Search found 67 matches

by Karishma_1G
Fri Mar 15, 2019 7:09 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Adding Pt(s) to cell diagram
Replies: 5
Views: 70

Re: Adding Pt(s) to cell diagram

The one exception to this that Dr. Lavelle mentioned was mercury since it is a liquid at room temperature. Though it is a liquid, it can still conduct electrons and act as an electrode.
by Karishma_1G
Fri Mar 15, 2019 7:08 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Adding Pt(s) to cell diagram
Replies: 5
Views: 70

Re: Adding Pt(s) to cell diagram

A cell always has to have a conducting metal. If the reactants and products of the redox reaction are all aqueous, the electrons will not be transferred. In these scenarios you have to have an inert (one that does not take part in the reaction) electrode to attract the electrons/create a current.
by Karishma_1G
Fri Mar 15, 2019 7:06 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Cell Diagram
Replies: 2
Views: 44

Re: Cell Diagram

In a cell diagram, a comma is used to separate two species of the same state. Vertical lines are used to separate species if they are in different phases. Additionally, it is convention to put a vertical line after the electrode on the anode side and before the electrode on the cathode side; the ele...
by Karishma_1G
Fri Mar 15, 2019 1:19 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Reducing/Oxidizing Power
Replies: 7
Views: 128

Re: Reducing/Oxidizing Power

Yes, higher oxidation power means more likely to gain electrons/be reduced. Therefore, the higher the standard reduction potential, which can be said to represent a substance's affinity for electrons, the greater the oxidizing power.
by Karishma_1G
Fri Mar 15, 2019 1:14 am
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: slow/fast steps
Replies: 7
Views: 85

Re: slow/fast steps

You will be given this information.
by Karishma_1G
Thu Mar 14, 2019 1:31 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Internal energy
Replies: 2
Views: 170

Re: Internal energy

Delta U for an isothermal reversible expansion is zero. These types of reactions usually take place in a heat reservoir. The energy that is lost when the system does work is replaced by heat energy from the surroundings. Therefore q and w are equal in magnitude and opposite in sign; q is positive si...
by Karishma_1G
Thu Mar 14, 2019 1:30 am
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Units of k
Replies: 7
Views: 224

Re: Units of k

The units of k are different depending on reaction orders because the units for rate are always the same (mol x L -1 x s -1 ). Since the concentration of the reactants are raised to a power based on their particular order, the units may go up in exponents. For example since concentration is squared ...
by Karishma_1G
Thu Mar 14, 2019 1:25 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Isothermal
Replies: 5
Views: 78

Re: Isothermal

Delta U for an isothermal reversible expansion is zero. These types of reactions usually take place in a heat reservoir. The energy that is lost when the system does work is replaced by heat energy from the surroundings. Therefore q and w are equal in magnitude and opposite in sign; q is positive si...
by Karishma_1G
Tue Mar 05, 2019 11:55 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Ecell
Replies: 13
Views: 218

Re: Ecell

You have to find the two half-reactions in the standard potentials table. Then you would use the formula E(cell) = E(cathode) - E(anode). The cathode is the site of reduction and the anode is the site of oxidation.
by Karishma_1G
Tue Mar 05, 2019 11:54 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Water
Replies: 13
Views: 216

Re: Water

Like others have said above, water can either be a solid, liquid or gas. However, it will never be aqueous since an aqueous solution is, by definition, one where the solvent is water. Water cannot be dissolved in itself (it cannot be both the solvent and the solute).
by Karishma_1G
Tue Mar 05, 2019 11:52 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Electrolysis
Replies: 4
Views: 88

Re: Electrolysis

Electrolysis uses a current supplied by an external power source to force oxidation and reduction for a non-spontaneous reaction.
by Karishma_1G
Tue Mar 05, 2019 11:51 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Nerst Equation
Replies: 4
Views: 85

Re: Nerst Equation

The Nernst equation is most often used to find the cell potential at a certain point during the reaction. The equation uses the standard cell potential and Q. If two out of these three variables (cell potential, standard cell potential, reaction quotient/concentrations) are given in a problem, I wou...
by Karishma_1G
Tue Mar 05, 2019 11:49 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Concentration cells
Replies: 6
Views: 102

Re: Concentration cells

A concentration cell is a cell in which the two half cells are identical except for their concentrations. Therefore, the overall reaction's standard cell potential is zero and the reaction is driven by the difference in concentration. For the reaction to be spontaneous, usually the anode (site of ox...
by Karishma_1G
Tue Feb 26, 2019 8:11 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Moles of electrons?
Replies: 6
Views: 89

Re: Moles of electrons?

