Search found 62 matches

by Chase Yonamine 1J
Sat Mar 16, 2019 1:41 am
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Adiabatic proceses
Replies: 1
Views: 32

Adiabatic proceses

How do you find final temperature in an adiabatic irreversible expansion of gas?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:31 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Catalysts
Replies: 4
Views: 41

Catalysts

Can catalysts be part of the rate law?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:56 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Nernst equation
Replies: 1
Views: 28

Re: Nernst equation

I believe you meant E=E0-.05916/n logQ. We get 0.05916 from the gas constant (R) x room temperature in kelvin (K) x 2.303logx (which is the conversion from natural log to log base 10) all divided by Faraday's constant. So this equation is the same as E=E0-RT/nf lnQ only when temperature is at room t...
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Tue Mar 12, 2019 8:02 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Coefficients
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: Coefficients

No coefficients do not affect oxidation numbers, it only affects the amount of electrons you have in the reaction
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Tue Mar 12, 2019 5:35 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Largest E°cell question test #2
Replies: 4
Views: 66

Re: Largest E°cell question test #2

You would have to pick is the biggest reducing agent and the biggest oxidizing agent.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Tue Mar 12, 2019 5:32 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Test 2 #6 Ordering Reducing/Oxidizing Power
Replies: 3
Views: 77

Re: Test 2 #6 Ordering Reducing/Oxidizing Power

To add, for part C you would just simply look at the biggest reducing and biggest oxidizing agent.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:20 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Exponential Curve
Replies: 6
Views: 57

Exponential Curve

Why does a plot of [Reactants] vs time for a 1st order reaction give an exponential curve?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:10 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: Initial reactions rates
Replies: 3
Views: 43

Initial reactions rates

Why do we study initial reaction rates as a function of only reactants?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Mar 01, 2019 10:00 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Strength of reducing agent
Replies: 10
Views: 137

Re: Strength of reducing agent

The smallest (more negative) Reduction potential is a stronger reducing agent
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Feb 22, 2019 10:32 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Electrode Potential
Replies: 2
Views: 26

Electrode Potential

Why is electrode potential an intensive property and how will this affect the way we calculate it?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Feb 22, 2019 10:29 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: joules conversion factor
Replies: 7
Views: 94

Re: joules conversion factor

To add, if you follow unit cancellation (8.314 J·K^-1·mol^-1) /( 8.206 x 10-2 L·atm·K-1·mol-1)= 101.3 J/(L*atm). These two values are given on the formula sheet and they are the gas constants (R) just given in different units. Depending in what units you are given or solve for you can convert using ...
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Feb 22, 2019 10:21 am
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Spontaneity
Replies: 6
Views: 78

Spontaneity

How does Gibbs free energy relate to spontaneity and stability of a reaction?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Feb 14, 2019 1:09 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: 1 atm to 101.3 J/(atm*L)
Replies: 2
Views: 57

Re: 1 atm to 101.3 J/(atm*L)

Or if you follow unit cancellation (8.314 J·K^-1·mol^-1) /( 8.206 x 10-2 L·atm·K-1·mol-1)= 101.3 J/(L*atm). These two values are given on the formula sheet and they are the gas constants (R) just given in different units.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Feb 14, 2019 12:46 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Molar and specific heat capacity
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: Molar and specific heat capacity

To add, molar heat capacity units should be J/(K*mol) and specific heat capacity units should be J/(K*grams). They are both intensive properties.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Feb 14, 2019 12:42 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Expansion of a system
Replies: 7
Views: 104

Expansion of a system

How can one tell if a system is expanding or not? What criteria do we look for?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:16 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Isothermal reactions and delta U
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Isothermal reactions and delta U

If delta U equals 0, does it always mean it is an isothermal process, regardless if it is reversible or irreversible?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:30 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Delta U
Replies: 3
Views: 49

Re: Delta U

Delta U is the change in internal energy. Delta U is used to see the change of internal energy due to the transfer of energy through heat or work.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:21 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: delta H
Replies: 1
Views: 27

