Search found 29 matches

by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Dec 07, 2018 2:29 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Least to Most Polarizable/Polarizing Power
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: Least to Most Polarizable/Polarizing Power

O2- < S2- < P3- < Br-

Na+ < Mg2+ < Li+ < Be2+

feel free to @ me if I'm wrong
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Dec 07, 2018 2:20 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: calculating pH
Replies: 1
Views: 25

calculating pH

In my chem discussion my TA mentioned that the sig fig rules for logs are different, so if we're given a question involving calculating pH=-log(concentration) then how would we go about determining the number of sig figs?
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Dec 07, 2018 2:13 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Compound
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Coordination Compound

What is the difference between a coordination compound and a chelate? Is a chelate a specific type of coordination compound?
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Dec 07, 2018 2:05 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Lewis Acids and Bases and Bronsted?
Replies: 5
Views: 48

Re: Lewis Acids and Bases and Bronsted?

A Lewis acid can accept a pair of lone electrons and a lewis base can donate a pair of lone electrons. A Bronsted acid is a proton donor and a Bronsted base is a proton acceptor. Most Bronsted acids contain an H+ ion that breaks off while a lewis acid may have unfilled octects or have room to accept...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:43 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Neutral Ligands
Replies: 1
Views: 26

Neutral Ligands

Can someone list some common neutral ligands? Not knowing them confused me when asked to find the charge of a metal in a charged ion...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:32 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Fe coordination compounds
Replies: 4
Views: 46

Re: Naming Fe coordination compounds

When the coordinate compound has an overall negative charge then the Latin stem for the metal's symbol is used. In the case of Iron (Fe) its ferrate + ion.
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:24 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Oxalate Structure
Replies: 1
Views: 25

Re: Oxalate Structure

An oxalate ion has the formula C204 therefore the two carbons are connected by a single bond with two oxygens connected to each carbon one by a single bond the other by a double bond. However "polydentate" refers to a ligand with more than one site of attachment in this case oxalate is a b...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sat Dec 01, 2018 9:30 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: pi and sigma bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 65

pi and sigma bonds

Since single bonds have one sigma bond and a double bond has one sigma bond and one pi bond AND a sigma bond has the ability to rotate while a pi bond can not, would it be correct to say that a single bond is more flexible than a double or triple bond? or how would you describe that? Hope this quest...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:58 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: polarizing power and polarizability
Replies: 5
Views: 73

Re: polarizing power and polarizability

Polarizability of an anion is the measure of how easily its electron cloud can be distorted. Larger and more negatively charged anions (more electrons than protons) are highly polarizable. On the other hand, the polarizing power of a cation is the tendency to attract electrons of an anion distorting...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:42 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: net dipole
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Re: net dipole

A molecule has a net dipole if it is polar, therefore a molecule has a net dipole if it has dipole moments that do not cancel.
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:37 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 2SP^3 vs. SP^3
Replies: 6
Views: 56

Re: 2SP^3 vs. SP^3

Exactly, adding a number before the hybrid orbital just specifies the period it is found in. In this case period 2 would result in a coefficient of 2 before the hybrid orbital.
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sun Nov 18, 2018 4:03 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration of Rutherfordium
Replies: 2
Views: 56

Re: Electron Configuration of Rutherfordium

Actually I agree with you...this electron configuration would give Rutherfordium because it is in the 6d sub shell and Thorium is found in the 5f sub shell. Hmm...can anyone explain dis?
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:54 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Nickel Electron Configuration
Replies: 2
Views: 53

Re: Nickel Electron Configuration

Nickel would have 2 unpaired electrons. Nickel is in the 3d sub shell therefore it contains 5 orbitals that can hold up to 10 electrons. Nickel has 8 electrons and using Hund's Rule (which states that every orbital in a sub shell is occupied by one electron before an orbital is occupied by 2 electro...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:44 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: cis and trans dichloroethene
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Re: cis and trans dichloroethene

Well first of all the polarity of the molecules are different: cis-dichloroethene is polar while trans-dichloroethene is non polar. The reason for this is the placement of the chlorine atoms within the molecule. In the cis-dichloroethene the chlorine atoms are on the same side of the carbon bond the...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:53 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR
Replies: 3
Views: 43

VSEPR

What causes a bent shape in a 3 atom molecule?
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:35 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Induced dipole interation
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Induced dipole interation

