Search found 69 matches

by Arshiya
Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:55 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Units for K
Replies: 4
Views: 71

Re: Units for K

Because the units for the rate is Molarity/second, the different ordered reactions will have different units for k in order to have the M/s rate unit. Therefore for first-order reactions, k is 1/s. For second order reactions, k is 1/M*s.
by Arshiya
Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:37 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Calculating Temperature
Replies: 1
Views: 41

Re: Calculating Temperature

For part c, we are calculating the certain temperature that changes the reaction from nonspontaneous to spontaneous. Therefore, we use the equation deltaG=deltaH-TdeltaS. Plugging in the values given for enthalpy and entropy we set this equation to 0>enthalpy-T*entropy and solve for T. You make the ...
by Arshiya
Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:32 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: P-T Graphs
Replies: 2
Views: 126

Re: P-T Graphs

I am not entirely sure if we need to know how to draw them. Lavelle never really addressed them in the lecture notes, so don't stress too much about them. They were present in today's review session, so just know how it was used in the problem that was given.
by Arshiya
Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:30 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: When to put Pt(s) in a cell diagram?
Replies: 3
Views: 68

Re: When to put Pt(s) in a cell diagram?

Pt(s) is put in the cell diagram when no solid is present in the redox reaction that is the metal electrode. Pt(s) is platinum and is added to the cell diagram to represent the inert metal electrode.
by Arshiya
Fri Mar 08, 2019 1:41 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Final
Replies: 3
Views: 65

Re: Final

Like stated on his website, the final will be a cumulative test of what we have learned from the start of the quarter until the end.
by Arshiya
Fri Mar 08, 2019 1:41 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: Reactions Orders
Replies: 2
Views: 52

Re: Reactions Orders

If we were to solve for the rate or rate constant, Lavelle would probably specify what type of order the reaction is. Or, similar to the homework problems, he could provide a table of experiments using different concentrations and rates for us to figure out the order of each reactant or the overall ...
by Arshiya
Fri Mar 08, 2019 1:38 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Slow step
Replies: 4
Views: 74

Re: Slow step

If it is not stated, find the rate of each of the elementary steps. The slowest rate should be the rate-determining step.
by Arshiya
Fri Mar 01, 2019 2:15 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Calculus Review
Replies: 8
Views: 105

Re: Calculus Review

I don't think you would need to know calculus for kinetics. Just know what the integral and derivative signs mean when used in the equations.
by Arshiya
Fri Mar 01, 2019 2:10 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Finding Gibbs Free Energy in Conceptual Situations
Replies: 2
Views: 46

Re: Finding Gibbs Free Energy in Conceptual Situations

Based on conceptual situations like these, you need to understand what is taking place in a reaction like ice melting. Since Gibbs is related to the change of enthalpy and entropy, see how these are changing when ice is melting. When ice melts, the entropy is increasing because ice is going from a s...
by Arshiya
Fri Mar 01, 2019 2:05 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Cell Diagram
Replies: 4
Views: 102

Re: Cell Diagram

I don't think it matters which one you write first, however, make sure to use a comma since they are in the same phase.
by Arshiya
Fri Mar 01, 2019 2:03 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Oxidation State
Replies: 4
Views: 63

Re: Oxidation State

For simple reactions involving elements like Zn/Zn2+ or Cu/Cu2+, it is easier to see which one is oxidized or reduced. However, for complex compounds or more complex reactions, it is better to identify the couple and then calculate the oxidation state for that half-reaction. Although it takes time, ...
by Arshiya
Wed Feb 27, 2019 10:17 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Units
Replies: 2
Views: 42

Re: Units

There is no specific preference used when calculating Gibbs. Just make sure you are using the same units though through the calculation. Gibbs is usually reported as kJ/mol.
by Arshiya
Sat Feb 23, 2019 2:28 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Driving forces
Replies: 2
Views: 53

Re: Driving forces

The driving force of dissolution can be determined by the dispersal of matter or energy.
by Arshiya
Sat Feb 23, 2019 1:46 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Test 2 Help
Replies: 7
Views: 117

Re: Test 2 Help

He posted on his website and stated in lecture on Friday that the Nernst equation will not be on the test. All the content covered in class this week including Gibbs will be on the test.
by Arshiya
Sat Feb 23, 2019 1:43 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: gibbs free units
Replies: 3
Views: 63