Re: delta H

Delta H represent the change of enthalpy of system. Basically, assuming a constant pressure, delta H describes a systems change in heat. A positive delta H represents that the system absorbs heat and a negative delta H represents that the system releases heat.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:13 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Entropy in Reversible Process
Replies: 2
Views: 33

Re: Entropy in Reversible Process

The entropy could vary in different parts of the system. But the total change of the system is 0. The inside and outside of the the system does not change in reversible processes.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:07 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Biological Systems
Replies: 3
Views: 47

Biological Systems

Why is it in biological systems, delta U and delta H are the same.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:01 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Heat
Replies: 6
Views: 81

Re: Heat

Yes, when heat is absorbed from the solution, q will be negative. In other words, the reaction absorbs heat from the solution and the reaction is endothermic. However, q for the reaction will be positive,
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:26 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Adding Inert Gas
Replies: 10
Views: 128

Adding Inert Gas

I understand that when pressure increases by adding inert gas, there is no effect on the reaction. But why is this? Is it because the inert gas affects the whole reaction ( both products and reactants) equally?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:22 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Delta H
Replies: 4
Views: 44

Re: Delta H

To add, when delta H is positive that means that there is more enthalpy (heat) in the products than in the reactants. This means that heat is required to be added into the reaction to produce the products.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Tue Jan 22, 2019 6:34 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Stability
Replies: 1
Views: 14

Stability

When given two reactions (with K) how can we determine which is thermodynamically more stable relative to its atoms?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Jan 17, 2019 10:08 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Relationship between pH and pKa
Replies: 2
Views: 65

Re: Relationship between pH and pKa

pH is the amount of hydrogen ions in an aqueous solution. pKa is the acid dissociation constant which tells you at what degree the acid will dissociate. It can also tell which side the equilibrium will favor. Basically, pKa tell you what the pH needs to be in order for the acid to donate an electron.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Jan 17, 2019 9:02 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: [Products] over [Reactants] cancellations
Replies: 3
Views: 48

Re: [Products] over [Reactants] cancellations

In the cases with weak acids we can assume that Ka is very small and does not affect the reaction. (if Ka is less than 10^-3 or 10^-4 to be safe). It is important to remember that x is not 0, it just very small relative to the initial molar concentration that it has not affect on the reaction.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Jan 17, 2019 8:36 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Hydronium Concentration
Replies: 3
Views: 38

Hydronium Concentration

Why is it when [H3O+]<10^-7 the solution is considered neutral?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:12 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Chem equilibrium module 2
Replies: 1
Views: 21

Re: Chem equilibrium module 2

No, you do not need to use the ice table. You should use the ideal gas law to convert from concentration to partial pressure of reactants and products at equilibrium. Pv=nrt divide by v to get P=(n/v)(RT) this is the same as P=(concentration)(RT) where R is 8.206 × 10-2 L.atm.K-1.mol-1 and temperatu...
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:55 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Converting Kc to Kp
Replies: 4
Views: 70

Re: Converting Kc to Kp

Just to clarify, Dn is the to total stoichiometric coefficients of the product - the total stoichiometric coefficient of the reactants. For example, if you had the reaction aA(g)+bB(g)----> cC(g)+dD(g) the Dn would be (c+d)- (a+b). Also, you are only allowed to use this when the product or the react...
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:32 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Audio Visual Test Question
Replies: 1
Views: 41

Re: Audio Visual Test Question

I believe you are talking about this question:A researcher fills a 1.00 L reaction vessel with 1.84 x 10-4 mol of BrCl gas and heats it to 500 K. At equilibrium, only 18.3 % of the BrCl gas remains. Calculate the equilibrium constant, assuming the following reaction is taking place. 2BrCl(g) ⇌ Br2 (...
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:33 am
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: SO THERE ARE SPECIAL RULES FOR SIG FIGS IN pH THEN
Replies: 5
Views: 116

