Search found 65 matches

by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:07 am
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: catalyst vs intermediate
Replies: 9
Views: 136

Re: catalyst vs intermediate

How can I tell the difference between a catalyst and an intermediate? Adding on to this, if a molecule is cancelled out in step 1 on the reactants side of the equation when you are taking one of the approaches to solve the mechanism it is known as the catalyst, since it has been there from the begi...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:04 am
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: lyndon's review?
Replies: 5
Views: 340

Re: lyndon's review?

Julia Lee wrote:Do you guys know what he said he's gonna call his review sheet?

He might come into lecture on Friday and make an announcement before the class.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Mar 14, 2019 11:57 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: frequency factor
Replies: 2
Views: 53

Re: frequency factor

I'm not positive, but I know that we will be given A (frequency factor or pre-exponential factor) in the problem, when asked to solve for the rate constant.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Mar 14, 2019 11:52 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Solving for Arrhenius Equation
Replies: 2
Views: 52

Re: Solving for Arrhenius Equation

Maybe try to separate your calculations into solving for -Ea/RT first, then plug that answer into e^(answer). After that try multiplying your value by A, and you should end up with the right rate constant. k (rate constant) is highly dependent on Ea, the activation energy.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Mar 14, 2019 11:42 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Catalysts vs Intermediates
Replies: 4
Views: 54

Re: Catalysts vs Intermediates

Adding on to this, if a molecule is cancelled out in step 1 on the reactants side of the equation when you are taking one of the approaches to solve the mechanism it is known as the catalyst, since it has been there from the beginning and is not consumed. You will be able to tell an intermediate, if...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Mar 07, 2019 9:04 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Test #2
Replies: 6
Views: 153

Re: Test #2

I believe one of the TA's will be holding a review session next week where they will be going through the entire test.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Mar 07, 2019 9:00 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Average rate
Replies: 2
Views: 65

Re: Average rate

I believe we just need to know the definition, which is that the average rate is the change in [R] or [P] per unit of time. (Average rate= change in concentration/change in time). We only need to solve for the average rate when we are looking for the gradient (slope). The average rate of reactants w...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Mar 07, 2019 8:44 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Lecture Notes Week 9 Wednesday (3/6)
Replies: 3
Views: 91

Lecture Notes Week 9 Wednesday (3/6)

Hi, I missed lecture on Wednesday due to travelling to NCAA Championships with Athletics. I was wondering if anyone could please post a picture of their notes? Thank you.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Mar 02, 2019 4:21 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Differential rate law
Replies: 1
Views: 56

Re: Differential rate law

A differential rate law expresses the reaction rate in terms of changes in the concentration of one or more reactants (Δ[R]) over a specific time interval (Δt). They change based on the reactants and each order of reactant (n), which then gives us further insight into the reaction mechanism. I belie...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Mar 02, 2019 3:38 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Unique rates
Replies: 5
Views: 94

Re: Unique rates

How do you know when to solve for a unique rate, rather than just a normal instantaneous rate? Is it when there is only one [R] and one [P] on either side of the reaction?
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Mar 02, 2019 3:34 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Nernst
Replies: 4
Views: 84

Re: Nernst

MadelineHlobik wrote:What sort of energy/cell potential does Nernst equation tell us?


I believe the Nernst equation tells us the equilibrium potentials of the cell. For each ion, the equilibrium potential is the membrane potential where the net flow is zero through any open channel.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Feb 23, 2019 6:41 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Faradays Constant
Replies: 4
Views: 95

Re: Faradays Constant

Gibbs free energy= -nFE
Where n stands for the number of molecules of that compound.
F is Faradays constant.
E is the cell potential for the entire cell.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Feb 23, 2019 6:30 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: test 3
Replies: 10
Views: 189

Re: test 3

Yes, it starts with everything from Gibbs free energy and goes until and not including the Nernst equation. (Weeks 6-7 material)
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Feb 23, 2019 6:26 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Galvanic vs. Voltaic cells
Replies: 1
Views: 39

Galvanic vs. Voltaic cells

What is the difference between a galvanic and a voltaic cell?
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Feb 17, 2019 8:59 am
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Gibbs Free Energy Signs
Replies: 4
Views: 87

Re: Gibbs Free Energy Signs

When K=1, Gibbs free energy will =0.
When K<1, Gibbs free energy will be + and will result in a non spontaneous reaction.
When K>1, Gibbs free energy will be - and will be a spontaneous reaction.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Feb 17, 2019 8:56 am
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Differences in Gibbs Free Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 56

Differences in Gibbs Free Energy

What happens when K<1, and Gibbs free energy is a positive value, assuming P and R are in their standard states?
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Feb 17, 2019 8:53 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Van't Hoff Equation
Replies: 1
Views: 167

