Search found 31 matches

by 305154707
Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:27 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: cisplatin Ligands?
Replies: 1
Views: 22

Re: cisplatin Ligands?

Cisplatin is the coordination complex/chemotherapy drug [Pt(Cl)2(NH3)2], so the ligands would be 2 Cl and 2 ammine. Here's a picture of the complex- notice how the atoms are on the same side of the molecule (hence the cis title).
by 305154707
Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:10 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: confusion name to formula
Replies: 4
Views: 53

Re: confusion name to formula

Yes, I think you are exactly correct in that last statement. On their own, the cation and the anionic complex would have their own charges, but since the counter ion (the cation) is acting on the complex, the complex's charge ( in the square brackets) is -3. +3 and -3 cancel out so the whole interac...
by 305154707
Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:02 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Anionic complex name
Replies: 2
Views: 23

Re: Anionic complex name

These are the "fancy transition metal" names that we discussed in my section. Besides that, just add -ate to the ending if the complex has an overall negative charge.
by 305154707
Sun Dec 02, 2018 6:46 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Ozone and polarity
Replies: 3
Views: 41

Ozone and polarity

Still a little confused about why ozone ( O3 ) is considered polar (according to the solutions manual). I understand that it doesn't have a symmetrical shape, but how could this matter if there is no net dipole coming into play? The bonds in the molecule are nonpolar so how could this create a polar...
by 305154707
Sun Dec 02, 2018 6:40 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: 4.73
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: 4.73

A radical is a molecule that contains at least one unpaired electron. Most molecules contain even numbers of electrons. CH3 would be a radical because it has 7 electrons total. C(4)+ 3H(1)=7 electrons. I hope this helped a little bit!
by 305154707
Sun Dec 02, 2018 6:33 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic and Covalent Character
Replies: 3
Views: 61

Re: Ionic and Covalent Character

You can determine which covalent compound has the most ionic character by noting the difference in electronegativity between the two atoms. Surprisingly, H-F is a covalent compound even though H and F have a large difference in electronegativity. This differs from a bond like CH4 or a diatomic homon...
by 305154707
Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:03 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent/Angular Shape
Replies: 4
Views: 55

Re: Bent/Angular Shape

Yes I believe that the two terms are interchangeable. Bent and angular shapes occur when there are two bonded atoms occurring with an electron pair or several electron pairs.
by 305154707
Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:00 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: covalent character
Replies: 1
Views: 36

Re: covalent character

If there is great distortion of an electron cloud, it means that electrons are being dispersed over several atoms. The electrons are not hovering around the anion as we would expect them to be if the bond was very ionic or polar. Greater sharing of electrons gives greater covalent character. Hope th...
by 305154707
Sun Nov 25, 2018 5:57 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 6th edition 4.13
Replies: 3
Views: 48

Re: 6th edition 4.13

You can also base the bonding angles of structures with lone pairs off of those that do not have lone pairs. For example, if you find that your structure has three attached atoms and one electron pair, and is therefore trigonal pyramidal, we can base its angles off of a similar structure with a know...
by 305154707
Sun Nov 18, 2018 8:00 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Intermolecular Forces
Replies: 7
Views: 106

Re: Intermolecular Forces

Dipole dipole moments are forces of attraction between the oppositely charged ends of polar molecules. London forces (or induced-induced dipoles) are when two things are originally non polar, but when placed next to each other, they become polar. It is a short lived interaction caused by a temporary...
by 305154707
Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:52 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: polar molecules
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Re: polar molecules

In this structure, there is an odd number of attached atoms. The angles are also not on a flat plane. So even if all the bonds were non polar, the shape and number of attached atoms would not allow these forces to cancel out. Hope this helped!
by 305154707
Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:49 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone Pairs
Replies: 3
Views: 40

Re: Lone Pairs

Lone pairs have very strong repulsive forces. Atoms become closer together because the repulsive forces between atoms is less than that of a lone pair and an atom. You can determine the angle by 1. Counting how many domains there are 2. View the "normal" bond angle for the shape (pretend t...
by 305154707
Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:44 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Hydrogen Bonds and Van Der Waals
Replies: 4
Views: 73

Re: Hydrogen Bonds and Van Der Waals

All bonds have active Vanderwaals forces. The hydrogen bond might be what is determining the character of the connection, but it doesn't mean that the random interactions of electrons and partial charges aren't happening as well. Some Vanderwaal's forces are more noticeable than others, but they are...
by 305154707
Sun Nov 11, 2018 8:31 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Ionic compound
Replies: 4
Views: 53

Re: Ionic compound

Here's some practice problems I did. Hope this helps you out!
by 305154707
Sun Nov 11, 2018 8:22 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Bond Strength
Replies: 2
Views: 72

Re: Bond Strength

Lone pair electrons and bonding electrons repel each other because the electrons within them have the same negative charge. The lone pair can serve to push atoms closer together because the repulsion pushes other bonded electrons closer to each other. Hope this helped!
by 305154707
Sun Nov 11, 2018 8:18 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent vs Ionic Characteristics
Replies: 2
Views: 52