Re: gibbs free units

In addition, if the question asks for the Gibbs free energy of formation of the reaction the units should be kJ/mol. Just pay attention to what the question is asking.
by Arshiya
Sat Feb 23, 2019 1:41 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: electrochemical vs. electrolytic
Replies: 2
Views: 39

Re: electrochemical vs. electrolytic

In addition, in an electrochemical cell, the anode is negative while an electrolytic cell the anode is positive. Most importantly, in an electrolytic cell, the reactions taking place are nonspontaneous, while electrochemical cells have spontaneous reactions.
by Arshiya
Wed Feb 13, 2019 11:26 am
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Degeneracy at its max
Replies: 2
Views: 156

Re: Degeneracy at its max

In addition, when the entropy of the system is in equilibrium the entropy of the system is equal to the entropy of the surroundings.
by Arshiya
Wed Feb 13, 2019 11:23 am
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Work of the system
Replies: 3
Views: 63

Re: Work of the system

You can assume work is equal to 0 in a vacuum where the external pressure is 0
by Arshiya
Wed Feb 13, 2019 11:21 am
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: 6th edition example 9.6
Replies: 1
Views: 39

Re: 6th edition example 9.6

No, I don't think so. You should know the equations on the constant and equations sheet provided. In addition, you should know the equations for derived equations for entropy and work like Lavelle showed us in class.
by Arshiya
Wed Feb 13, 2019 11:20 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Chapter 8 number 21
Replies: 4
Views: 81

Re: Chapter 8 number 21

It doesn't matter which sign you attribute to the system or surroundings. As long as you understand the system and surroundings are equal but opposite in sign, you should get the correct answer.
by Arshiya
Wed Feb 13, 2019 11:18 am
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Ideal Gas C
Replies: 5
Views: 182

Re: Ideal Gas C

You can find those values according to the equipartition theorem for an ideal gas and use U=3/2nRT to substitute and find the values for Cp and Cv. It's on the constant and equations sheet. Just remember to use those for monoatomic ideal gases.
by Arshiya
Wed Feb 06, 2019 11:11 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Irreversible/Reversible Processes
Replies: 2
Views: 62

Re: Irreversible/Reversible Processes

In addition, in an isothermal irreversible reaction, the pressure is constant. Therefore, the amount of work done is -Pex*V. Because it is isothermal, no heat is lost or gained. In an isothermal reversible reaction, the pressure and volume are increasing or decreasing in small incremental steps. Bec...
by Arshiya
Wed Feb 06, 2019 11:03 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Units
Replies: 2
Views: 55

Units

I understand how to do the problems in order to get the enthalpy of a reaction. However, I am confused when the units should be J/mol or just J when calculating enthalpy.
by Arshiya
Wed Feb 06, 2019 11:01 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Midterm [ENDORSED]
Replies: 48
Views: 975

Re: Midterm [ENDORSED]

I also recommend watching Youtube videos in order to review major concepts. In addition, I like doing the worksheets Karen posts on Chemistry Community. I also like to take notes down while reading the textbook. Reviewing my notes, doing as many problems I can, and attending the reviews sessions has...
by Arshiya
Thu Jan 31, 2019 1:44 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: to change a system
Replies: 2
Views: 63

Re: to change a system

As seen in the problems in the book, I noticed that most systems we will be dealing with are closed like pistons. However, work can be done on an open system such as taking a coffee stirrer and stirring coffee. This action represents a force being applied over a distance and it interrupts the moveme...
by Arshiya
Thu Jan 31, 2019 1:36 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: open, closed, isolated system and calculating internal work
Replies: 1
Views: 52

Re: open, closed, isolated system and calculating internal work

2. Internal energy is a state function, which means that it is a property that depends only on the current state and disregards how the system was prepared. The internal energy of an object is the sum of the potential and kinetic energy it possesses. You cannot measure the absolute or exact value of...
by Arshiya
Thu Jan 31, 2019 1:21 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Reversible reactions
Replies: 1
Views: 32

Re: Reversible reactions

If a system is at equilibrium the external pressure is equal to the internal pressure. In an irreversible system, the external and internal pressures are different and therefore work must be done in order to restore the equilibrium. Because of this instability, the system will expand if the external...
by Arshiya
Sun Jan 27, 2019 3:40 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 3 Methods to solve for Enthaply
Replies: 3
Views: 56