Van't Hoff Equation

I'm a little confused on why the Van't Hoff equation shows the temperature dependence of K. I understand that it relates the difference in standard Gibbs free energy to K, because it's easy to measure, but why does it show that the temperature depends on K?
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Feb 10, 2019 4:00 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: midterm
Replies: 5
Views: 106

Re: midterm

Yes, I believe the midterm covers outlines 1-4 all the way until the end of entropy.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Feb 10, 2019 3:59 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Clarifying about Midterm
Replies: 4
Views: 95

Re: Clarifying about Midterm

I believe we should be focusing on the topics that are on the outlines all the way through the end of entropy. It's easier if you read based off of the outlines Dr. Lavelle gives us.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Feb 10, 2019 3:53 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Residual entropy
Replies: 2
Views: 54

Re: Residual entropy

Residual entropy is the difference in entropy between a state that is not in equilibrium and the state of a substance close to absolute zero. An example is carbon monoxide, which has a dipole moment.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Feb 02, 2019 4:16 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: State functions and Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 112

State functions and Energy

Other than the definitions of the different types of energy: internal, transitional, rotational, and vibrational, will we ever be asked to describe the type of energy that is being absorbed or released from the system in a question?
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Feb 02, 2019 4:06 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Reversible rxn
Replies: 5
Views: 105

Re: Reversible rxn

The higher the temperature, the higher the gas pressure will be, so the expansion takes place against a stronger opposing force and therefore must do more work. So therefore, the reversible reaction will be doing more work compared to the others.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Feb 02, 2019 4:03 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Calorimeter
Replies: 2
Views: 56

Re: Calorimeter

I believe we just need to know that a calorimeter is a device in which energy is transferred as heat is monitored by recording the change in temperature produced by a process taking place within it. Also it is important to know the equation: q=-Ccal (delta) T. Here, if delta T is positive, then q wi...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Jan 27, 2019 5:55 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Calculating pH of a weak acid and its salt
Replies: 4
Views: 229

Re: Calculating pH of a weak acid and its salt

Yes, the steps are exactly the same as calculating without a salt (though the calculations might be a bit more difficult). In these types of problems, the thing to note is that the initial concentration for the salt (or product of the salt) will not be zero. Therefore, the equilibrium concentration...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Jan 27, 2019 5:49 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Exothermic vs. Endothermic
Replies: 10
Views: 193

Exothermic vs. Endothermic

Can someone please explain the difference between endothermic and exothermic?
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Jan 27, 2019 5:46 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5%
Replies: 10
Views: 189

Re: 5%

Yes, I agree. The 5% rule states that your amount has to be within this range of the initial concentration, if it is not you will have to solve for the variable using the quadratic formula and you would pick the positive x value that’s within the range.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Jan 19, 2019 6:31 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Enthalpy of Halogen Breakdown
Replies: 1
Views: 37

Re: Enthalpy of Halogen Breakdown

Delta H is the change in enthalpy and if delta H is greater than zero, this means that a system absorbed heat and is known as an endothermic reaction. When delta H is less than zero, this means that a system released heat and the change in enthalpy had a much larger initial enthalpy value than the f...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Jan 19, 2019 6:18 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Le Chateliers Principle
Replies: 4
Views: 88

Re: Le Chateliers Principle

When a forward reaction is exothermic and is at equilibrium, increasing the temperature decreases the value of the equilibrium constant (k). If the forward reaction is endothermic, increasing the temperature increases the value of the equilibrium constant (k). When pressure increases, the equilibriu...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Jan 19, 2019 6:10 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Acid and Base Salt Equation
Replies: 1
Views: 73

Re: Acid and Base Salt Equation

This is a double replacement reaction, and we assume the aluminum ion is attached to a H2O molecule, because it is formed with a ligand complex that forms when AlCl3 reaches equilibrium. Al(H2O)5 OH2 is Pentaaqua-hydroxyaluminum(iii) ion.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Jan 13, 2019 9:17 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: K and Q rules
Replies: 3
Views: 93

K and Q rules

Would it be best if we memorized the rules of when k is large, small, Q>k, Q<k, and Q=k rather than just going through the process of what occurred in the reaction?
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Jan 13, 2019 9:12 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Denoting brackets/parentheses
Replies: 9
Views: 128

Denoting brackets/parentheses

Can someone please clarify when we use brackets vs. parentheses to denote materials in the gas law?
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sun Jan 13, 2019 9:09 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: K and Q
Replies: 7
Views: 99

Re: K and Q

I agree with the above statements, and Q is known as the reaction coefficient, which is similar to k, but it can be used in any stage of the reaction, where k is used and solids and liquids do not contribute into k. K is the equilibrium constant and the rate of the forward reaction will equal the ra...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Fri Dec 07, 2018 8:05 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Finals
Replies: 4
Views: 318

Re: Finals

Dr. Lavelle never clarified that, I would assume everything will be fair game, so make sure you understand everything on the outlines.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Fri Dec 07, 2018 8:01 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Can someone please explain the heme group/hemoglobin stuff?
Replies: 2
Views: 70

Re: Can someone please explain the heme group/hemoglobin stuff?

