Search found 30 matches

by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri Jun 08, 2018 9:51 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: molecular shape-seesaw
Replies: 2
Views: 127

Re: molecular shape-seesaw

For molecules like sulfur tetrachloride the reason why its shape is seesaw is primarily because the electrons want to be as far from each other as possible. If not it would look like a trigonal bypyrimidial but the lone pair would rather be at 120 degrees than 90.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri Jun 08, 2018 9:47 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Pi bonds in triple bond
Replies: 17
Views: 440

Re: Pi bonds in triple bond

A single bond is a sigma bond.
A double bond is a sigma bond plus one pi bond.
A triple bond is a sigma bond plus two pi bonds.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri Jun 08, 2018 9:20 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chapter4 Question7C
Replies: 1
Views: 101

Chapter4 Question7C

This question is referring to SOCl2.
I understand the Lewis Structure and the shape which is trigonal pyramidal.
But what I do not understand how the bond angle for OSCl is 107 and for ClSCl is 97. How do I come to get these numbers?
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri Jun 08, 2018 9:17 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted vs Lewis acids
Replies: 3
Views: 320

Re: Bronsted vs Lewis acids

lEwis Acids are Electron Acceptors. lewis bases are electron donors. brOnsted aciDs are prOton Donors. bronsted bases are proton acceptors. An easy way to memorize it is to look at the capitalized letters and correlate them with each other. It is interesting because in a process like H+ becoming H, ...
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri Jun 08, 2018 9:12 am
Forum: Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent Character
Replies: 4
Views: 542

Re: Covalent Character

You can think of covalent character as the opposite of ionic character. The greater the difference in electronegativity, the greater the ionic character. But smaller the difference, the more covalent character it has.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri Jun 08, 2018 9:10 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Perchlorate (ClO4)-
Replies: 7
Views: 2275

Perchlorate (ClO4)-

So this came up in my test and I'm still having a hard time understanding. When I drew the Lewis Structure, I put the one negative formal charge on the chlorine, thinking that it would be better than putting it on oxygen that makes things less symmetric. However, I got it wrong and the answer said t...
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Wed May 23, 2018 5:54 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Ionic character
Replies: 3
Views: 295

Re: Ionic character

Ionic character is the difference in electronegativity. The greater the difference, larger the ionic character is and conversely smaller the difference larger the covalent character is. So for example if we are comparing CO2 and CS2 carbon's electronegativity is 2.5, oxygen is 3, and sulfur is appro...
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Wed May 23, 2018 12:39 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Finding the central element on the Lewis structure
Replies: 4
Views: 256

Re: Finding the central element on the Lewis structure

Usually you can follow the rule on F O N Cl (Br I). Electronegativity increases from right to left, meaning that it is less likely to be in the center of the Lewis structure. If the molecule they asked for was ONF, because out of the three elements N is the least electronegative, it would be in the ...
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Wed May 23, 2018 12:36 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Ionic Compounds
Replies: 2
Views: 120

Ionic Compounds

I was working on homework 3.39 and they ask for the Lewis Structure of a compound. However in the solutions, it seems like from the given information I am supposed to know that the compounds are ionic compounds and therefore they use brackets and charges. Is there a way to automatically know that su...
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri May 18, 2018 12:37 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Connection
Replies: 3
Views: 213

Re: Connection

In addition to the response above, all bonds between atoms that are not the same element will have a certain amount of polarity because they aren't the same. This is due to the varying power of an atom that pulls its electrons (electronegativity).
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri May 18, 2018 12:21 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Question 3.25
Replies: 2
Views: 90

Re: Question 3.25

I'm not sure if this way is quicker but Mg would most likely have a charge of 2+ and As would have a charge of 3- because they want to fill up their shells. The sum of the charges is -1 and in order to make it 0 you can multiple Mg2+ by 3 and As3- by 2. Then the formula would become Mg3As2.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri May 18, 2018 12:16 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Help on 3.23
Replies: 2
Views: 79

Re: Help on 3.23

So chlorine's electron configuration is [Ne] 3s^2 3p^5.
The element can only manage to gain one negative charge because there is space for just one electron on the 3p sub-shell. And alternatively it can lose up to 7 at which it will become fully filled up like a noble gas.
Hope this helps :)
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Sun May 13, 2018 11:24 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: octet explanation [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 107

Re: octet explanation [ENDORSED]

I think it is like a personification that states the fact that they will share in covalent bonds or gain and lose electrons in ionic bonds to complete their valence electrons. If they did not "go as far as possible" many would remain incomplete and unstable.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Sun May 13, 2018 11:21 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic Bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 160

Re: Ionic Bonds

In the textbook with the Na+ example, a sodium ion will lose its 3s electron to form Na+. It does not lose more because the ionization energies of core electrons are too high. And nonmetals will rarely lose their electrons but would rather gain them to fill their valence shells.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Sun May 13, 2018 11:18 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: resonance structures on exams
Replies: 5
Views: 212

