Search found 30 matches

by Blake Salfer 1B
Thu Dec 06, 2018 3:44 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Name to Formula
Replies: 1
Views: 53

Re: Name to Formula

If there are multiple ligands you should put them in alphabetical order when naming the compound.
by Blake Salfer 1B
Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:44 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Amphoteric vs Amphiprotic
Replies: 4
Views: 83

Re: Amphoteric vs Amphiprotic

Amphoteric means a substance can either act as an acid or a base. Amphiprotic means a substance can either donate or accept hydrogen ions.
by Blake Salfer 1B
Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:42 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Conjugate Acid/Base
Replies: 3
Views: 73

Re: Conjugate Acid/Base

A conjugate acid is a species formed by the reception of a proton (H+) by a base, so basically it is a base with a hydrogen ion added to it. On the other hand, a conjugate base is what is left over after an acid has donated a proton during a chemical reaction.
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:32 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Charge on ligands
Replies: 2
Views: 75

Re: Charge on ligands

I assume we will have to calculate or memorize the charges of ligands on the test but, I haven't heard Dr. Lavelle say anything in regards to that yet
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:24 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization of bonds abbreviation
Replies: 2
Views: 69

Re: Hybridization of bonds abbreviation

I believe they are the same because the 2 in front just means that there are two sp2 hybridized orbitals
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:22 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: hybridization
Replies: 13
Views: 266

Re: hybridization

I usually look at how many other atoms are being attached to the central atom and if it is say 3 other atoms the hybridization is just one less; sp2. For 5 and 6atoms attached to the central atom you just have to remember you are using d orbitals so it will always have an sp3 and then however many d...
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 25, 2018 7:38 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Dipole-Dipole forces
Replies: 3
Views: 62

Dipole-Dipole forces

When looking at a molecule, is the only way to tell that it has dipole-dipole forces by determining if it is a polar molecule?
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 25, 2018 7:34 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Final Exam
Replies: 22
Views: 478

Re: Final Exam

I don't think Dr. Lavelle has stated what the final exam format will be yet and I haven't seen anything on the website either
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 25, 2018 5:22 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 6th edition 4.13
Replies: 3
Views: 87

Re: 6th edition 4.13

By drawing the lewis structures you should be able to tell the shape of the molecule and the bond angles correlate with the shape. For example trigonal planar has bond angles of 120 degrees and tetrahedral has bond angles of 109.5 degrees
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:55 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Electrostatic potential
Replies: 2
Views: 70

Electrostatic potential

Can someone please explain what electrostatic potential means and how it relates to shape and such
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:47 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization
Replies: 2
Views: 71

Re: Hybridization

Orbital hybridization is the concept of mixing atomic orbitals into new hybrid orbitals (with different energies and shaped than the component atomic orbitals) suitable for the pairing of electrons to form chemical bonds. To calculate hybridization you add the number of bonded atoms and the lone pai...
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:39 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: cis and trans dichloroethene
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: cis and trans dichloroethene

Cis stands for same side dipoles and trans stands for different side dipoles. Because Cis-dichloroethane has dipoles on the same side the molecule is polar. The trans-dicholoroethane is non-polar because the dipoles cancel out on different sides.
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 11, 2018 7:28 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: trigonal pyramidal
Replies: 3
Views: 59

Re: trigonal pyramidal

It is the best form because the bonding pairs and lone pairs are as far away as possible
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 11, 2018 7:17 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Radius
Replies: 7
Views: 240

Re: Radius

as atomic radius increases electronegativity decreases because there is less attraction between the nucleus and shared electrons as atomic radius increases
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 11, 2018 7:07 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Bond Length
Replies: 9
Views: 192

Re: Bond Length

I think it is the middle or average of the bond lengths so it would be 105
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:59 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: 2.43 Tungsten
Replies: 1
Views: 44

