Search found 30 matches

by Andrew Sun 1I
Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:25 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Proton transfer
Replies: 1
Views: 87

Re: Proton transfer

CH3COOH --> CH3CONH2?

Well, the compound does gain a Hydrogen, and if that is true, then the compound must be a base. However, we also see that the compound loses the OH- and gains a NH2-, further proving that CH3COOH is a base.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:20 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: How to identify Acids/Bases
Replies: 4
Views: 108

Re: How to identify Acids/Bases

If you are given a compound, identify the compound that loses an H+. For example, if in the reaction h3o+ becomes h2o, then you know that it lost a H+, or donated that. that compound will be an acid.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:17 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Identifying the acid and base
Replies: 3
Views: 99

Re: Identifying the acid and base

What is the acid and base in these reactions? a. CH3NH2 (aq) + H30+ (aq) ---> CH3NH3+ (aq) + H20 (l) b. CH3NH2 (aq) + CH3COOH (aq) ---> CH3NH3+ (aq) + CH3CO2- (aq) c. 2 HI (aq) + Ca0 (s) ---> CaI2 (aq) + H20 (l) acids are the compounds that donate an H+, so: 1. acid - H3O+ 2. CH3COOH 3.HI the bases ...
by Andrew Sun 1I
Fri Nov 30, 2018 3:55 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: H-Bonding and Dipole Dipole
Replies: 2
Views: 92

Re: H-Bonding and Dipole Dipole

when hydrogen bonding exists, dipole dipole exists. However, the vice versa is not true, as if dipole dipole exists, it may not be hydrogen bonding as H needs to be attracted to N,O, or F.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Fri Nov 30, 2018 3:50 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 2s or s?
Replies: 7
Views: 123

Re: 2s or s?

if a question asks what is the hybridization around the central atom, does it need a coefficient to specify which energy level?
by Andrew Sun 1I
Fri Nov 30, 2018 3:48 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted vs Lewis
Replies: 3
Views: 60

Re: Bronsted vs Lewis

If an acid is an electron acceptor, whilst giving away the H+ (which is essentially a proton), how does it take in another electron? or does the electron already exist to the acid?
by Andrew Sun 1I
Fri Nov 23, 2018 8:05 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Writing Pi Bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 74

Re: Writing Pi Bonds

The pi bond is not the entire double bond, just the single bond on top of the preexisting sigma bond. For example, a double bond consists of one sigma bond (C2sp2) and a pi bond (C2p).
by Andrew Sun 1I
Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:27 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone Pair distortion
Replies: 2
Views: 56

Re: Lone Pair distortion

A lone pair takes up more space in terms of it's electron cloud or density, so it'll push the other bonds closer together, resulting in a lower bond angle.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:20 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Double bonds
Replies: 8
Views: 171

Double bonds

Is there a way to dictate double bonds in our VSEPR drawings? If we have to draw in lone pairs, is there anything else we need to do as well to closer match the elements depicted by lewis structures?
by Andrew Sun 1I
Mon Nov 12, 2018 4:27 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Dipoles
Replies: 5
Views: 111

Re: Dipoles

Essentially you want to determine if the molecule is polar or non polar, and this will allow you to figure out if there will be dipoles. Using electronegativity values, if u calculate the difference between values and find that it is 0.5 or greater, then the molecule will be polar and therefore have...
by Andrew Sun 1I
Mon Nov 12, 2018 4:15 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 6.1 Sixth Edition Intermolecular Forces
Replies: 2
Views: 265

Re: 6.1 Sixth Edition Intermolecular Forces

CBr4 would have a VSEPR shape that is tetrahedral, and since the difference between carbon and bromine electronegativity values are 0.3 (2.8(br)-2.5(c)), the molecule is non-polar. Therefore, the only IMFs that would be present in a non-polar molecule are london dispersion forces.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Mon Nov 12, 2018 4:13 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole Moments and Polar Molecules
Replies: 2
Views: 91

Re: Dipole Moments and Polar Molecules

You find the difference in electronegativity values between the elements, and if the difference is greater than 0.5 than the molecule will be polar towards the more negative atom. However, if all atoms point towards - for example - a central atom, then the molecule is non-polar as there is no overal...
by Andrew Sun 1I
Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:13 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity calculation
Replies: 4
Views: 100

Re: Electronegativity calculation

To calculate electronegativity, you simply take the difference between the two elements. And using these values, you can see if the compound is polar or nonpolar, as well as having possibly ionic characters or covalent.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:09 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent attributes [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 71

Covalent attributes [ENDORSED]