Re: 3 Methods to solve for Enthaply

Because this post will probably be really long if I explained everything, I would refer to Lavelle's lecture notes. His notes break down how to solve the enthalpy for the reactions. If you want a review, I love watching youtube videos. I will leave several links below if you want more examples. http...
by Arshiya
Sun Jan 27, 2019 3:36 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Approximations for ICE
Replies: 20
Views: 222

Re: Approximations for ICE

In regards to equilibrium equations, you must see the K value when making an assumption. If the K value is less than 10^-3, then you can proceed using x. However, make sure you check your assumption with the 5% condition.
by Arshiya
Fri Jan 25, 2019 1:05 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Adding Inert Gas
Replies: 10
Views: 196

Re: Adding Inert Gas

Because an inert gas does not react with the reactants or products, it is essentially not changing the concentration of the products and reactants. In addition, the volume is constant so the concentrations remain untouched. Therefore, this will not effect equilibrium.
by Arshiya
Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:17 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: pKa and Ka
Replies: 1
Views: 139

Re: pKa and Ka

Because polyprotic compounds can dissociate multiple times, there will be multiple pKa values for every reaction that occurs. Depending on the information given in the question u will be able to find Ka for a given step.
by Arshiya
Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:14 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Ka and Kb as Inverses?
Replies: 7
Views: 118

Re: Ka and Kb as Inverses?

Just to be safe, I would use what we know. And kA*kb=kw is given so use that.
by Arshiya
Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:12 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Sig figs in pH
Replies: 7
Views: 56

Re: Sig figs in pH

Depending on the significant figures of the data given in the problem, you will have that many sig figs after the decimal for pH. For example say if you were given a K value of two significant figures a potential pH value could be 2.88. You can double check on the website under everything about sig ...
by Arshiya
Sat Jan 12, 2019 8:51 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Keq
Replies: 3
Views: 43

Keq

Is Keq different from Kc, or does it represent the same thing? Also, will we be marked wrong if we wrote Keq instead of Kc for the chemical equilibrium equation?
by Arshiya
Sat Jan 12, 2019 8:45 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: (aq) in calculating K
Replies: 9
Views: 97

Re: (aq) in calculating K

These short notations in a chemical reaction represent the form or state of the compound in the equation. "Aq" stands for aqueous solution, "s" represents a solid, "g" represents a gas state, and "l" represents a pure liquid form. When you see a compound with ...
by Arshiya
Sat Jan 12, 2019 8:40 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Change in concentration
Replies: 3
Views: 38

Re: Change in concentration

Because Kc measures the concentrations at equilibrium, it is a constant that remains unchanged even if more products or reactants are added as it is a fixed ratio. If there is a change in the initial concentration of reactants and products in a question, then you will be finding Q.
by Arshiya
Sat Dec 08, 2018 9:40 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong acids
Replies: 3
Views: 143

Re: Strong acids

a weak conjugate base means a stronger acid
by Arshiya
Sat Dec 08, 2018 3:22 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Relation between Equilibrium Constant and pH
Replies: 1
Views: 43

Re: Relation between Equilibrium Constant and pH

when Ka is given you can set up the formula of ka=product of the product concentrations/product of reactant concentrations and solve for the [H+] concentration. Then you would take the -log to find the pH.
by Arshiya
Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:02 am
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: B(OH)3 conjugate base
Replies: 1
Views: 60

Re: B(OH)3 conjugate base

Because an acid is a proton donor, it will lose the hydrogen. Therefore, the conjugate base will be H2B03.
by Arshiya
Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:56 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Roman Numerals
Replies: 3
Views: 53

Re: Roman Numerals

The transition metals must have roman numerals that match the ion charge.
by Arshiya
Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:53 am
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Naming on the Final
Replies: 4
Views: 141

Re: Naming on the Final

I've been memorizing the table in the book in order to remember the names of the molecules. In addition, another helpful source is quizlet. There are many flashcards created to memorize these formulas. I do believe that complicated acids will be provided on the final.
by Arshiya
Sun Dec 02, 2018 4:45 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory Applied To Transition Metals
Topic: Transition Metals
Replies: 5
Views: 291

