Search found 24 matches

by rikolivares
Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:21 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: pH scale
Replies: 2
Views: 59

pH scale

This part is a little confusing for me. If, basic solutions have less H3O+ than acids, and the pH log measures the amount of H3O+, then why do the larger numbers (8-14) correspond to bases?
by rikolivares
Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:18 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Ligand Binding Places
Replies: 2
Views: 83

Re: Ligand Binding Places

The textbook has a chart on page 724 in the 7th edition telling you the possible number of common ligands.
by rikolivares
Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:13 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: 7th edition 9C.3: Potassium Hexacyanidochromate (III)
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Re: 7th edition 9C.3: Potassium Hexacyanidochromate (III)

Yes, since K has a charge of 1+ it would cancel out the 3- if there was three K
by rikolivares
Thu Nov 29, 2018 12:41 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Wednesday Lecture Notes
Replies: 3
Views: 130

Re: Wednesday Lecture Notes

i wasn't able to copy everything down, and Professor Lavelle didn't have any important announcements. naming coordination compounds (greek prefix) ligand names alphabetical order then tm (transition metal) cation name (roman numeral) if there are anions, then anion name (greek prefix) hydrate [Co(NH...
by rikolivares
Thu Nov 29, 2018 12:25 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: 7th Edition 3F.1
Replies: 1
Views: 74

Re: 7th Edition 3F.1

a) Hydrogen since there's H & N atoms, dipole-dipole since there's dipole moments all around, and london forces since all molecules have london forces b) london, no dipole since the Br atoms cancel the dipole moments because of the symmetry c) london, hydrogen since theres H & O atoms, dipol...
by rikolivares
Thu Nov 29, 2018 12:14 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR Formula: Central Atom
Replies: 4
Views: 104

VSEPR Formula: Central Atom

Can you have more than one central atom for the VSEPR formula? Such as A2? If so, why is I3- not A3 or AX2 but X3 instead?
by rikolivares
Sun Nov 25, 2018 11:27 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Naming Shapes
Replies: 5
Views: 80

Naming Shapes

Hello! For the exam and tests, is it better to straight up memorize the shape names or is there easy way to derive the names from the number of lone pairs and bonds?
by rikolivares
Sun Nov 25, 2018 11:20 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: pi-bonds
Replies: 7
Views: 119

Re: pi-bonds

When there is more than a single bond.
by rikolivares
Sun Nov 25, 2018 11:18 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizability
Replies: 3
Views: 81

Re: Polarizability

I think that when ions have the same number of electrons, you go with the atom that has the largest atomic radius as the atom with the lowest polarizability.
by rikolivares
Wed Nov 07, 2018 11:17 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole-Dipole vs Induced Dipole
Replies: 5
Views: 108

Dipole-Dipole vs Induced Dipole

Hello, I was wondering what the difference between a "dipole-dipole" versus "dipole induced dipole" interaction was. Thank you!
by rikolivares
Wed Nov 07, 2018 11:13 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Wednesday 11/07/2018 lecture notes
Replies: 1
Views: 51

Re: Wednesday 11/07/2018 lecture notes

these are some of the notes i took down! from last chapter strengths & lengths of bonds weak (longer) bonds easily broken & more likely involved in reaction strong (shorter) bonds, harder to break & less reactive strength of a bond is measured by its DISSOCIATION ENERGY (ENERGY REQUIRED ...
by rikolivares
Wed Nov 07, 2018 11:06 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Electron density fluctuation
Replies: 1
Views: 32

Re: Electron density fluctuation

I'm assuming that because the fluctuation is so quick, the electrons are virtually everywhere at the same time and polarizing every atom. In other words, it does not matter if electron density only momentarily makes one side of the atom negative because those electrons will be back on that side in a...
by rikolivares
Sat Oct 27, 2018 1:54 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Ml Meaning
Replies: 3
Views: 94

Ml Meaning

I understand that n corresponds to the shell and l is the type of orbital but what does ml correspond to? Is this something we will need to know? Thank you!
by rikolivares
Sat Oct 27, 2018 1:48 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Atomic Radius
Replies: 7
Views: 164

Re: Atomic Radius

There is less electrons to share the nucleus's positive charge once one of the electrons is removed, so the remaining ones have to take on more attraction to the nucleus .
by rikolivares
Sat Oct 27, 2018 1:44 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Effective Nuclear Charge vs. the Energy of a Shell
Replies: 1
Views: 59

Re: Effective Nuclear Charge vs. the Energy of a Shell

I think they have somewhat of a proportionate relationship. The higher n is, the lower the effective energy. Of course it also depends on how filled the last shell is and how many shells in total the atom has.
by rikolivares
Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:10 pm
Forum: *Black Body Radiation
Topic: Intensity of radiation
Replies: 3
Views: 318

Re: Intensity of radiation

It's related to the quantity of electrons, not the wavelength or frequency.
by rikolivares
Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:08 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Labeling Electron Orbitals
Replies: 5
Views: 155

Labeling Electron Orbitals

On Friday we went over the different labels to specify an electron (shell, subshell, max electrons, orientation, etc.) but I still cannot understand how you derive all of them, especially the orientation/spin. How can you tell what shell an electron is in or what spin it has? Thank you!
by rikolivares
Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:01 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Oxygen
Replies: 1
Views: 55

Re: Oxygen

The right side of the Periodic table doesn't have fixed signs on the charges of the elements, it's a case by case basis.
by rikolivares
Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:22 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Rydberg's Equation (hydrogen)
Replies: 2
Views: 65

Re: Rydberg's Equation (hydrogen)

En = - hR/n^2 is a simplified version that measures the lost energy of an electron. If you're trying to calculate the energy loss of a level, you need to know the frequency and level to solve it.
by rikolivares
Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:17 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: φ
Replies: 1
Views: 40

Re: φ

I don't think we need to go over the symbol phi for this class. It has to do with organic chemistry and I believe it represents a group of atoms.
by rikolivares
Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:13 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Explaining Millikan's Experiment
Replies: 2
Views: 91

Re: Explaining Millikan's Experiment

I believe he just choose that number because it was convenient. E is just a unit like moles that helps measure electric charge.
by rikolivares
Thu Oct 04, 2018 12:05 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Homework Question Edition 6 E1
Replies: 4
Views: 130

Re: Homework Question Edition 6 E1

I assume it was just to underscore the large number, but I don't think there would be any problem if you answered in meters in a question like this for a quiz or test. I think meters is always the safest bet.
by rikolivares
Thu Oct 04, 2018 11:55 am
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Fundamentals 7th Edition M1
Replies: 2
Views: 97

Fundamentals 7th Edition M1

The problem asks Hydrazine, N 2 H 4, is an oily liquid used as a rocket fuel. It can be prepared in water by oxidizing ammonia with hypochlorite ions: 2 NH3(g) + ClO (aq) = N2H4(aq) + Cl (aq) + H2O(l). When 35.0 g of ammonia reacted with an excess of hypochlorite ion, 25.2 g of hydrazine was produce...
by rikolivares
Thu Oct 04, 2018 11:43 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Problem F.7
Replies: 4
Views: 107

Re: HW Problem F.7

For a, you would first need to find the molar mass of two oxygen atoms. It is given that the metal M is 88.8% of the compound, so O2 must be the rest. I think next you can divide percentage of O2 (as a decimal, e.g. 20% would be .20) by its own molar mass, and finally multiply the number by 100 to f...

Go to advanced search