Search found 30 matches

by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Dec 09, 2018 3:49 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Size and Polarizability
Replies: 4
Views: 62

Re: Size and Polarizability

does left to right or up and down have a greater effect on radii?
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Dec 09, 2018 3:39 pm
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Acid Rain
Replies: 9
Views: 492

Re: Acid Rain

Is acid rain formed from SO2 or SO4?
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Dec 09, 2018 3:37 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: order of ligand name
Replies: 5
Views: 78

Re: order of ligand name

They just go in alphabetical order, disregarding the prefixes.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Dec 02, 2018 3:06 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Dissociation energy
Replies: 7
Views: 82

Re: Dissociation energy

Dissociation energy is the energy required to break a bond. When bonds are formed, energy is released bc the molecule becomes more stable. When bonds are broken, energy must be added (positive) as to bring the atoms to less stable states (higher energy levels).
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Dec 02, 2018 2:12 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Is Hydrogen Bonding a type of Dipole-Dipole Interaction?
Replies: 5
Views: 71

Re: Is Hydrogen Bonding a type of Dipole-Dipole Interaction?

If the final asks for the intermolecular forces in a molecule, can we always write that London forces are present or are there cases where they are not?
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Dec 02, 2018 1:59 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: lone pairs
Replies: 20
Views: 153

Re: lone pairs

Is the answer automatically wrong if lone pairs are not separated from the shared pairs of electrons? for instance, if something has 3 shared pairs of electrons and 2 lone pairs, can it only be written as AX3E2 or can you write it as AX5? The VSEPR formula calls to use A for the central atom, X for...
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 25, 2018 5:39 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Delta Bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 77

Re: Delta Bonds

What is an example of a compound that has a delta bond?
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 25, 2018 5:31 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Drawing resonance
Replies: 17
Views: 235

Re: Drawing resonance

It is important to draw the resonance for a molecule because it demonstrates that the actual bond lengths are the average of the bond lengths. Do we need to include something to show the bond lengths are an average and the same or is that implied when we draw the resonance structures? I don't think...
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 25, 2018 5:26 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Energy of Interactions
Replies: 4
Views: 41

Re: Energy of Interactions

Imelda Mena 3I wrote:Does anyone know if the different types of bonds will be on test 3? Thanks in advance!


I think so. The syllabus says that test 3 will cover section 3.12 in the end of bonding and all of Molecular Shape and Structure.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 18, 2018 11:17 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Drawing resonance
Replies: 17
Views: 235

Re: Drawing resonance

It is important to draw the resonance for a molecule because it demonstrates that the actual bond lengths are the average of the bond lengths.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 18, 2018 11:04 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polar vs. Nonpolar
Replies: 5
Views: 74

Re: Polar vs. Nonpolar

If dipole moments, caused by differences in electronegativity, do not cancel, then the molecule will be polar. The atom with the greater electronegativity will get the delta negative and the atom with the lower electronegativity will have the delta positive. Electronegativity follows the general tre...
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 18, 2018 6:10 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: molecular shapes
Replies: 13
Views: 135

Re: molecular shapes

I don't think Dr. Lavelle has mentioned the trigonal pyramidal shape, but it is the answer to question 4.7 in the 6th edition. It also says that the bond angles are 109.5 degrees (which is the same angle as a tetrahedral shape) so are these two shapes the same? The trigonal pyramidal I think is the...
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 11, 2018 8:43 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole
Replies: 8
Views: 119

Re: Dipole

Dipoles do not have much influence over Lewis structures, they are only important in VSEPR models.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 11, 2018 8:36 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Molar Mass
Replies: 8
Views: 287

Re: Molar Mass

To find the mass of a molecule however, you need to take the molar mass, found under the atomic symbol on the periodic table, and divide by Avogadro's number, 6.022X10^23.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 11, 2018 8:28 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Combustion Equation
Replies: 8
Views: 294

