Search found 29 matches

by John Miller-1I
Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:02 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Oxidation number
Replies: 1
Views: 161

Re: Oxidation number

I was about to ask the same question for clarification, but so far it seems like we have been given the oxidation numbers so I am assuming that we do not need to memorize them although I could be wrong.
by John Miller-1I
Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:21 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Strength of Acid and Bases
Replies: 3
Views: 203

Re: Strength of Acid and Bases

I agree that without more context besides "less acidic" I would assume that it is talking about a comparison between solutions with the less acidic one having a lower concentration of H30+
by John Miller-1I
Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:16 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: HW 4.19
Replies: 3
Views: 241

Re: HW 4.19

Since there are more than one "central" atoms in this molecule, the shape around one of these atoms can be determined the same way as if it were just a single compound with one central atom
by John Miller-1I
Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:09 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: BeCl2 formal charge vs octet rule
Replies: 2
Views: 249

Re: BeCl2 formal charge vs octet rule

Generally formal charge is the more important aspect to look at, as long as you know the general octet rules and the exceptions and you are not breaking them blatantly, formal charge is more useful to look at.
by John Miller-1I
Wed Jun 13, 2018 2:38 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Homework 4.13
Replies: 2
Views: 161

Re: Homework 4.13

is is a little bit confusing, but essentially there are 5 regions of electron density with the lone pairs having the most repulsion from each other. This means those three regions will make the trigonal planar aspect of a trigonal bipyramidal geometry, and the the Iodine forming a linear shape.
by John Miller-1I
Wed Jun 13, 2018 2:25 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Worksheet 9 #1
Replies: 1
Views: 141

Re: Worksheet 9 #1

For me, the easiest way of calculating formal charge is [total #of valence electrons on atom]-([# of bonds atom forms] + [# unbound atoms]) By this formula, both the Nitrogen and Oxygen would have a formal charge of 0 in the Lewis structure dawn on worksheet 9, because nitrogen has 5 valence electro...
by John Miller-1I
Wed Jun 13, 2018 2:19 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: ClO2+ Chapter 4 Homework Problem 5
Replies: 1
Views: 155

Re: ClO2+ Chapter 4 Homework Problem 5

You are right, CLO2+ has a bent shape with a OCLO bond angle of <120 degrees. The answer in the book says the molecule has an "angular" shape which is another word for bent. There's no mention of trigonal bipyramidal that I can see, do you mind explaining where you saw that? The molecular ...
by John Miller-1I
Tue Jun 12, 2018 3:53 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Ka
Replies: 5
Views: 275

Re: Ka

It is a constant that measures how strongly the acid dissociates, meaning how easily it donates a proton.
by John Miller-1I
Tue Jun 12, 2018 3:41 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angle [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 265

Re: Bond Angle [ENDORSED]

The absolute exact bond angle is not necessary to know because they are different for every molecule, knowing the general angles (like either 109.5 or <109.5) is good enough because exact angles require experimental data.
by John Miller-1I
Tue Jun 12, 2018 3:38 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Name of Molecule
Replies: 4
Views: 193

Re: Name of Molecule

Lone pairs affect shape even more than bonds (as seen by their ability to reduce bond angles like turning a bond angle of 120 degrees to <120) so they cannot be ignored
by John Miller-1I
Tue Jun 12, 2018 3:36 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Sigma and Pi bonds on the final
Replies: 1
Views: 140

Sigma and Pi bonds on the final

Does anyone have an example of a book problem relating to sigma and pi bonds that could be on the final? I cannot remember much discussion on them from class
by John Miller-1I
Tue Jun 12, 2018 3:32 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Final Topics Question [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 150

Final Topics Question [ENDORSED]

Does anyone know what kinds of questions on coordination compounds will actually be on the final? I remember Dr Lavelle saying we don't need to know how to name them or draw the more complicated ones, but are there examples of questions that are fair game?
by John Miller-1I
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:53 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Radicals
Replies: 13
Views: 634

Re: Radicals

The easiest way to determine a radical is just to count the number of electrons and if it is an odd number the structure is radical
by John Miller-1I
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:52 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: ranking
Replies: 11
Views: 494