Re: SO THERE ARE SPECIAL RULES FOR SIG FIGS IN pH THEN

Yes, I believe sig figs count only after the decimal point. For example, if the molarity .0023 is given the correct answer with sig figs is Ph=2.64 because the sig figs only count after the decimal point.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:18 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Complexes
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: Coordination Complexes

A tetrahedral complex has 4 ligands at the corners of a tetrahedron. While a square planar complex has 4 ligands at the corners of a square. I hope I answered your question.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:12 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Number
Replies: 7
Views: 90

Coordination Number

What is the difference between the oxidation number and the coordination number of a complex structure.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Sun Dec 02, 2018 4:28 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory Applied To Transition Metals
Topic: Transition Metals
Replies: 5
Views: 138

Transition Metals

What properties of transition metals allow them to have many oxidation states?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Sun Dec 02, 2018 12:38 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Lone pair location
Replies: 3
Views: 64

Re: Lone pair location

Lone pairs have a great repulsion strength. This means that lone pairs will repel the bonded pairs. For example, in H2O is not a linear shape because the 2 lone pairs repel the bonded pairs making the shape bent with 104.5 bond angles. In all, lone pairs repel bonded pairs. This makes the shapes &qu...
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Sun Dec 02, 2018 12:32 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: chelate
Replies: 4
Views: 45

Re: chelate

A chelate is a multi dentate ligand, meaning it is a complex containing a ligand that forms a ring of atoms the include the central metal atom. Therefore chelating ligands can bind cations tightly. They are stronger than coordinate compounds.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Mon Nov 26, 2018 12:04 am
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Hybridization and Electron Configurations
Replies: 3
Views: 52

Re: Hybridization and Electron Configurations

Yes, it is necessary. By drawing the lewis structures you can see the number of regions of electron density and therefore, you can see the number of hybridization orbitals.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Sun Nov 25, 2018 11:52 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR
Replies: 9
Views: 60

Re: VSEPR

I think Lone pair Lone pair bonding is the strongest. Then it is long pair bonding pair. And the weakest is bonding pair bonding pair.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:05 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Repulsion Strength
Replies: 7
Views: 71

Repulsion Strength

What does it mean when VSEPR models can predict distortions qualitatively but not quantitatively.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:02 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: H bonds and melting points
Replies: 4
Views: 74

Re: H bonds and melting points

H bonds have higher melting and boiling points because the intermolecular bonds are stronger. The H bond is a very strong bond because it is highly electronegative.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Nov 15, 2018 10:57 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Induced-dipole
Replies: 5
Views: 79

Re: Induced-dipole

Induced dipoles occur when one molecule with a permanent dipole repels another molecule's electrons. A molecule with permanent dipole can induce a dipole in a similar neighboring molecule and cause mutual attraction. Any pair of molecules where one is a dipole and other is a non polar molecule can b...
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Nov 15, 2018 10:51 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Vsepr Formula
Replies: 7
Views: 64

Re: Vsepr Formula

Molecule shapes can be predicted based on Lewis dot structure using the VSEPR theory. VSEPR stands for Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion. It states that electron pairs in the valence shell of an atom repel each other; their molecular geometry is the result of this repulsion. Basically, we use Le...
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Nov 08, 2018 10:10 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Attractive Force
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Attractive Force

Does increasing the size of an atom result in a stronger attractive force or a weaker attractive force? Why?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Nov 08, 2018 10:01 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polarizability
Replies: 5
Views: 67

Re: Polarizability

The greater the number of electrons, the less control the nuclear charge has on charge distribution, and thus the increased polarizability of the atom. Basically, polarizability depends on number of electrons and size of the atom or molecule.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:32 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Valence electron
Replies: 4
Views: 40

Valence electron

How do you determine the number of valence electrons of elements in d block elements?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Nov 01, 2018 10:35 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Electron Configuration
Replies: 3
Views: 42

Electron Configuration

What is the correct electron configuration of Br? [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p5 or [Ar] 4s2 3d10 4p5?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Nov 01, 2018 10:26 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Empirical Formulas with Masses
Replies: 3
Views: 95