Re: Combustion Equation

The reaction for combustion will be compound + O2 --> CO2 + H2O
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:25 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Ms quantum number relevancy on the midterm
Replies: 4
Views: 66

Re: Ms quantum number relevancy on the midterm

This is also important in questions asking a question similar to: how many electrons can have quantum numbers n=4, l=1? Because each configuration of n,l,m can have 2 possible Ms values.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:13 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge and Lewis Structures
Replies: 5
Views: 51

Re: Formal Charge and Lewis Structures

The formal charges could be useful in determining the most favorable arrangement of atoms in a molecule, and therefore the most likely Lewis structure. The Lewis structure with formal charges closest to zero is, typically, most likely because it usually represents the lowest-energy arrangement of at...
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Nov 04, 2018 9:40 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: london forces
Replies: 7
Views: 225

Re: london forces

Yes, London forces are "universal" because they act between all molecules. They are the only interactions between non-polar molecules. The strength of the London forces typically increases as molar mass increases.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 28, 2018 8:22 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent Bonds
Replies: 7
Views: 93

Re: Covalent Bonds

Non-metals typically have high electronegativity. They acquire electrons to fill their valence shell and, therefore, they form anions.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 28, 2018 7:53 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Ionization Energy and Electron Affinity
Replies: 9
Views: 222

Re: Ionization Energy and Electron Affinity

Is there a trend for electron affinities?
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 28, 2018 7:42 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Ionization Energy [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 88

Re: Ionization Energy [ENDORSED]

Ionic radii decreases across a period (from left to right on the period table). The closer an electron is to the nucleus, the more difficult it will be to remove, therefore requiring a greater ionization energy.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:02 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Questions about the energy level [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 92

Re: Questions about the energy level [ENDORSED]

To think this through the relation of energy and wavelength formulaically, consider the formula: wavelength = hc/E. Because h and c are both constants, the numerator will always equal the product of Planck's constant and the speed of light. Wavelength will therefore decrease as energy, E, increases....
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:26 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Wavelength Calculations
Replies: 5
Views: 74

Re: Wavelength Calculations

Will all constants be provided on the test?
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:17 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Kinetic energy
Replies: 4
Views: 45

Re: Kinetic energy

The work function (Ф) is the energy required to remove an electron from a metal. If the energy of the photon, represented by hv, is greater than the work function, the electron is ejected with kinetic energy (1/2 me x v^2) equaling the difference in the energy supplied by the photon and the work fun...
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:17 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Balancing reactions tips
Replies: 29
Views: 551

Re: Balancing reactions tips

I have found it is easiest to balance the least occurring elements first, starting in compounds consisting of the most elements. Then, I leave compounds such as O2 for last because it is easy to balance the lone element of oxygen according to what the rest of the equation calls for.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:04 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Homework for Week 2
Replies: 16
Views: 206

Re: Homework for Week 2

For week 3 homework, do we have to answer questions from a specific outline?
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:41 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Formula M1V1=M2V2 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 421

Re: Formula M1V1=M2V2 [ENDORSED]

This formula is especially useful in diluting stock solutions.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 07, 2018 11:04 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Actual yield [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 76

Re: Actual yield [ENDORSED]

Actual yield will always be less than theoretical yield due to side reactions, impurities, etc.
Percent yield = (Actual yield/theoretical yield) x100
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:42 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: knowing how many sig figs to use
Replies: 17
Views: 367

Re: knowing how many sig figs to use

For problems involving multiplication/division, the product/quotient should be rounded to the least number of sig figs of the factors. For problems involving addition/subtraction, the sum/difference should be rounded to the least number of sig figs after the decimal.
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:27 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: MOLARITY
Replies: 10
Views: 195

Re: MOLARITY

With regards to molarity when diluting a solution, it is important to remember that the moles of solute remain the same. The unknown volume or mass can be computed by plugging known values into: M(initial)xV(initial) = M(final)xV(final)

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