Re: Covalent vs Ionic Characteristics

A Na+ Cl- bond is ionic because there is a large difference in electronegativity. This results in the Cl- anion taking an electron from the Na+, hence the more negative charge that Cl has. For ionic bonds, the electronegativity difference is so great that the two atoms cannot share electrons equally...
by 305154707
Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:01 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Units for EN
Replies: 3
Views: 47

Re: Units for EN

There are not really any units for electronegativity because it is more of a periodic trend. However, a related charge difference can be measured by an electric dipole moment. This is notated by the greek letter "mu" and its units are called a debye (D, SI units: Columbs.m). However, I thi...
by 305154707
Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:52 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Dipole
Replies: 4
Views: 33

Re: Dipole

Hi ! This was discussed in relation to polar covalent bonds. In these types of bonds, one atom will always be more electronegative than the other(s), giving a separation of charge. In this case you could draw the arrow showing the direction of the dipole/dipole moment. A nonpolar covalent bond has a...
by 305154707
Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:14 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: "ionic character"
Replies: 4
Views: 61

"ionic character"

My lecture notes say that an increasing difference in electronegativity leads to an increasing ionic character of a covalent bond. Am I right when I say that all ionic bonds have a degree of covalent character or are they completely separate distinctions?
by 305154707
Sun Oct 28, 2018 3:32 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Units
Replies: 8
Views: 134

Re: Units

It helps me to memorize the units of Planck's constant/J (kgm^2^s^2) since I know that anything I enter into the equation from there will either have to be of these units or converted to them so I can cancel out. So mass would be in kg and velocity would be in m/s.
by 305154707
Sun Oct 28, 2018 3:20 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: wavelike properties
Replies: 4
Views: 103

Re: wavelike properties

An object like a car would have too great a mass to produce measurable wavelike properties. In some of the homework problems, cars yielded a projected wavelength of about 10^-38m. This wavelength would be too small to be considered noticeable, although we have detected it. Only very small particles ...
by 305154707
Sun Oct 28, 2018 3:14 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Indeterminacy Question
Replies: 2
Views: 72

Re: Indeterminacy Question

Yes. Delta x is the span of possible answers for the position of an object. So for example, if your delta x is 10 then your range is +/- 5.
by 305154707
Sun Oct 21, 2018 2:39 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Nodal planes and electrostatic interactions
Replies: 1
Views: 28

Nodal planes and electrostatic interactions

How does the presence or absence of a nodal plane affect electrostatic attraction? And what does this mean for atoms with multiple electrons? Also, how does this work with Coulomb's equation?
by 305154707
Sun Oct 21, 2018 2:23 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: "Energy can't be negative"
Replies: 1
Views: 16

"Energy can't be negative"

In the lecture and online modules, I remember that professor Lavelle said that energy cannot be negative. However, in my discussion section we discussed that the change in energy is equal to the negative energy of the photon. Can someone explain this to me and let me know when it's okay to explain e...
by 305154707
Sun Oct 21, 2018 2:13 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Conceptual Question
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Conceptual Question

Can someone help me understand the relationship between the quantum numbers and what they describe for the electron configuration of an atom? How do they relate to energy levels and subshells and such? Thanks.
by 305154707
Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:23 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Diffraction Pattern with Constructive Interference
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Diffraction Pattern with Constructive Interference

Dr. Lavelle showed a diagram similar to this during lecture. Can someone help me understand what the resulting marks of the experiment tell us about light? How would it be different if it was destructive interference instead of constructive?
by 305154707
Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:01 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Context?
Replies: 3
Views: 72

Re: Context?

Hello! Hopefully the visual attached helps! The diagram with the Balmer and Lyman series can be seen as the Line Absorption Spectrum we drew in class- just tilted sideways. The lines on the horizontal spectrum represent frequency in the system. Looking at the Lyman series, a long "fall" fo...
by 305154707
Fri Oct 12, 2018 10:31 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: De Broglie Equation
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: De Broglie Equation

The DeBroglie equation comes from a combination of E=mc^2 and E=hv (v is frequency) 1. Substitute "E" for hv, Planck's theory states " every quantum of a wave has a discrete amount of energy " based on E=hv. Broglie believed particles and waves had the same traits, so he set the ...
by 305154707
Fri Oct 12, 2018 10:04 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Extensive vs. Intensive
Replies: 2
Views: 87

Re: Extensive vs. Intensive

Concentration can also be an intensive property. For example, if you have 5.00g of a solution dissolved in a 150.00mL flask and 20.00 mL of the solution is removed and placed into a new solution (this is #25 on the molarity module), then the initial molarity will stay the same. Although there is now...
by 305154707
Wed Oct 10, 2018 4:17 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Threshold Energy Question
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Threshold Energy Question

This problem gives the work function for sodium as 150.6 kJmol-1. Then, in the following part of the question, it asks for the energy required to remove an electron from one sodium atom. Given that the work function is the same as the " energy required to remove an electron", why can't I j...
by 305154707
Wed Oct 03, 2018 12:00 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Post-assessment problem, neutralizing acids
Replies: 2
Views: 56

Post-assessment problem, neutralizing acids

On the post-assessment for the limiting reactant video module, there is a problem concerning an acid spill and a neutralizing anti acid ( see the attached file or problem 20 on the assessment itself.) The mass of the anti acid reactant is given, but the mass of the acid is not. Isn't this informatio...

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