I also usually balance the half reactions in order to see how many electrons need to be exchanged in order for them to cancel when you add the two half reactions together.
by Karishma_1G
Tue Feb 26, 2019 8:07 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Balancing Redox Reactions
Replies: 3
Views: 76

Re: Balancing Redox Reactions

He reversed it because copper was being oxidized in the reaction.
by Karishma_1G
Tue Feb 26, 2019 8:05 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Cell potential
Replies: 2
Views: 55

Re: Cell potential

No, cell potentials do not change based on stoichiometric coefficients. This is because a standard reduction potential is an intensive property, meaning that its value does not change based upon on the quantity of electrons/species reacting.
by Karishma_1G
Tue Feb 26, 2019 8:03 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Writing Cell Diagrams
Replies: 3
Views: 59

Re: Writing Cell Diagrams

Yes just like Joanna said above, you add an inert metal to act as an electrode when there isn't already a metal on both sides.
by Karishma_1G
Mon Feb 25, 2019 1:42 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Salt Bridges-won't they dissolve?
Replies: 5
Views: 85

Re: Salt Bridges-won't they dissolve?

The salt bridge isn't actually made out of salt. It is a tube with ions inside to prevent the charge build-up during the redox reaction. I believe that without a salt bridge, a positive charge would build up on the anode side and a negative charge on the cathode side which would preventing the react...
by Karishma_1G
Mon Feb 25, 2019 1:36 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Signs of delta G and E
Replies: 4
Views: 74

Re: Signs of delta G and E

For all spontaneous reactions delta G is negative. Therefore, using the Delta G = -nFE equation, we find that E has to be positive for Delta G to be negative. This is because F (Faraday's Constant) is a positive number and n (moles of electrons transferred during the reaction) will also be positive....
by Karishma_1G
Mon Feb 25, 2019 1:33 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Test 2 Topics
Replies: 2
Views: 60

Re: Test 2 Topics

Correct, Dr. Lavelle said this in lecture today.
by Karishma_1G
Mon Feb 25, 2019 1:33 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Balancing redox equations in acidic/basic solutions [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 75

Re: Balancing redox equations in acidic/basic solutions [ENDORSED]

I believe so since there are HW assignments on this topic.
by Karishma_1G
Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:54 am
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Delta S = nC In (T2/T1)
Replies: 2
Views: 59

Re: Delta S = nC In (T2/T1)

The C in the equation from the textbook is most likely referring to the heat capacity, whereas the C in Dr. Lavelle's equation is the molar heat capacity (that's why you have to multiply by the number of moles)
by Karishma_1G
Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:52 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Extensive vs Intensive
Replies: 5
Views: 110

Re: Extensive vs Intensive

Like stated below, an extensive property is one that depends on the amount of matter present. Volume, mass and length are all examples of extensive properties. Intensive properties, on the other hand, are those that do no matter on the amount of matter present. Examples include density.
by Karishma_1G
Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:48 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: deltaU=0
Replies: 3
Views: 67

Re: deltaU=0

Delta U is equal to zero for an isothermal reversible reaction because the heat that is entering the system is equal in magnitude to the work that the system is doing. For example, if -1000 J of work is being done during an isothermal reversible reaction, then 1000 J of heat is entering the system. ...
by Karishma_1G
Sat Feb 09, 2019 1:10 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Units
Replies: 7
Views: 109

Re: Units

I usually always try to use atm since the most common gas constant is in terms of atm. Additionally, you can use 101.325 J = 1 L x atm to convert between energy and pressure/volume.
by Karishma_1G
Sat Feb 09, 2019 1:08 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Conversions to joules?
Replies: 4
Views: 99

Re: Conversions to joules?