Re: Transition Metals

Transition metals have many oxidation states because they have the d shell where they can lose electrons from.
by Arshiya
Sun Dec 02, 2018 4:42 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Final [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 185

Re: Final [ENDORSED]

I know they have review sessions as Dr. Lavelle showed us the pdf in class. I just wanted to know if there would be a practice final like we had on the midterm?
by Arshiya
Sun Dec 02, 2018 4:40 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecular shape in relation to polarity and boiling point
Replies: 5
Views: 113

Re: Molecular shape in relation to polarity and boiling point

When looking at the Lewis Structure of the molecule, you can see if that molecule has single, double, or triple bonds. Depending on that, you can see how tightly bound the atoms are to the central atom. The higher the bond strength, the harder it is to break the bonds apart or leading to a higher bo...
by Arshiya
Sun Dec 02, 2018 4:35 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Final [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 185

Final [ENDORSED]

Will there be a practice final exam released on chemistry community like "garlic bread"? Or will we be doing practice during the review sessions this week?
by Arshiya
Sun Nov 25, 2018 2:14 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: sp orbitals
Replies: 3
Views: 79

Re: sp orbitals

The 2 and 3 represent the number of p orbitals that are being hybridized.
by Arshiya
Sun Nov 25, 2018 2:12 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizability
Replies: 5
Views: 112

Re: Polarizability

I may be wrong, but from what I understand is this means that the more electrons that are distorted or unevenly distributed within the cloud, the greater the separation of charge. This separation of charge makes the molecule highly polarizable.
by Arshiya
Sun Nov 25, 2018 2:05 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Electron-deficient compounds
Replies: 1
Views: 38

Re: Electron-deficient compounds

As far as the examples we've done in class with Lavelle, I don't think we need to know that for the test. But, its good to know what they are.
by Arshiya
Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:31 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Energy Level
Replies: 2
Views: 107

Re: Energy Level

I haven't gotten that far in the textbook, but I know hybridization can change the energy levels of the orbitals in molecules.
by Arshiya
Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:26 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: sp3 hybridization
Replies: 6
Views: 95

Re: sp3 hybridization

I believe it should also have an sp3 hybridization.
by Arshiya
Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:23 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Polar vs Nonpolar molecules
Replies: 7
Views: 149

Re: Polar vs Nonpolar molecules

Like stated above, you can cancel the net dipole moments in order to determine if a molecule is polar or not. However, I think just basing it off the Lewis Structure might not be the best. For me, I like to know the shape of the molecule so I can visualize how the atoms are rearranged and how the di...
by Arshiya
Sun Nov 11, 2018 5:11 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Dipole
Replies: 3
Views: 71

Re: Dipole

A dipole is when a molecule is separated by a partial positive charge and a partial negative charge. For example, H2O has a dipole moment. Oxygen is more electronegative and thus has a negative charge, while the two hydrogen carry a more positive charge. A dipole is quantified by its dipole moment w...
by Arshiya
Sun Nov 11, 2018 5:07 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Polarizability vs. Polarizing Power
Replies: 1
Views: 54

Re: Polarizability vs. Polarizing Power

Polarizing power is the ability for a cation to distort an anion. On the other hand, polarizatibility is the tendency or the likelihood that the anion is becoming polarized.
by Arshiya
Sun Nov 11, 2018 5:03 pm
Forum: Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Topic: Coordinate Covalent Bond formation
Replies: 3
Views: 169

Re: Coordinate Covalent Bond formation

A coordinate covalent bond is formed when two atoms share a pair of electrons, however those shared electrons come from one atom.
by Arshiya
Wed Oct 31, 2018 11:46 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: 2C.3 on homework
Replies: 1
Views: 97

Re: 2C.3 on homework

I am pretty sure we won't need to memorize all of them right now for the test. I remember Lavelle saying, the more we see them being used, the more we will remember. I wouldn't stress too much about that for the midterm.
by Arshiya
Wed Oct 31, 2018 11:43 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: S-orbital and D-orbital
Replies: 2
Views: 105