Hello! Could someone explain why going down a family will increase covalent attributes? I think where I get confused is that since the atomic radius is increasing down a family, so that means it'll hold on to the cation with less force, and therefore act like an ionic compound and be more soluble. t...
by Andrew Sun 1I
Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:03 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: electron affinity
Replies: 2
Views: 241

Re: electron affinity

I would assume no, as they already have filled orbitals.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Mon Oct 29, 2018 11:54 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Formal Charges
Replies: 3
Views: 71

Formal Charges

Do the formal charges of each individual element of an ion always add up to the overall charge of the ion?
by Andrew Sun 1I
Mon Oct 29, 2018 11:48 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 2B.7
Replies: 3
Views: 112

Re: 2B.7

Some elements can have expanded octets, as explained in lecture on 10/29. Those elements that are in the third row can have expanded octets because the now have a d-orbital as well.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Mon Oct 29, 2018 11:44 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Finding number of elements that have given quantum numbers
Replies: 1
Views: 86

Re: Finding number of elements that have given quantum numbers

id just locate the fifth row of the periodic table, and then focus on the l value and which orbital it correlates to. For your example, it would be the p orbital, which means only 6 elements would have n=5 and l=1, those elements in the p block of the 5th row
by Andrew Sun 1I
Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:36 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: When to double the parameter to get delta v
Replies: 3
Views: 273

Re: When to double the parameter to get delta v

if a question says the speed is 3.24 +/- 0.06 m/s, would delta V be 0.12 m/s?
by Andrew Sun 1I
Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:31 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: EM Energy Spectrum
Replies: 4
Views: 152

Re: EM Energy Spectrum

pretty sure the values of frequencies will be given to us in the problem. Most problems state v= blank so i dont see why it wouldnt for those as well.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:28 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Angular Momentum Quantum Numbers
Replies: 3
Views: 88

Re: Angular Momentum Quantum Numbers

quantum number for l just describes the shape. It isnt necessarily always going to be l=n-1. For example, the third energy level has s, p, and d orbitals, meaning you can have l=0,1 or 2 for which electron you are describing.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Wed Oct 17, 2018 2:28 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Using the Equation
Replies: 2
Views: 95

Re: Using the Equation

The equation gives us the probability of finding an electron at a certain location/position, at an orbital or a cloud. I heard we won't be needing to know how to use the formula, just to understand its purpose.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Tue Oct 16, 2018 10:04 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Electron Configuration of Cations
Replies: 8
Views: 193

Re: Electron Configuration of Cations

It would just be the electron represented on the most right. for example, element (II) would have s2p5 and element(I) would be s2p4.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Tue Oct 16, 2018 10:00 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Indeterminacy vs. Uncertainty?
Replies: 4
Views: 124

Re: Indeterminacy vs. Uncertainty?

They're interchangeable terms, but i think Lavelle said something about uncertainty being used too often, and that indeterminacy is used because it is less used, if that makes any sense. However, im sure it doesnt make a difference what you use in terms of vocabulary or tests/quizzes.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:37 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Measurable wavelengths
Replies: 3
Views: 62

Re: Measurable wavelengths

In my 10-11 lecture, he said when the value is x10^-18 or more, someone asked that question too in my class. However, not sure what makes that value suddenly detectable as compared to other values, like if it is a specific threshold or boundary of a value.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:35 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Delta E values
Replies: 2
Views: 69

Re: Delta E values

Yes, when the original calculation gives a negative value it just signifies that there was a negative change overall, but you can't have negative energy. The negative sign is just there for conceptual understanding.
by Andrew Sun 1I
Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:32 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Calculators
Replies: 20
Views: 616

Re: Calculators

I use a TI-30X and it works wonders. Also heard a few of the Casio ones have a fraction button that would help you organize or visualize your work better!
by Andrew Sun 1I
Tue Oct 02, 2018 8:59 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Problem H. 11
Replies: 3
Views: 71

Re: Problem H. 11

the coefficients are 0,4,3,4
by Andrew Sun 1I
Tue Oct 02, 2018 8:51 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Confused about molarity concept
Replies: 4
Views: 161

Re: Confused about molarity concept

i think it means you need to mix in 9.8ml (the answer) of the 0.0380M KmNO4 into say a volumetric flask, then fill it up to 0.250L with water, and that will create the 1.50x10^-3M solution of KmNO4. At least I think that is how it can be interpreted, open to other thoughts
by Andrew Sun 1I
Tue Oct 02, 2018 8:47 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Audio-Visual Focus-Topics, Assessments & Surveys
Replies: 10
Views: 288

Re: Audio-Visual Focus-Topics, Assessments & Surveys

Currently doing the modules, and for the ones in which topics were covered in class, the problems he does are the same as the ones from class. Seems useful for reviewing for tests or if you miss class, or want to review prior to class though

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