There are two conversions you can use to get your answer in terms of energy (Joules). 1cm3 = 1L and 1 L x atm = 101.325 J. Hope this helps!
by Karishma_1G
Sat Feb 09, 2019 1:03 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Midterm [ENDORSED]
Replies: 48
Views: 1149

Re: Midterm [ENDORSED]

I feel that the HW and Review Sessions are the best ways to prepare!
by Karishma_1G
Tue Jan 29, 2019 10:07 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: eq constants for acids
Replies: 4
Views: 95

Re: eq constants for acids

Strong acids do not have equilibrium constants because they dissociate completely.
by Karishma_1G
Tue Jan 29, 2019 10:05 am
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Units of Kp
Replies: 9
Views: 387

Re: Units of Kp

The units of the partial pressures of the gasses in Kp can be in bars or atm. However, it is important to remember that Kp as a whole does not have any units.
by Karishma_1G
Tue Jan 29, 2019 10:03 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Bond Enthalpies
Replies: 7
Views: 84

Re: Bond Enthalpies

Bond enthalpies are the least accurate way of measuring reaction enthalpies since they are an average of the different types of a specific bond.
by Karishma_1G
Sat Jan 19, 2019 12:32 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Understanding Q
Replies: 9
Views: 121

Re: Understanding Q

K>Q and K<Q is significant because it helps us understand whether the reaction has reached equilibrium or not. Since Q (the reaction quotient) is calculated at a specific time during the span of a reaction, by comparing it to K we can see if the reaction has to form more products or reactants to rea...
by Karishma_1G
Sat Jan 19, 2019 12:29 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Approximations
Replies: 4
Views: 71

Re: Approximations

You are able to approximate the value of x when the equilibrium constant is less than 10-3. We can approximate because x is extremely small relative to the initial value of the acid/base, so it will not substantially effect the equilibrium concentration of the acid/base.
by Karishma_1G
Sat Jan 19, 2019 12:24 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong vs Weak Acids
Replies: 2
Views: 53

Re: Strong vs Weak Acids

Yes, like Gavin said above, if the value of Ka or Kb is less than 10-3, then the acid/base is weak.
by Karishma_1G
Thu Jan 10, 2019 3:57 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Kc, Kp, K
Replies: 3
Views: 95

Re: Kc, Kp, K

Essentially K c represents the equilibrium constant in terms of concentration (mol/L). You can use K c with aqueous solutions and gases since both aqueous solutions and gases have concentration. K p represents the equilibrium constant in terms of partial pressure and can only be used with gases sinc...
by Karishma_1G
Thu Jan 10, 2019 3:50 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Equilibrium Favoring
Replies: 4
Views: 64

Re: Equilibrium Favoring

When calculating the equilibrium constant, the products are in the numerator and the reactants are in the denominator. Therefore, the greater the concentrations/partial pressures of the products, the larger the equilibrium constant. When the equilibrium constant is greater than 10^3, we say that the...
by Karishma_1G
Thu Jan 10, 2019 3:47 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Equilibrium Constant and Reaction Quotient
Replies: 3
Views: 58

Re: Equilibrium Constant and Reaction Quotient

The reaction quotient and equilibrium constant are calculated in the same way. The reaction quotient (Q) represents a value at a random point during a reaction where as the equilibrium constant (K) represents a value at exactly equilibrium (when the rate of the forward reaction is equal to rate of t...
by Karishma_1G
Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:07 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: DOWNLOAD SESSION WORKSHEETS HERE - Sundays 4-6pm (Karen) [ENDORSED]
Replies: 135
Views: 28606

Re: DOWNLOAD SESSION WORKSHEETS HERE - Sundays 4-6pm (Karen) [ENDORSED]

On Worksheet 9, question #6, why would acid 2 be stronger than acid 4?
by Karishma_1G
Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:33 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming the metal
Replies: 2
Views: 45

Re: Naming the metal

You only add the suffix -ate to the end of the metal if the overall compound has a negative charge (in your question, the compound has a 4 - charge). I believe that the latin root of iron is ferr- so you would add -ate to the end of that. However, for other transition metals, the root isn't differen...
by Karishma_1G
Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:24 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Ligands
Replies: 6
Views: 252

Re: Ligands

The central atom for a coordinate covalent compound is the transition metal/ion. The ligands are usually covalent molecules (water) or negatively charged ions (F-) that have a pair of electrons to donate.
by Karishma_1G
Fri Nov 30, 2018 6:23 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Triple bond?
Replies: 11
Views: 404

Re: Triple bond?

