Search found 30 matches

by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:57 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone pairs
Replies: 5
Views: 159

Re: Lone pairs

I'm not sure about the first part of your question, but lone pairs will repel other lone pairs and bonded electrons so the angle would decrease compared to if there were no lone pairs affecting the bonding angles.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:55 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybrid orbitals
Replies: 6
Views: 213

Re: Hybrid orbitals

Regions of electron density are the amount of bonds (single, double, and triple all count as one) or lone pairs a central atom has. So if there are 5 regions of electron density for example, it would be sp3d.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:52 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Question 4.25 Part A
Replies: 2
Views: 78

Question 4.25 Part A

For part A we were suppose to write the lewis structure of CCl2H2 and determine if it was nonpolar or polar. Based on the structure, it would make sense that it's polar since both Cls are next to each other and pulling on the electrons of C. But how are we suppose to know the structure of the molecu...
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 28, 2018 5:54 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: E
Replies: 3
Views: 112

Re: E

It would be E subscript 3. So assuming there is one bonding pair (X) the formula would be AXE(subscript 3).
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 28, 2018 5:52 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR confusion
Replies: 8
Views: 250

Re: VSEPR confusion

A lewis structure just shows us how many valence electrons there are and what kind of bonds are used whereas the VSEPR model gives the actual shape of the valence electrons in a molecule. The shape is determined by the repulsion of the electrons which can create various shapes such as linear, tetrah...
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 28, 2018 5:48 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: shapes
Replies: 3
Views: 128

Re: shapes

We learned about linear, trigonal planar, tetrahedral, trigonal bipyramidal, octahedral, square planar, and seesaw.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 21, 2018 1:40 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: lone pairs
Replies: 3
Views: 112

Re: lone pairs

Shared electrons between atoms will have dipole moments, not lone pairs.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 21, 2018 1:39 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octet Rules
Replies: 4
Views: 225

Re: Octet Rules

I believe hydrogen, helium, lithium, beryllium, boron, and aluminum follow the same exception to the octet rule. Correct me if I am wrong though please.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 21, 2018 1:35 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativiry vs electron affinity [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 263

Re: Electronegativiry vs electron affinity [ENDORSED]

The trends of electronegativity and electron affinity are the same. They increase to the right and increase when going up the periodic table. Electronegativity measures how strongly an atom of an element attracts bonding electrons and electron affinity is the amount of energy released when an electr...
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 14, 2018 12:23 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: HW problem 3.21
Replies: 4
Views: 169

Re: HW problem 3.21

The ground state configuration of AG is [Kr] 4d^10 5s^1 because of the half shell rule. Since the question is asking for the configuration of AG+, you would take away an electron leaving just [Kr] 4d^10.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 14, 2018 12:17 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic Bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 139

Re: Ionic Bonds

Typically atoms will either gain or lose an electron until it form a noble gas configuration. It depends on which is easier to do for the element. Metals will more likely lose electrons and nonmetals will gain electrons.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 14, 2018 12:15 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: VALENCE ELECTRONS [ENDORSED]
Replies: 16
Views: 444

Re: VALENCE ELECTRONS [ENDORSED]

You look at the group numbers or the rows of each element. However, I skip the d-block so where Boron is at would be group 3. For hydrogen, since it is in group 1, it has one valence electron. For another element like carbon, since it is group 4, it would have 4 valence electrons.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 07, 2018 1:45 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Special Cases [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 132

Re: Special Cases [ENDORSED]

You just have to remember that the elements in d4 and d9 fall under the exceptions. It's because it's better to have all the orbitals half full than one full and one not have any at all.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 07, 2018 1:42 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: 3d before 4s
Replies: 9
Views: 261

Re: 3d before 4s

When there are no electrons, 4s is lower in energy than 3d, but once 4s is filled, 3d becomes lower in energy. At least that is what I think happens, please correct me if I'm wrong!
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon May 07, 2018 1:40 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: homework 2.43 part e [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 312

Re: homework 2.43 part e [ENDORSED]

I'm also slightly confused with this problem. Why does 4f^14 come before 5d^4 and 6s^2?
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 30, 2018 5:26 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Explanation to the answer of the question 2.31
Replies: 4
Views: 124

Re: Explanation to the answer of the question 2.31

6f would consist of the lanthanoids and 4d would be the row where yttrium starts and cadmium ends (when n = 5).
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 30, 2018 5:22 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: orbitals
Replies: 3
Views: 101

Re: orbitals

Since Argon is a noble gas, the outer shell is filled and you can just start from the next row to get to bromine. So after you write Argon, you would start from the 4th row, but remember to use 3d before 4s. In this case, it would be 3d^10, 4s^2, and 4p^5 for bromine.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 30, 2018 5:10 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Energy, subshells, shells???
Replies: 1
Views: 82

Energy, subshells, shells???

