Search found 17 matches

by Justin Haggard 1E
Sat Dec 08, 2018 9:14 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Shells, Subshells, Orbitals
Replies: 4
Views: 1315

Re: Shells, Subshells, Orbitals

Orbitals are arranged in shells (n) and subshells (l). The best way to visualize this is by looking at a diagram, so I've included one below:

Image
by Justin Haggard 1E
Sat Dec 08, 2018 9:09 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals
Replies: 3
Views: 352

Re: Orbitals

If you're referring to the quantum numbers, all you have to do is remember that they are connected in the following way: n is the principal quantum number, and is the shell (it is the first number you see when an orbital is listed, such as 2 s or 3 p, etc.) l is the angular momentum number, and it d...
by Justin Haggard 1E
Sat Dec 08, 2018 7:10 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: ions
Replies: 4
Views: 435

Re: ions

An anion has a negative charge, and a cation has a positive charge. To have a negative charge, there has to be more electrons than protons in the atom. Therefore, anions are atoms that have extra electron(s). To have a positive charge, there has to be fewer electrons than protons in the atom, so cat...
by Justin Haggard 1E
Sat Dec 08, 2018 7:03 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: adding "ion" at the end of a name
Replies: 4
Views: 166

Re: adding "ion" at the end of a name

Ion indicates that it has either a negative or positive charge. It is important to still calculate the charges of the atoms in the compound if you are writing the compound formula from its name, because "ion" will not always be included at the end of the name, even if it is charged. In oth...
by Justin Haggard 1E
Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:54 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: order of ligand name
Replies: 5
Views: 417

Re: order of ligand name

Just name them in alphabetical order, and then make sure that the transition metal is at the end. The charge of the ligands is unrelated to their order.
by Justin Haggard 1E
Sat Dec 08, 2018 5:45 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: radical
Replies: 5
Views: 285

Re: radical

Radicals are compounds with unpaired electrons (not octet in valence shell). They are highly reactive and unstable, and only exist for a short period of time. An example would be \cdot OH formed in the upper atmosphere when a photon hits a water molecule ( H_{2}O ) H-O-H \rightarrow H-O\cdot + \cdot...
by Justin Haggard 1E
Sat Dec 08, 2018 5:30 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR
Replies: 4
Views: 240

Re: VSEPR

Yes, Since the central atom (A) only has one atom bound to it (X), it has to be linear. The lone pairs denoted by E3 would not affect the molecular geometry since there are only 2 atoms present.
by Justin Haggard 1E
Sat Dec 08, 2018 3:04 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: pi and sigma bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 391

Re: pi and sigma bonds

Yes, a single bond allow rotation of the bound atoms. Dr. Lavelle explained that this results in the sigma bond having electron density with cylindrical symmetry around the internuclear axis, compared to Pi bonds that have electron density on each side of the internuclear axis. It sounds confusing, ...
by Justin Haggard 1E
Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:27 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization connection
Replies: 2
Views: 136

Re: Hybridization connection

Table 2f.1 does a pretty good job of explaining this correlation in 7th edition, but for example. If electron arrangement is linear, then the number of atomic orbitals=2, thus the hybridization is sp, and there are 2 hybrid orbitals. In addition, you can count the regions of electron density to fin...
by Justin Haggard 1E
Thu Nov 29, 2018 10:56 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Radicals
Replies: 3
Views: 162

Re: Radicals

Yes, they do.

Single bonds, multiple bonds (double, triple), radicals, and lone pairs each count as one region of electron density when determining hybridization.
by Justin Haggard 1E
Thu Nov 29, 2018 10:50 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Determining Empirical formula
Replies: 4
Views: 442

Re: Determining Empirical formula

You would need to find the moles of the entire molecules first, then use mole-to-mole ratios to find the moles of each element. Start with the CO_{2} molecule: 1.811 g of CO_{2}\cdot \frac{1 mole}{40.01 g}= 0.04526 moles of CO_{2} Now calculate moles of Carbon and Oxygen from the moles of CO_{2} : ....
by Justin Haggard 1E
Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:54 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Equation Question
Replies: 2
Views: 230

Re: Equation Question

The in the Schrodinger's equation () is a Hamilton, which is the double derivative of the wave function.

The double derivative of a wave function gives the probability of an electron at any point (position) of the wave, which is equal to the energy of the electron ().
by Justin Haggard 1E
Sun Oct 21, 2018 1:26 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Kinetic Energy and Speed of Light Variables [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 164

Re: Kinetic Energy and Speed of Light Variables [ENDORSED]

No, they are not the same.

In the speed of light equation (), the is frequency (in s-1 or Hz)

In the kinetic energy equation, , the is velocity (in m.s-1)
by Justin Haggard 1E
Sun Oct 21, 2018 1:02 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Atomic number and orbitals [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 108

Re: Atomic number and orbitals [ENDORSED]

The reason that the orbitals appear organized on the periodic table is because orbitals correspond to number of electrons in an atom, which is proportional to the number of protons in the nucleus (which is the atomic number). As the atomic numbers increase, the number of electrons in the atom increa...
by Justin Haggard 1E
Sun Oct 21, 2018 12:40 am
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Using Joules
Replies: 2
Views: 212

Re: Using Joules

Yes, since Joules are not in SI units, it becomes hard to do dimensional analysis without the conversion. One application where you would find the conversion to be very useful would be when using the De Broglie Equation: Wavelength= \frac{h}{m\cdot v} The units would be: Wavelength = \frac{(J\cd...
by Justin Haggard 1E
Mon Oct 01, 2018 8:53 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Question E.9: Epsom Salts
Replies: 2
Views: 162

Re: Question E.9: Epsom Salts

Break it down into smaller chunks so it is less overwhelming: Magnesium is Mg 2+ Sulfate is SO 4 2- Because of their charges, they bond together into Magnesium Sulfate: MgSO 4 Heptahydrate just means that there are 7 (hepta) water molecules (hydrate), so it would be 7H 2 O So the way you would put i...
by Justin Haggard 1E
Mon Oct 01, 2018 8:37 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Post Module Assessment
Replies: 3
Views: 331

Re: Post Module Assessment

Combustion of 4 mols of C 4 H 10 (g): Step 1: Start by writing the skeletal equation, or the "bare bones." Combustion uses oxygen to create carbon dioxide and water vapor. This is the unbalanced equation: C 4 H 10 (g) + O 2 (g) --> CO 2 (g) + H 2 O(g) Step 2: Then note that the problem spe...

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