A triple bond has one sigma bond and two pi bonds.
by Karishma_1G
Fri Nov 30, 2018 6:21 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Exceptions
Replies: 4
Views: 229

Re: Exceptions

The general trend in electronegativity is that it increases diagonally from the bottom left corner of the periodic table up to fluorine (the most electronegative). In terms of this general trend, hydrogen can be considered an exception since it is on the left side of the periodic table but has an el...
by Karishma_1G
Fri Nov 30, 2018 6:17 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Pi bond concepts
Replies: 4
Views: 127

Re: Pi bond concepts

Pi bonds are formed between two p orbitals that are perpendicular to the internuclear axis. For this reason, the two p orbitals overlap above and below the internuclear axis and cannot rotate. If you have the 7th edition of the textbook, Figure 2F.4 on page 118 is helpful for visualizing this bond.
by Karishma_1G
Fri Nov 23, 2018 12:11 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Test 3 Question
Replies: 4
Views: 151

Re: Test 3 Question

In addition to VSEPR and Hybridization, I believe it'll also cover intermolecular forces and polarity.
by Karishma_1G
Fri Nov 23, 2018 12:06 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Test 3
Replies: 10
Views: 264

Re: Test 3

Based on what we've learned so far, the homework questions, and the outline, I don't think so.
by Karishma_1G
Fri Nov 23, 2018 12:05 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Why do we balance chemical equations?
Replies: 13
Views: 506

Re: Why do we balance chemical equations?

I said that we balance them because of the law of conservation of mass which states that matter cannot be created nor destroyed.
by Karishma_1G
Wed Nov 21, 2018 6:39 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone Pairs on Axial vs. Equatorial Positions
Replies: 2
Views: 49

Lone Pairs on Axial vs. Equatorial Positions

The textbook on page 110 (7th edition) says that for an AX 3 E 2 molecule, the lone pairs occupy two of the three equatorial positions where as the lone pairs for an AX 4 E 2 occupy the two axial positions. Why wouldn't the two lone pairs on AX 3 E 2 occupy the two axial positions like the AX 4 E 2 ...
by Karishma_1G
Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:28 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionization Energies
Replies: 13
Views: 243

Re: Ionization Energies

Yes, Helium has the highest ionization energy! This is because the electrons in helium are very close to the nucleus and so the electrostatic attraction is very high. This makes it difficult to remove an electron.
by Karishma_1G
Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:25 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: VSPER
Replies: 8
Views: 152

Re: VSPER

VSEPR stands for Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion and it is used to help determine the geometrical shape of a particular molecule. Since electrons repel each other, VSEPR assumes that a molecule will have a shape that minimizes these repulsions. In class Dr. Lavelle said that lone pair-lone pai...
by Karishma_1G
Fri Nov 02, 2018 9:44 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity Calculation
Replies: 5
Views: 109

Re: Electronegativity Calculation

I don't think we've learned how to calculate it so we just have to estimate it based off of the periodic trend for electronegativity (Fluorine is the most electronegative).
by Karishma_1G
Fri Nov 02, 2018 9:43 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Valence Electrons - Are electrons in the d orbitals considered valence?
Replies: 3
Views: 273

Valence Electrons - Are electrons in the d orbitals considered valence?

Do electrons in d orbitals count as valence electrons? I'm confused because d orbitals are written after the noble gas configuration but they're not the highest energy level (s & p will always be higher). For example how many valence electrons does Manganese (Mn) have and how many valence electr...
by Karishma_1G
Fri Nov 02, 2018 9:10 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Sig figs???
Replies: 1
Views: 99

Re: Sig figs???

You would use however many sig figs you used for your constants (h,c, etc.).
by Karishma_1G
Fri Nov 02, 2018 9:09 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Radicals - On Which Element Does the Unpaired Electron Go?
Replies: 2
Views: 116

Radicals - On Which Element Does the Unpaired Electron Go?

Hi, I was wondering how you know which element the unpaired electron goes on for Radicals. For example, how do you know whether the unpaired goes on the Cl or O in the molecule ClO (question 2C.5 part (a) in the 7th edition)? Thanks in advance!
by Karishma_1G
Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:24 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Losing Valence Electrons to Form Ions
Replies: 1
Views: 59

Losing Valence Electrons to Form Ions

Hi, I was wondering why copper can lose two electrons when it only has one electron in its outermost shell (4s). Wouldn't the ionization energy be extremely high to remove an electron from the 3d subshell?
by Karishma_1G
Sat Oct 27, 2018 10:58 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Effective Nuclear Charge vs. the Energy of a Shell
Replies: 1
Views: 55