Re: S-orbital and D-orbital

As the number of orbitals increases, the s and d orbitals become very close in energy with s being slightly lower than d. Therefore, the 4s orbital will fill up first and then the 3d orbital will be filled. However, d becomes favorable when the electron has an uneven amount of electrons. Orbitals li...
by Arshiya
Wed Oct 31, 2018 11:36 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Hw #2.51 6th edition
Replies: 1
Views: 71

Re: Hw #2.51 6th edition

For predicting the number of unpaired electrons, you can either write out the electron configuration in order to see how many electrons are left in the valence shell. Or you can locate the element on the periodic table, and see what block it occupies. If you know the block or orbital, you can see it...
by Arshiya
Sat Oct 27, 2018 3:39 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Homework Question 1B.15
Replies: 3
Views: 90

Re: Homework Question 1B.15

Unfortunately, I think the only way to solve this question is by using the mass of the electron because kinetic energy has to do with the mass of the object that is moving at a speed. The equation would then be λ = 2(h*c)/m*v^2 and you would plug in all the numbers to get your value.
by Arshiya
Sat Oct 27, 2018 3:33 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Replacement for Modules
Replies: 7
Views: 189

Re: Replacement for Modules

I'm not sure if you have taken chemistry or AP Chemistry in high school, but a good resource is the ap books as they supply some of the same information learned in class. I know the ap books break it down and are much easier to comprehend than some sections in this textbook. So for refreshers, you c...
by Arshiya
Sat Oct 27, 2018 3:29 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Valence Electrons
Replies: 3
Views: 47

Re: Valence Electrons

Yes, valence electrons are only found in the s and p orbitals. So 2 electrons in the s orbital and 6 in the p orbital add up to the 8 valence electrons that are found in the elements.
by Arshiya
Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:10 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: CH 1 1.55 6TH EDITION
Replies: 1
Views: 52

Re: CH 1 1.55 6TH EDITION

For part a), I converted 3600 into meters and then multiplied it to the speed of light. The frequency found was 1.1*10^14 Hz. For part b), I used the equation E=hv, and solved for the E by using Plank's constant and the frequency found in part a. For part c), I used the energy in part b and multipli...
by Arshiya
Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:06 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Diffraction and Spectral Lines
Replies: 1
Views: 29

Re: Diffraction and Spectral Lines

I don't think they have a correlation at all. I know diffraction is useful for studying the structure of molecules. The textbook doesn't relate the two, however, they do discuss how this interference relates to the wave-particle duality of electromagnetic radiation. Spectral lines are calculated whe...
by Arshiya
Sun Oct 21, 2018 3:58 pm
Forum: *Particle in a Box
Topic: Shape of Wavefunction
Replies: 2
Views: 314

Re: Shape of Wavefunction

I know from previous replies, many have stated not to worry about that topic for the midterm or test this Wednesday.
by Arshiya
Sun Oct 14, 2018 3:57 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Photons
Replies: 4
Views: 101

Photons

I understand that a photon must have a high enough energy to remove an electron? However, why can't two photons combine there energy to eject an electron?
by Arshiya
Sun Oct 14, 2018 3:54 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Photoelectric Experiment
Replies: 9
Views: 113

Re: Photoelectric Experiment

In order to remove an electron, there has to be a photon and electron interaction. You can have a high intensity, meaning more photons interacting with electrons, however, this does not guarantee that electrons will be emitted. Instead, the photon must have greater energy than the electron in order ...
by Arshiya
Sun Oct 14, 2018 3:45 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Post Module Questions
Replies: 2
Views: 93

Photoelectric Effect Post Module Questions

For one of the questions, it states in order to interpret the results of photoelectric experiments the model of light needs to change from a wave model to a particle model. I understand the experiment and how it works. However, is it wrong to say the light needs to change from a wave model to a phot...
by Arshiya
Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:20 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs
Replies: 6
Views: 126

Sig Figs

If a question gives values with three significant figures and an answer is a whole number like 400, would I have to denote the answer with a decimal point like 400.?
by Arshiya
Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:17 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Two Limiting Reactants
Replies: 6
Views: 149

Re: Two Limiting Reactants

You could also have two limiting reactants if there are two different reactions involved in the question.
by Arshiya
Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:10 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Empirical Formula
Replies: 1
Views: 76

Empirical Formula

When solving for the empirical formula, when do we know when to round up or down? For example, if it's 8.7 moles, should we round to 9 or multiply by a value to reach a whole number?

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