Re: ranking

There can be many different resonance structures, but the ones with the lowest formal charge contribute the most to the resonance
by John Miller-1I
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:49 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 6.11
Replies: 2
Views: 136

Re: 6.11

For hydrogen bonding to occur there must be unequal sharing of electrons between hydrogen and another atom in the molecule to cause partial positive and negative charges
by John Miller-1I
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:47 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Help on 3.25 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 173

Re: Help on 3.25 [ENDORSED]

I agree that the best way to start is by looking at the roman numerals for charge
by John Miller-1I
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:45 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: HW 6.1
Replies: 3
Views: 187

Re: HW 6.1

All of the electrons are being shared equally so there is no polarity
by John Miller-1I
Fri May 25, 2018 9:24 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 3.51
Replies: 2
Views: 96

Re: 3.51

I think part of the reasoning for asking this question is to realize why oxygen should be in the middle of this atom in the first place, because it does produce an atom configuration with the lowest formal charge. Even though we may have already known to put oxygen in the middle, this makes us reali...
by John Miller-1I
Fri May 25, 2018 9:15 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 3.45
Replies: 3
Views: 152

Re: 3.45

One subject that is mentioned in the book is that although there can be many, many resonance structures for a particular atom, the ones that have the lowest formal charge contribute the most to the actual resonance of the atom
by John Miller-1I
Fri May 25, 2018 9:11 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: bond length and charge
Replies: 3
Views: 287

Re: bond length and charge

It depends on how you are looking at charge, but the larger the molecules the longer the bond length (which makes sense because there are more electrons orbiting the element)
by John Miller-1I
Fri May 25, 2018 9:10 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity Caluclations
Replies: 4
Views: 259

Re: Electronegativity Caluclations

They also have periodic tables with electronegativity listed which allows you to see patterns between elements, but yes it will be given
by John Miller-1I
Fri May 25, 2018 9:05 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polar & Nonpolar
Replies: 3
Views: 136

Re: Polar & Nonpolar

To elaborate on the above on how to determine which element will be more positive/negative, you can look at a periodic table with electronegativity listed. The element that is more electronegative will attract electrons the most and therefore be partially negative in a polar bond
by John Miller-1I
Mon May 21, 2018 11:19 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity vs. Electron affinity
Replies: 7
Views: 292

Re: Electronegativity vs. Electron affinity

To clarify, this means that electronegativity and electron affinity are expressing the same idea, or a similar idea, but electronegativity is a relative scale whereas electron affinity is quantitative? I believe this is correct, in a practical sense they can be thought of as the same way as they bo...
by John Miller-1I
Sun Apr 29, 2018 10:42 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: understanding orbitals [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 232

Re: understanding orbitals [ENDORSED]

I think that each plane shows the path with the highest probability of (specifically) the two electrons in that particular orbital. Does this mean that electrons are confined to one orbital and cannot move between, for example, px, py, pz? Based on what we have gone over in lecture, it sounds as if...
by John Miller-1I
Sun Apr 29, 2018 10:39 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: orbitals/lobes
Replies: 3
Views: 153

Re: orbitals/lobes

I agree that it seems like we should be able to recognize and understand the basics of drawing orbitals, but only in as much detail as we went over in class
by John Miller-1I
Sun Apr 29, 2018 10:35 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: The concept of Orbitals
Replies: 12
Views: 306

Re: The concept of Orbitals

Orbitals are a state around the atom where electrons have the highest probability of being found, but they are dynamic and changing.
by John Miller-1I
Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:35 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: History of experiments on the model of atom
Replies: 7
Views: 334

Re: History of experiments on the model of atom

Nothing on the syllabus indicates that this is material needed for the course
by John Miller-1I
Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:34 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Geiger -Marsden experiment [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 202

Re: Geiger -Marsden experiment [ENDORSED]

Aryana Nazem 1A wrote:will we have to know all the early scientists who propsed differenttheories for the composition of an atom??

As far as it seems on the syllabus these scientists are not required material for the course
by John Miller-1I
Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:13 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wavelength [ENDORSED]
Replies: 9
Views: 327

Re: Wavelength [ENDORSED]

A measure of wavelength is only one complete wave, whether that be from peak to peak (which is often easiest to identify) or any other two points that encompass exactly one complete wave.

Go to advanced search