Hello can someone explain to me all the different terms and how they relate to each other? The math portion I understand, such as how to find l when you're given n, but the concepts itself confuse me. I know that n = size/shape and l corresponds to the orbitals, but I'm not sure exactly what they ar...
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 23, 2018 12:15 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: amplitude and intensity
Replies: 11
Views: 316

Re: amplitude and intensity

Yes I believe we will be tested on that and everything else up until De Broglie's equation.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 23, 2018 12:12 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Homework Problem(s) [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 195

Homework Problem(s) [ENDORSED]

I was having trouble with a few problems from Chapter 1 (such as 1.41. and 1.37). Both involved using the mass of either a proton, neutron, or both. Are we suppose to already know the mass of a proton or a neutron? (It wasn't given in the question.)
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 23, 2018 12:08 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Memorizing formulas test 2
Replies: 16
Views: 539

Re: Memorizing formulas test 2

Equations will be given to us for the tests/exams, but practicing problems is a good way to help you memorize how to use each formula!
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:33 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Homework? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 10
Views: 340

Re: Homework? [ENDORSED]

Homework usually depends on the day of your discussion, but as of right now you can do homework from Outline 1 or Outline 2 or both. Basically whatever Dr. Lavelle has taught us so far can be done for homework.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:25 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: HW 1.7 (using nm vs pm)
Replies: 8
Views: 253

Re: HW 1.7 (using nm vs pm)

The problem itself says to use nm for part A and pm for part B. If the problem didn't tell you what units to use, you should probably use the units you were working with to solve the problem.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:20 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1.13 (b)
Replies: 6
Views: 195

Re: 1.13 (b)

Are you sure your answer was 4.86x10^-17 m? My answer was 4.86x10^-7 m and then I converted it to nanometers because the chart itself was in nanometers.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 09, 2018 11:34 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: What do the coefficients/subscripts represent [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 342

Re: What do the coefficients/subscripts represent [ENDORSED]

When there is a coefficient in front of a molecule, you would multiply that number by the number of atoms in each element. So for H20, there are 2 hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. However, since there is a coefficient of 4 in front of it, you would multiply it by each element and get 8 hydrogen a...
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 09, 2018 11:24 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Accuracy vs Precision
Replies: 23
Views: 705

Re: Accuracy vs Precision

Accuracy is how close your results are to the true value. Precision is how close your results are to each other.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Mon Apr 09, 2018 11:12 am
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Homework for Week 2
Replies: 2
Views: 106

Homework for Week 2

Is the homework for week 2 the same topics we worked on in week 1? (Balancing chemical reactions, limiting reactants, etc.)
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Fri Apr 06, 2018 5:28 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: How to know the state of the molecules [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 233

Re: How to know the state of the molecules [ENDORSED]

Usually the problems will give you the state of the molecules, but is not needed to actually solve the problem. (g) = gas, (s) = solid, (l) = liquid, and (aq) = aqueous
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Fri Apr 06, 2018 5:25 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: H.5.b [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 250

Re: H.5.b [ENDORSED]

When there's a subscript following the parenthesis, you multiply that number by the number in the parenthesis. So yes Mg(N3)2 would be Mg(N6) and you ignore the MG since the subscript doesn't apply to that element. So since you have 6N on the left side, you try to get 6N on the right side as well.
by Haison Nguyen 1I
Fri Apr 06, 2018 5:19 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Module 3: Limiting Reactant Calculations, Question 26 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 178

Re: Module 3: Limiting Reactant Calculations, Question 26 [ENDORSED]

Hello, you don't divide 0.20 mol by 81 g/mol because that does not lead to the theoretical yield. Instead of dividing, you would multiply 0.20 mols by 81 g/mol because that gives you the amount of grams in 0.20 mols (16.2 g). This should be the theoretical yield.

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