Search found 29 matches

by Austin Clack
Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:43 pm
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Acid Rain
Replies: 3
Views: 245

Re: Acid Rain

CO2 also reacts with H2O to created acid rain.
by Austin Clack
Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:40 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Calculate pH or pOH [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 80

Re: Calculate pH or pOH [ENDORSED]

to be more specific the values that you're taking the negative logs of are the molarity of H and OH in solution, which can easily be calculated by moles/liters.
by Austin Clack
Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:37 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: proton transfer equilibrium?
Replies: 1
Views: 195

Re: proton transfer equilibrium?

All that is meant by this term is the process of a proton (H) being transferred from an acid to a base.
by Austin Clack
Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:35 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Are all molecules with a H amphiprotic?
Replies: 2
Views: 225

Re: Are all molecules with a H amphiprotic?

The ability of a compound to act as both an acid and a base makes it amphiprotic (donating and accepting hydrogen molecules). However, not all amphiprotic compounds begin with an H. Al₂O₃ is an example of such a compound acting amphiprotically without an H.
by Austin Clack
Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:28 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Strengths of H2S vs H2Se
Replies: 4
Views: 542

Re: Strengths of H2S vs H2Se

LDS forces do contribute to a higher boiling point and therefore a stronger molecule. As for these conflicting explanations, stronger bonds make boiling point greater and conversely, pH higher (less acidic).
by Austin Clack
Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:24 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Bases
Topic: Ethyl Alcohol vs Methyl Alcohol
Replies: 1
Views: 190

Ethyl Alcohol vs Methyl Alcohol

Why does ethyl alcohol have a high boiling point than methyl alcohol?

Their respective formulas are CH3CH2OH and CH3OH.
by Austin Clack
Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:16 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: As2O3
Replies: 1
Views: 176

Re: As2O3

Arsenic(III) Oxide (As2O3) is amphoteric because it behaves as both an acid and base in different circumstances. It dissolves in dilute hydrochloric acid forming arsenic trichloride. As2O3 + 6HCl= 2AsCl3 + 3H2O It also dissolves in warm alkalis with formation of salts known as arsenites. As2O3 + 6Na...
by Austin Clack
Thu Nov 15, 2018 9:08 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecular shapes
Replies: 3
Views: 92

Re: Molecular shapes

I think the best thing to do is familiarize yourself with geometric terminology. It's obvious that linear shape is... a line, however once shapes get more complex it's helpful to know prefixes that match certain shapes.
by Austin Clack
Thu Nov 15, 2018 9:07 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Formula for determining bond angle
Replies: 6
Views: 157

Formula for determining bond angle

Is there a universal formula for determining the bond angles of any molecule? If so, is this something we must know for test three?
by Austin Clack
Thu Nov 15, 2018 8:57 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Sulfite Ion?
Replies: 2
Views: 70

Re: Sulfite Ion?

I believe the smaller bond angle can be attributed to the presence of a lone pair of electrons on the sulfur atom. The lone electron pair exerts a force upon the other bond causing the bond angle to be smaller than expected.
by Austin Clack
Wed Nov 07, 2018 4:28 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Resonance Structures
Replies: 7
Views: 245

Re: Resonance Structures

I know this is a pretty simple question but, how do we indicate resonance structures? Can we just draw the structures next to one another or is there a more formal indication?
by Austin Clack
Wed Nov 07, 2018 4:26 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: List of octect exceptions
Replies: 6
Views: 186

Re: List of octect exceptions

There are three specific exceptions I believe we've covered so far. 1) molecules, like NO, with an odd number of electrons 2) molecules in which one or more atoms possess more than eight electrons, such as SF6 3) molecules such as BCl3, in which one or more atoms possess less than eight electrons. I...
by Austin Clack
Wed Nov 07, 2018 4:22 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent Bond Exception?
Replies: 2
Views: 103

Covalent Bond Exception?

Are there any exceptions to covalent bonds? What I mean by this is could a non-metal and a metal bond covalently instead of ionically?
by Austin Clack
Wed Nov 07, 2018 4:18 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Noble Gases
Replies: 1
Views: 266

Noble Gases

Are there any circumstances in which a noble gas would either pick up or lose electrons? I know they aren't reactive do to the stability of having a full octet, but what sort of reaction might occur if an electron were to be forcibly removed?
by Austin Clack
Wed Nov 07, 2018 4:15 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Question 2.75
Replies: 2
Views: 248

Re: Question 2.75

Furthermore, because this group has either 1 or 2 valence electrons, they are more willing to give it up to satisfy the octet rule. For this reason they are highly reactive because the removal of their electrons is relatively easy.
by Austin Clack
Wed Nov 07, 2018 4:14 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: First, second, third, etc. Ionization energy
Replies: 4
Views: 314