Can someone explain what an induced dipole interaction is and why they occur (what causes an induced dipole interaction)?
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:31 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Bond lengths [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 59

Bond lengths [ENDORSED]

Can someone explain the relationship between number of electrons in an atom and strength of a bond?
by Ester Garcia 1F
Mon Nov 05, 2018 12:01 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Steps for Lewis Structures
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Re: Steps for Lewis Structures

To answer ^ this question, formal charge is used to determine the best Lewis structure of a molecule. The structure with less formal charges is best because it is considered more stable.
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:56 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Acids and Bases
Replies: 3
Views: 54

Re: Acids and Bases

A Lewis structure of an acid would have many electrons (nearly a full octect) since Lewis acids accept electrons and it is more likely to gain a couple electrons then get rid of all the electrons in order to complete an octet. On the other hand, a lewis structure of a base would have few electrons s...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:42 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Expanded Octet Rule
Replies: 4
Views: 56

Re: Expanded Octet Rule

Elements that exceed the 3p orbital have access to the 2 consecutive orbitals (so in this case the 4s and 3d orbital).
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Oct 26, 2018 4:09 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Calculating number of valence electrons in bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 49

Re: Calculating number of valence electrons in bonds

Basically, add up all the valence electrons of the atoms present (taking into consideration the number of each atom in a molecule) and add or subtract electrons if given an ion and according to the charge of that ion. (an ion with a negative charge means adding electrons and an ion with a positive c...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Oct 26, 2018 4:02 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structures
Replies: 8
Views: 76

Re: Lewis Structures

The number of dots (electrons) around en element correspond to the total number of valence electrons so after you've established the central atom and bonded the other atoms around the central atoms you add the remaining electrons (total valence electrons minus bonded electrons) to the other atoms su...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Oct 26, 2018 3:50 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Spin Magnetic Quantum Number
Replies: 6
Views: 186

Re: Spin Magnetic Quantum Number

I don't think the spin magnetic quantum number can have a value of zero because the quantum numbers are used to describe the position of an electron in an atom and specifically the spin magnetic quantum number describes the direction of the electron's spin. An electron has either a negative spin or ...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Oct 19, 2018 9:29 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Valence Electrons for d-block
Replies: 2
Views: 55

Re: Valence Electrons for d-block

You could also use the periodic table to determine the # of electrons in the d orbital. The number of electrons in the d orbital correspond to their order in the transition metal portion of the periodic table. For examples, Scandium is the first transition metal so its has one electron in the 3d orb...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Oct 19, 2018 8:57 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Tips and Tricks
Replies: 4
Views: 99

Re: Tips and Tricks

Another tip in memorizing the orbital drawings is that anything like dxz, dyz, dxy, etc have the lobes on the planes while drawings like dx^2y^2, dz^2, etc has the lobes on the axis. Of course, f orbitals are more complicated however I'm pretty sure there will not be a question asking for f-orbital ...
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Oct 19, 2018 8:29 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: s, p, d, f
Replies: 16
Views: 298

Re: s, p, d, f

Another distinction between the orbitals is the number of nodal planes. For examples, the s orbital has none, the p orbitals have one, the d orbitals have two, and the f orbitals have three.
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Oct 05, 2018 9:36 am
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Clarification on unit conversions
Replies: 4
Views: 127

Re: Clarification on unit conversions

Right! A meter can fit a lot more nanometers (10^9 nanometers for every meter) so it would make sense that the number of nanometers is greater, therefore multiplying the number of meters (by 10^9) to get nanometers makes sense.
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Oct 05, 2018 9:24 am
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Post-Module Assessment typo?? - Balancing Chemical Reactions
Replies: 3
Views: 112

Re: Post-Module Assessment typo?? - Balancing Chemical Reactions

The correct balanced equation would be CH4+2O2>CO2+2H2O not 2CH4+4O2>2CO2+4H2O. The coefficients of the equation can be further simplified by dividing by 2 therefore the balanced equation has a ratio of 1:2:1:2.
by Ester Garcia 1F
Fri Oct 05, 2018 9:16 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: diatomic elements
Replies: 12
Views: 308

Re: diatomic elements

My TA taught us another method to remember the diatomic elements. She refers to them as gens and ines. Ex. HydroGEN and fluorINE

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