A transition metal is often found bound to a cage-like molecule, for example the porphyrin ligand. (4 nitrogens in a plane, creating a tetra-dentate square planar) Iron is bound to this porphyrin ligand, and therefore creates a HEME complex. A heme complex and a protein create myoglobin, which is th...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:53 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: amphiprotic
Replies: 3
Views: 269

Re: amphiprotic

I believe you are referring to amphoteric, which is when a compound has both basic and acidic character. Between metal oxides (bases) and nonmetal oxides (acids) there is a diagonal band, of these amphoteric oxides closely matching the diagonal band of metalloids.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:15 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Problem 9C.3 7th Edition
Replies: 1
Views: 26

Re: Problem 9C.3 7th Edition

I believe potassium's oxidation state is 3, because the name of the element ends with the number 3, in roman numerals.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:13 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: New IUPAC Name Convention - coordinate compounds
Replies: 1
Views: 45

Re: New IUPAC Name Convention - coordinate compounds

I think he wanted us to just look over them, and have an understanding of it. Dr. Lavelle might talk about it on Monday in lecture, and we will find out if it will be on the final.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:04 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: lewis acid and bases
Replies: 3
Views: 86

Re: lewis acid and bases

I believe the structure of the molecule tells you whether that specific atom is a Lewis base or a Lewis acid. For example, if it can attach itself to a molecule or ion that makes it a Lewis acid. The Lewis base has the lone pair of electrons on it in fact, so if it has a lone pair of electrons, it c...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Nov 24, 2018 10:54 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecular Shape
Replies: 7
Views: 140

Molecular Shape

Can someone please give an overview of when you would end up with a seesaw structure?
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Nov 24, 2018 10:51 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: van der waals forces
Replies: 3
Views: 64

Re: van der waals forces

Van Der Waals forces also consist of the potential energies of the dipole-dipole interactions of rotating polar molecules in the gas phase of the London interactions and the dipole-induced-dipole interactions.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Sat Nov 24, 2018 10:46 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Week 9 Test
Replies: 6
Views: 195

Re: Week 9 Test

Hi, I was told we should know everything on the outlines for "Chemical Bonds" and "Molecular Shape and Structure," I believe it will be a mixture of both conceptual questions as well as drawing the lewis structure, calculating the bond angles, and the molecular shape.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Wed Nov 14, 2018 8:57 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Remembering
Replies: 8
Views: 170

Re: Remembering

I believe we will only be expected to know the shapes that Dr. Lavelle will cover in the following lectures, I think there are seven or eight shapes we will have to know.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Wed Nov 14, 2018 8:50 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizability
Replies: 4
Views: 111

Re: Polarizability

Polarizability is the measure of how easily an electron cloud is distorted by an electric field. Typically the electron cloud will belong to an atom, molecule, or an ion. Anions have a high polarizability, while cations are positive having less electrons, which makes them have lower polarizability.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Wed Nov 14, 2018 8:46 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Formal Charge
Replies: 14
Views: 295

Re: Formal Charge

To add to the previous replies, the most stable structure would be the one with all of the atoms having a formal charge of zero. Usually we want the central atom to have a formal charge of zero, and if the whole molecule has a charge on it, then the outer atoms could have a formal charge that doesn'...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Nov 08, 2018 8:37 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7609
Views: 1019531

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

What do you do with a sick chemist?
If you can't helium, and you can't curium, then you might as well barium.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Nov 08, 2018 8:30 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole vs. Hydrogen Bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 61

Re: Dipole vs. Hydrogen Bonds

Dipole interactions are weaker since they occur when the partially positively charged part of a molecule interacts with the partially negatively charged part of the neighboring molecule.These intermolecular ion-dipole forces are much weaker than covalent or ionic bonds that are involved in hydrogen ...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Nov 08, 2018 8:24 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizability vs. Polarizing Power
Replies: 2
Views: 78

Re: Polarizability vs. Polarizing Power

The ability of a cation to distort an anion is known as its polarizing power. The tendency of the anion to become polarized by the cation is known as its polarizability. I believe they are always associated with one another and they go hand in hand.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Nov 08, 2018 8:21 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Homework 6
Replies: 5
Views: 169

Re: Homework 6

Hi, I believe we are allowed to answer any of the problems in the Chemical bond section, although it is best to do questions on the new material we just covered in class.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Nov 01, 2018 6:59 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Lecture 1 Example
Replies: 2
Views: 73