Re: resonance structures on exams

I believe there was something like this mentioned in my discussion section, but even if there are many different structures, a certain form will be more favorable or stable with its distribution of electrons and bonds. However, like many people have said, they should be clear with what they are aski...
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Sun May 13, 2018 11:14 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: resonance
Replies: 6
Views: 209

Re: resonance

Formal charge is another factor of forming the structure that you would have to take account of to make sure that the bonds you are forming are actually possible! So even if you have many possible ways of forming the structure, you should take into consideration that the formal charges are correct.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Thu May 03, 2018 6:09 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: HOMEWORK PROBLEM 2.19
Replies: 3
Views: 140

Re: HOMEWORK PROBLEM 2.19

For part a, l would be 0~6 which makes it 7 numerical values in total. You know it is 0~6 because n=7 and l=0,...n-1.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Thu May 03, 2018 6:06 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: 2.25 hw
Replies: 2
Views: 96

Re: 2.25 hw

In order to know how many electrons there are you would have to know the value of l, and ml. For example in (a) it gives you 4p-orbitals. With "p" you know that l is 1 because 0,1,2,3 corresponds to s,p,d,f respectively. And ml is -1,0,1. There are three subshells because there are three m...
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Thu May 03, 2018 6:03 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: 2.19
Replies: 3
Views: 121

Re: 2.19

Given the n value, you can know how many subshells there are by looking at the l value.
simply put [l=0,...n-1]
To answer your question:
EX) How many subshells are there in the shell with n=4?
if n=5 then l=0,1,2,3,4 which would equal to 5 subshells
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri Apr 27, 2018 4:23 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wave and Particle
Replies: 10
Views: 387

Re: Wave and Particle

The photoelectric effect experiment showed that electromagnetic radiation consists of particle-like protons because when light collided with electrons in the metal, electrons were ejected with kinetic energy that is the difference between the energy of the photon and the work function.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri Apr 27, 2018 4:18 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: does everything have a wavelength
Replies: 10
Views: 376

Re: does everything have a wavelength

According to De Broglie, anything with mass has wavelike properties. So using his equation, lamda=h/p you can figure out the wavelength. It works for any particle with momentum (p) and it has wavelike properties with wavelength (lamda).
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Fri Apr 27, 2018 4:16 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Work Function
Replies: 4
Views: 186

Re: Work Function

Generally, it is useful to know that kinetic energy is equal to hv-(work function) so even though work function is not given it should be easy to use other given information to figure it out.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Wed Apr 18, 2018 9:27 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Midterm Question: wavelike properties
Replies: 6
Views: 298

Re: Midterm Question: wavelike properties

Simply put, you can use the De Brolie equation (h/mass*velocity) to find out if the wavelength has measurable properties. If the wavelength is less than 10^-18m it is not detectable/measurable because it is so small. And like everyone mentioned before, the examples he gave in class are helpful in un...
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Wed Apr 18, 2018 7:55 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: 10^-18
Replies: 3
Views: 117

10^-18

I understand from the lecture that if the wavelength is smaller than 10^-18, it does not have wavelike properties. However, did Professor Lavelle mention why this was so? Is there an equation or experiment that determines this value to be the cut-off?
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Sat Apr 14, 2018 9:57 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: wavelength description [ENDORSED]
Replies: 11
Views: 369

Re: wavelength description [ENDORSED]

In the textbook amplitude is defined as the height of the wave above the center line. So when you use the peak-to-peak distance you would count the highest point, or the amplitude.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Sat Apr 14, 2018 9:52 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Equations [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 196

Re: Equations [ENDORSED]

E=hv can be used when finding the energy of light of a frequency or finding the frequency of a given energy of light. h is Planck's constant so it will always be 6.63x10^-34J*s.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Sat Apr 14, 2018 9:47 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Quantized v. Discrete
Replies: 5
Views: 143

Quantized v. Discrete

In my notes I wrote "Equations in quantum mechanics have variables that are quantized or discrete." Could someone define quantized or discrete or give an example?
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Sat Apr 14, 2018 9:41 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Theoretical Yield [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 267

Re: Theoretical Yield [ENDORSED]

1. Find the amount in moles from the given mass.
2. Then with the mole ratio in the chemical equation, convert the amount of the amount in moles from step 1 to amount in moles of the other reactant.
3. Then convert the amount in moles from step 2 to mass.
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Sat Apr 14, 2018 9:37 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Balancing Equations With Rational Coefficients [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 129

Re: Balancing Equations With Rational Coefficients [ENDORSED]

Initially he used the fraction to balance out the equation mathematically, but later he mentioned that all stoichiometric coefficients must be whole number so he multiplied the whole thing by 2 and acquired whole numbers!
by Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Sat Apr 14, 2018 9:33 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: dilution
Replies: 4
Views: 240

Re: dilution

molarity(M) = moles of solute(n) / volume of solution(v)
MinitialVinitial = MfinalVfinal

These should help when figuring it out. And when diluting a solution the moles of solute should remain the same.

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