orbital are more effective than those in other orbitals at shielding other electrons from the nuclear charge because an electron in an s-orbital can penetrate to the nucleus of the ato...
by Emily 1E
Mon Apr 30, 2018 1:12 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: 2.29
Replies: 9
Views: 348

2.29

How many electrons can have the following quantum numbers in an atom: (c) n = 2?
The answer says 8 electrons, but wouldn't n = 2 be a p orbital, which has 6 electrons? Where do the other 2 electrons come from?
by Emily 1E
Sat Apr 28, 2018 12:09 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric effect post-quiz 17-19 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 2938

Re: Photoelectric effect post-quiz 17-19 [ENDORSED]

Incident light means the same thing as the photon used to eject the electron in this context, and E = hv is used to convert the energy of the incident light to the frequncy
by Emily 1E
Sat Apr 28, 2018 11:59 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: What is work function? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 15
Views: 1048

Re: What is work function? [ENDORSED]

It is given by the equation energy supplied by a photon - kinetic energy of the ejected electron, or hv - (1/2)mv^2
by Emily 1E
Sat Apr 28, 2018 11:49 am
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: 1.43 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 88

1.43 [ENDORSED]

"What is the minimum uncertainty in the speed of an electron confined to within a lead atom of diameter 350. pm? Model the atom as a one-dimensional box with a length equal to the diameter of the actual atom." What does the second part of the question mean? What's the significance of havin...
by Emily 1E
Thu Apr 19, 2018 7:52 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Homework Problem 1.5
Replies: 2
Views: 105

Re: Homework Problem 1.5

Energy = (planck's constant x speed of light)/wavelength
So the larger the wavelength, the greater the denominator and the lower the energy.
by Emily 1E
Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:16 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Question 1.11
Replies: 2
Views: 101

Question 1.11

In the spectrum of atomic hydrogen, several lines are generally classified together as belonging to a series (for example, Balmer series, Lyman series, Paschen series), as shown in Figs. 1.10 and 2.1. What is common to the lines within a series that makes grouping them together logical? The answers ...
by Emily 1E
Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:15 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: HW 1.3 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 12
Views: 436

Re: HW 1.3 [ENDORSED]

Also, what does the electric field in this context refer to?

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