Re: Lecture 1 Example

I believe Dr. Lavelle wrote -1 since we know from the question that NO3^- has a negative charge, because it is an anion. Therefore we have to add one valence electron into the equation of our lewis structure. Hope this helps!
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Nov 01, 2018 6:53 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent Bonds
Replies: 16
Views: 346

Re: Covalent Bonds

For example a covalent bond would be (H-H) they can either be polar/non-polar. Since ionization energies are too high, it will therefore form between nonmetals.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Wed Oct 31, 2018 7:08 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 2B 3 c)
Replies: 1
Views: 36

Re: 2B 3 c)

Beryllium does not follow the octet rule because it doesn't require eight electrons surrounding it to be stable. Since beryllium is in the second group, it only has two valence electrons, which means it can only form two bonds. I believe it has 10 valence electrons in this specific problem, because ...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Oct 25, 2018 8:27 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Test 2 Material?
Replies: 2
Views: 154

Re: Test 2 Material?

I was told to just know the concept behind Shrodinger's equation and how it was derived, instead of being able to calculate it since it becomes complicated with derivatives. Hope this helps!
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Oct 25, 2018 8:25 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Coulomb on Test 2
Replies: 1
Views: 66

Re: Coulomb on Test 2

No, I believe we do not since we didn't cover any practice problems using Coulomb's equation of F=((qa)(qb)/(r)).
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Oct 25, 2018 8:20 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Momentum
Replies: 10
Views: 509

Re: Momentum

The momentum might not be given, for instance the question could give you the wavelength and ask you to solve for the momentum using the DeBroglie Equation where momentum is p=h/lambda. So you know lambda (the wavelength) and h is a constant given to you, so therefore you can solve for the momentum ...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Wed Oct 24, 2018 9:34 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Quantum Test
Replies: 11
Views: 411

Re: Quantum Test

kellyzhang1210 wrote:Do we have to memorize all the formulas we'll have to use?

I believe most of the formulas will be given to us on the coversheet of the test.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Wed Oct 17, 2018 8:30 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Work Function
Replies: 16
Views: 216

Work Function

Hi, will the work function always be given to us in the problem when solving for the kinetic energy?
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Wed Oct 17, 2018 8:24 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Heisenberg Uncertainty Equation
Replies: 3
Views: 83

Heisenberg Uncertainty Equation

When looking at problems that call for the Heisenberg uncertainty Equation, do we always solve for delta p (indeterminacy in momentum) first, because we are given the delta x (position), or does it just depend on what the question is asking for?
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Wed Oct 17, 2018 8:03 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Nodes
Replies: 1
Views: 26

Re: Nodes

A node is a point where the electron probability is zero, it is the point at which the nodal plane intersects. As with all orbitals the number of radial nodes increases as the principle quantum number goes up.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Oct 11, 2018 8:19 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Emission vs Absorption
Replies: 4
Views: 95

Re: Emission vs Absorption

When an atom absorbs a specific wavelength or light, they're gaining energy so if there's enough energy, an electron will jump to a higher energy state. I agree, whereas light sources with shorter wavelengths(higher frequencies), can eject electrons even with low intensity light. One photon interac...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Oct 11, 2018 8:07 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Light
Replies: 9
Views: 170

Re: Light

Amplitude is distance divided by the frequency. The wavelength can be found by dividing the speed of light by the frequency. The amplitude is how tall a wave can get, where the frequency means how quick a wave can be, as well as how many peaks are in the cycle. I believe that frequency and amplitud...
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Oct 11, 2018 8:02 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: H-Atom
Replies: 1
Views: 91

Re: H-Atom

I believe it states that the wavelength and frequency are inversely proportional; as one increases, the other decreases. So both sides of the expression have to be equal energies to cancel one another out, so that you are left with Rydberg's formula in the end.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Thu Oct 04, 2018 1:00 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: How does grading for discussion posts work?
Replies: 80
Views: 2583

Re: How does grading for discussion posts work?

AlexandraZuniga1L wrote:I also have a question regarding chemistry community, does anyone know by when we are supposed to post responses on here or new topics?

I believe we have to post our three questions or topics on this site before Friday's lecture to receive full credit.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Wed Oct 03, 2018 9:27 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]
Replies: 166
Views: 100974

Re: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]

tiffanyteguh1C wrote:Hi! Are there any good chem video resources that anyone recommends ??? (aside from Dr. Lavelle's videos)


Khan Academy offers some great resources that are available along with some crash course videos online.
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
Wed Oct 03, 2018 9:23 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Stoichiometry vs. Limiting Reactant
Replies: 1
Views: 62

Re: Stoichiometry vs. Limiting Reactant

Solving a stoichiometry problem involves solving for the limiting reagent. For step number 5 in solving a stoichiometry problem, you compare the calculated moles from the step before, with the required moles to determine if there is a limiting reagent. And with that being said, solving a limiting re...

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