First, second, third, etc. Ionization energy

We've talked extensively in lecture about ionization energy trends but I was hoping someone could clarify the difference between first ionization energy and the others that follow. Does the relative value change moving from different levels of ionization energy?
by Austin Clack
Wed Nov 07, 2018 4:01 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Dissociation energy
Replies: 3
Views: 92

Dissociation energy

We discussed in lecture that dissociation energy is always measured to be positive I was wondering if there are any set of circumstances that would allow this value to become negative?
by Austin Clack
Wed Nov 07, 2018 3:59 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Bond length effect on bond strength
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Bond length effect on bond strength

So I know Professor Lavelle discussed the relationship between bond length and the corresponding strength of this bond. Shorter bonds = stronger bonds, but can someone explain why this is the case? is it because a shorter distance means the atoms' electrons are closer to the protons?
by Austin Clack
Wed Nov 07, 2018 3:56 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Cause and Effect of Electrons in a Molecule
Replies: 2
Views: 38

Re: Cause and Effect of Electrons in a Molecule

Yes, a larger electron cloud is more susceptible to distortion because the attraction forces between protons and electrons are less powerful due to increased distance.
by Austin Clack
Sat Oct 20, 2018 1:15 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: What is "parity"
Replies: 1
Views: 141

What is "parity"

I have heard the term "parity" used before in the discussion of quantum mechanics but I am confused about its meaning/aspplication. I know that it involves manipulating spatial coordinated but beyond that I'm lost.
by Austin Clack
Sat Oct 20, 2018 1:11 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: wave property
Replies: 4
Views: 93

Re: wave property

piggy backing off that last response... how is a photon's mass calculated when it does have momentum? If an object has no resting mass, does this mean it must have measurable mass taking momentum into account?
by Austin Clack
Sat Oct 20, 2018 1:09 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Wave properties of large particles
Replies: 3
Views: 88

Re: Wave properties of large particles

To explain some aspects of light you treat it as a wave, to explain others aspects you treat it as a particle. Dr. Lavelle's example of the baseball exhibits this "wave-particle duality". The behavior of relatively large objects, like baseballs, is most closely related to their particle na...
by Austin Clack
Fri Oct 12, 2018 3:41 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: sig fig calculations
Replies: 3
Views: 352

sig fig calculations

In high school chemistry I was taught that there are a variety of sig fig rules about calculating. For example, when doing addition or subtraction with measured values, the answer should have the same precision as the least precise measurement. Does anyone know if these rules still apply, or if our ...
by Austin Clack
Fri Oct 12, 2018 3:36 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Units?
Replies: 8
Views: 353

Re: Units?

whenever you're dealing with molarity, like others have said, you must use liters as your standard units. While oftentimes questions may be phrased with mL instead, always convert. Technically you can do this conversion once you've finished all your calculations, but I think its best to always conve...
by Austin Clack
Fri Oct 12, 2018 3:30 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Plack's constant
Replies: 2
Views: 55

Plack's constant

So I have a pretty theoretical question... what if in some environment, Planck's constant was to be equal to 0? Is this possible? Under what conditions could this occur?
by Austin Clack
Thu Oct 04, 2018 7:21 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: How to write empirical/ molecular formulas
Replies: 3
Views: 94

Re: How to write empirical/ molecular formulas

Like the other responses said, carbon is written first, followed by hydrogen, then alphabetic order. This is called the Hill System. I will add that if neither carbon or hydrogen are present then resort to writing the other molecules in alphabet order.
by Austin Clack
Thu Oct 04, 2018 7:18 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Limiting reactants [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 91

Re: Limiting reactants [ENDORSED]

It could be the limiting reactant, however, just because the other reactant's grams aren't specified does not mean it isn't. While both can't be limiting, there may be more information in the problem for you to be able to solve the mass of the other reactant, such as a given amount of moles.
by Austin Clack
Thu Oct 04, 2018 7:14 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Combustion
Replies: 6
Views: 170

Re: Combustion

Yes you are right. In a chemical equation oxygen is necessary for combustion. This will always yield water vapor and CO2, like others have said. However, the additional product of energy is present as well.
by Austin Clack
Thu Oct 04, 2018 7:06 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: E. 15 (7th Edition)
Replies: 2
Views: 69

E. 15 (7th Edition)

Problem E.15 in the 7th edition textbook of a metal hydroxide without specifying what the metal is. I was able to deduce that the metal is calcium, however, the question refers to the "mass of the sulfide of this metal'. How is sulfide involved in this problem?

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