Re: 2.43 Tungsten

The 6s orbital is lower in energy relative to the 5d orbital than the 5s is relative to 4d or the 4s to 3d. Thus, the energy gained by not shoving two electrons into the 6s orbital, plus that from a half-filled 5d subshell, is not enough to compensate for promoting an electron from 6s to 5d.
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:53 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Electron Configuration
Replies: 4
Views: 81

Re: Electron Configuration

The 4s2 orbital is filled first, but when ions are formed the s orbital electrons are the first to go because they are at a higher energy state.
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:48 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: How to write P and D Orbitals
Replies: 1
Views: 74

Re: How to write P and D Orbitals

This is the correct way to write it because the 4s orbital has higher energy than the 3d orbital it should be written after.
by Blake Salfer 1B
Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:38 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: How do I identify excited state through the electronic configuration
Replies: 5
Views: 155

Re: How do I identify excited state through the electronic configuration

An atom is in an excited state if the electron configuration is incorrect. Like for A if there were two up arrows in two separate boxes in the 2p orbitals it would be in its ground state. For C it is excited because there is a electron in 2p instead of a second electron in the 2s. The only element i...
by Blake Salfer 1B
Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:33 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Heisenberg Indeterminacy Post Assessment #20
Replies: 2
Views: 104

Re: Heisenberg Indeterminacy Post Assessment #20

all you have to do is plug in the velocity found in the problem above into the equation Ek=1/2mv^2 and you will get the uncertainty in KE
by Blake Salfer 1B
Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:27 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: wavelike properties
Replies: 4
Views: 223

Re: wavelike properties

Dr. Lavelle stated that any wavelength smaller than about 1.0x10^-18 wouldn't be detectable. Basically anything besides subatomic particles have wavelengths that are too small to detect.
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:48 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Test question
Replies: 6
Views: 216

Test question

Does anybody know if we will have to write out ground states of electrons even though we never covered this in lecture?
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:46 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Atomic Spectra
Replies: 2
Views: 59

Atomic Spectra

Does somebody know what the correct answer to number 12 on the atomic spectra post-module is? All of the answers seem very similar and this is why I am a bit confused
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:33 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Quantum numbers
Replies: 5
Views: 89

Quantum numbers

If n=4 l=3 and ml=-3,-2,-1,0,1,2,3 where is the electron located? would the correct answer be 4f?
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Oct 14, 2018 8:15 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Rydberg formula
Replies: 5
Views: 150

Rydberg formula

How to you use the Rydberg Formula to calculate wavelength of radiation generated by the transition from n=4 to n=2?
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Oct 14, 2018 7:52 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Wave Properties of Electrons
Replies: 2
Views: 51

Wave Properties of Electrons

Could someone explain what constructive and destructive interference have to do with diffraction patterns and electrons having wave like properties. I am confused by what the importance is of the two types of interference
by Blake Salfer 1B
Sun Oct 14, 2018 7:00 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: 6th Edition Ch.2 Number 93
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Re: 6th Edition Ch.2 Number 93

The answer in the back of the book states that A=Cl, B=Na, C=Cl- and D=Na+. You are right about chlorine having the smaller atomic radius
by Blake Salfer 1B
Wed Oct 03, 2018 9:20 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Hydrogen Molar Mass HW E9
Replies: 5
Views: 340

Re: Hydrogen Molar Mass HW E9

I usually just use 1.008 for the molar mass of hydrogen but it all depends on how precise you want your answer to be. Your answer is close enough to see that you did the problem correctly, so I think it is okay.
by Blake Salfer 1B
Wed Oct 03, 2018 9:16 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: E.25 part a
Replies: 2
Views: 58

Re: E.25 part a

Yes I believe it is just asking for the number of molecules. Formula units is just a label similar to atoms or molecules
by Blake Salfer 1B
Wed Oct 03, 2018 9:07 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: limiting reactant problem
Replies: 3
Views: 67

limiting reactant problem

If you have the equation 2A + 1B = 3C and 1 mole of A is mixed with 1 mole of B, which is the limiting reactant? Please explain as well

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