Re: Empirical Formulas with Masses

1)Assume the sample is 100 grams
2)Convert to moles
3)divide the smallest mole amount
4)if necessary multiply the whole compound to get a whole number
5)add up the mass of the sample and it should match the mass of the compound given because it is the empirical formula
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Oct 26, 2018 9:16 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Bond
Replies: 9
Views: 138

Bond

In class, we discussed single, double, and triple bonds; however, is it possible to have a quadruple bond. And if so, what are the conditions?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Fri Oct 26, 2018 9:02 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: nodal/radial planes
Replies: 5
Views: 108

Re: nodal/radial planes

To determine the number of nodal planes, we simply must know that in the s orbital there is 0 nodal planes, in the p orbital there is 1 nodal plane, and in the d orbital there are 2 nodal planes. In other words, the number of nodal planes is equal to the value of the angular momentum quantum number,...
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Oct 25, 2018 2:20 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: E=hv
Replies: 14
Views: 275

E=hv

In the equation, E=hv, does E represent the energy of the photon or does it represent the energy required to remove an electron?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Oct 18, 2018 11:25 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Heisenberg Equation [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 62

Heisenberg Equation [ENDORSED]

In the solution manual, the formula deltax= 1/2(h bar/m*deltav) is used. The book solution manual states that h bar is 1.054*10^-34J. My question is how is this derived and is this a constant?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Oct 18, 2018 10:40 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Nodal Planes
Replies: 2
Views: 40

Nodal Planes

I know that this was mention in lecture; however in the d orbital, which d orbitals have nodal lobes on the plane and which have nodal planes on the axis?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Oct 18, 2018 10:34 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Shrodinger Equation
Replies: 2
Views: 75

Re: Shrodinger Equation

I believe that we must only know the concept. We use a wave function to describe an electron in an atom. We must also know that a wave function like EM waves can take negative or positive values . This can be depicted by a sin or cos function.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Oct 11, 2018 11:28 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Threshold Energy
Replies: 11
Views: 81

Re: Threshold Energy

Threshold energy is the minimum energy needed to eject an electron from a metal surface. The energy of the photon minus the threshold energy should equal to kinetic energy of the electron. This should satisfy the Law of conservation of energy.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Oct 11, 2018 10:50 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Photoelectric Effect [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 172

Photoelectric Effect [ENDORSED]

I understand that Dr. Lavelle explained this during lecture, however, I am still a bit confused. Can someone please explain how an electron is able to reach the detector if there is 0 Kinetic energy. Is there an attractive force of some sort?
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Oct 11, 2018 10:39 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Mass percent composition [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 213

Re: Mass percent composition [ENDORSED]

Mass percent composition is the concentration (mass) of an element in a compound or a component in a mixture. Mass percentage is calculated as the mass of a component divided by the total mass of the mixture, multiplied by 100%. For example, to find the mass percent of Carbon in glucose (C6H12O67) y...
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Oct 04, 2018 3:07 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: All students read this sig fig post [ENDORSED]
Replies: 90
Views: 7951

Re: All students read this sig fig post [ENDORSED]

Shuyi Yu 1B wrote:When finding the molar mass in the periodic table how many sig figs do we use?


We use the amount of sig figs given on the specific periodic table.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Oct 04, 2018 3:02 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: mol vs. mmol
Replies: 12
Views: 279

Re: mol vs. mmol

1mmol is equal to 1x10^-3 mol. the m in front mmol means milli or 10x^-3.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Thu Oct 04, 2018 2:59 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Molar Masses
Replies: 9
Views: 156

Re: Molar Masses

No, we are given a periodic table on all tests, I believe.
by Chase Yonamine 1J
Tue Oct 02, 2018 10:26 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: stoichiometric terminology
Replies: 3
Views: 74

stoichiometric terminology

In the question," How many formula units of the compound are present in 5.15g?" What does formula units mean?

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