Effective Nuclear Charge vs. the Energy of a Shell

Hi, I was wondering what the difference/relationship was between the effective nuclear charge experienced by an electron and the energies of the different shells (En) that the electrons are in (n=1, n=2, etc.). Thank you in advance!
by Karishma_1G
Fri Oct 26, 2018 7:21 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Exceptions
Replies: 4
Views: 123

Re: Exceptions

Yes, I have the same question! If someone could explain, that would be great!
by Karishma_1G
Sat Oct 20, 2018 4:35 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Topics We Need to Know for the Test [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 166

Topics We Need to Know for the Test [ENDORSED]

Hi! I know in lecture on Friday that Dr. Lavelle said that we only need to know what was covered in lecture up until Friday for the test. Does that mean we do not need to know electron configurations and periodic trends for the test even though it is on the syllabus for the Quantum World? Just want ...
by Karishma_1G
Sat Oct 20, 2018 4:31 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Superscript
Replies: 3
Views: 46

Re: Superscript

Yes, like Michelle said above, a superscript indicates the number of electrons in that subshell.
by Karishma_1G
Sat Oct 20, 2018 4:29 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: P orbital
Replies: 2
Views: 74

Re: P orbital

Yes, Dr. Lavelle said that -1 is P x , 0 is P y , and 1 is p z . He also said that some books use the opposite convention and -1 is P z , 0 is P y , and 1 is p x . However, in either scenario, 0 is always P y . Determining which axes for P orbitals may appear on the test but not for D orbitals. Hope...
by Karishma_1G
Tue Oct 16, 2018 7:39 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Formulas
Replies: 5
Views: 100

Re: Formulas

The formulas and constants will be given to us on test day!
by Karishma_1G
Sat Oct 13, 2018 5:13 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wavelength Units
Replies: 5
Views: 77

Re: Wavelength Units

It is better to use meters during calculations so that you can ensure that your units cancel out properly (ex: 1 joule is kg x m^2 x s^-2). However, when writing your final answer, it is better to use nanometers so that you don't need scientific notation. Hope this helps!
by Karishma_1G
Sat Oct 13, 2018 1:02 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Units for the Work Function of a Metal
Replies: 1
Views: 88

Units for the Work Function of a Metal

I am working on the pre-assessment for the Photoelectric Module. On question #27, it says that the work function for sodium is 150.6 KJ.mol^-1. However, I thought that the units for the work function is supposed to be just J. Do I need to convert KJ to J and then convert the mol^-1 to per Na atom? I...
by Karishma_1G
Sat Oct 13, 2018 12:39 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Units for v(frequency)
Replies: 11
Views: 162

Re: Units for v(frequency)

Hertz and s^-1 can be used interchangeably. Hertz is the unit for frequency which can be written and thought of as cycles/second. Thus Hertz and 1/second are the same.
by Karishma_1G
Tue Oct 09, 2018 9:12 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: DOWNLOAD SESSION WORKSHEETS HERE - Sundays 4-6pm (Karen) [ENDORSED]
Replies: 135
Views: 28606

Re: DOWNLOAD SESSION WORKSHEETS HERE - Sundays 4-6pm (Karen) [ENDORSED]

I've been looking for more practice!! Thank you so much for posting this - it's very helpful!
by Karishma_1G
Sun Oct 07, 2018 5:47 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Decimal point
Replies: 14
Views: 267

Re: Decimal point

120. definitely has 3 significant figures. 120 (without the decimal point) however is ambiguous and therefore it is better to use scientific notation: 1.20 x 10^2 (this would definitely have 3 significant figures).
by Karishma_1G
Wed Oct 03, 2018 4:49 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: state of compounds
Replies: 3
Views: 82

Re: state of compounds

I think that in a recent lecture Dr. Lavelle said that he would like us to put the states of each compound in the chemical equation.
by Karishma_1G
Wed Oct 03, 2018 4:44 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Rules For Significant Figures
Replies: 6
Views: 162

Re: Rules For Significant Figures

These are the rules that I learned and use when determining how many significant figures are in a value: 1. All nonzero digits are significant (ex: 345.23 has 5 significant figures) 2. Zeroes between between two nonzero digits are significant (ex: 103.106 has six significant figures) 3. Zeroes to th...
by Karishma_1G
Wed Oct 03, 2018 4:34 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Advice from a Medical Student [ENDORSED]
Replies: 133
Views: 83162

Re: Advice from a Medical Student [ENDORSED]

Hi Ashley!

Thank you so much for posting this! I will definitely take your advice.

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