Search found 60 matches

by 105114680
Thu Mar 14, 2019 6:10 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Reaction Profiles
Replies: 1
Views: 41

Reaction Profiles

Can someone please explain how to interpret a reaction profile graph for reactions with multi-step mechanisms? How can you determine which step of a mechanism is the fastest from the graph? Why do the dips represent the formation of intermediates? Why do the number of peaks represent the number of s...
by 105114680
Thu Mar 14, 2019 5:58 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Initiating, Propagating, Terminating [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 51

Initiating, Propagating, Terminating [ENDORSED]

Problem 7.29 in the seventh edition textbook asks us to determine whether the two steps in a suggested mechanism for the destruction of ozone by chlorofluorocarbons are initiating, propagating, or terminating. It also asks to write a chain terminating step for the reaction. What do the 3 terms mean ...
by 105114680
Thu Mar 14, 2019 5:53 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Linear Plots
Replies: 1
Views: 60

Linear Plots

In the seventh edition textbook, problem 7.21 lists a number of plots and asks us to determine which are linear (for example, [A] vs t for a 0th order reaction in A is linear). The solutions manual states that the option (f). initial rate against [A] for a reaction that is first order in A, is linea...
by 105114680
Sun Mar 10, 2019 6:55 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: first order reactions examples
Replies: 3
Views: 57

Re: first order reactions examples

Radioactive decay is a first-order reaction since the decay rate is proportional to the initial amount of radioactive atoms present to the first power. They are proportional through a decay constant. Hope this was helpful!
by 105114680
Sun Mar 10, 2019 6:23 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: 7th edition 7A. 17
Replies: 3
Views: 197

Re: 7th edition 7A. 17

The solutions manual's answer is in terms of moles instead of mmol (1 mmol = 1x10^-3 mol). They converted all the units from mmol to mol before solving for the units of k. Since the whole problem is in terms of mmol, I think you are okay leaving the answer in terms of mmol as well.
by 105114680
Sun Mar 10, 2019 6:19 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: 7A.15
Replies: 2
Views: 56

Re: 7A.15

You do not consider C because when [A] and [B] are constant and [C] changes, the rate does not change. Thus you can conclude that the reactant C is zero order and the rate of the reaction is independent of [C] (and it does not show up in the rate law). Hope this helped!
by 105114680
Sun Mar 03, 2019 6:07 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Kinetics
Replies: 7
Views: 120

Re: Kinetics

In a concentration vs time graph of a reaction, the slope or derivative at a certain time is the rate of the reaction (how fast or slow a reaction proceeds), and kinetics is the study of the rates of chemical reactions. Initial rates of reactions can be calculated but it becomes more difficult the f...
by 105114680
Sun Mar 03, 2019 6:02 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Q
Replies: 3
Views: 71

Q

When using Q in the Nernst Equation, how come we are allowed to mix values for partial pressure and concentration of the products and reactants?
by 105114680
Sun Mar 03, 2019 5:58 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: K Value
Replies: 7
Views: 148

K Value

Why is it that anytime the Nernst equation is used to solve for K, K is written with only one significant figure (for example: K = 1x103)?
by 105114680
Sun Feb 24, 2019 8:18 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: equilibruim based on enthalpy
Replies: 3
Views: 80

Re: equilibruim based on enthalpy

If the change in enthalpy is positive the reaction is endothermic (it requires heat to form products) and so raising the temperature will cause the equilibrium to shift toward the right (i.e., more product will be formed since more heat is available). If the change in enthalpy is negative the reacti...
by 105114680
Sun Feb 24, 2019 8:11 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: SHE
Replies: 3
Views: 63

SHE

What is the standard hydrogen electrode? I thought electrodes were made of metal to conduct electricity, so what does it mean for the electrode to be hydrogen?
by 105114680
Sun Feb 24, 2019 8:08 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Current, Charge, Potential, Volt
Replies: 1
Views: 29

Current, Charge, Potential, Volt

Can someone please explain the difference between current, charge, volt, and potential? I am having a hard time understanding what they all mean.
by 105114680
Thu Feb 14, 2019 3:31 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Stability
Replies: 3
Views: 74

Stability

I need help thinking through how a raise in temperature affects the stability of compounds with respect to their elements. I know you can use the G f and H f of the compound to solve for the -TdeltaS f term in the gibbs free energy equation, and that if T increases than the whole -TdeltaS f term inc...
by 105114680
Thu Feb 14, 2019 3:15 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: gibbs free energy
Replies: 10
Views: 150

Re: gibbs free energy

If it is negative, the reaction is spontaneous.
by 105114680
Thu Feb 14, 2019 3:10 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: 6th ed 8.101
Replies: 1
Views: 72

Re: 6th ed 8.101

Since you have a reaction you can use the enthalpies of formation of the products and reactants to find the reaction enthalpy. Look up the enthalpies of formation for both SO3 and SO2 and then multiply them by their molar coefficients from the reaction. Then subtract the enthalpy of formation for SO...
by 105114680
Thu Feb 07, 2019 4:40 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Enthalpy and Entropy
Replies: 2
Views: 80

Re: Enthalpy and Entropy

Enthalpy is heat released or absorbed in chemical reactions and physical changes. Entropy, on the other hand, is needed to describe the likelihood of a system being in a particular state. The textbook refers to entropy as a measure of disorder within a system, although Dr. Lavelle has decided to avo...
by 105114680
Thu Feb 07, 2019 4:15 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Change in Internal Energy
Replies: 1
Views: 63

Re: Change in Internal Energy

The reference point affects the sign of q: q (cal) = -q. The experiments were conducted in the calorimeter so the heat capacity of the calorimeter must be calculated (which is calculated from the first reaction that was used to calibrate the calorimeter). The equation for this is C (cal&...
by 105114680
Thu Feb 07, 2019 4:03 pm
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: Statistical vs Residual Entropy
Replies: 4
Views: 88

Statistical vs Residual Entropy

Can someone explain statistical entropy and how it differs from residual entropy? Dr. Lavelle's lecture slides indicated that statistical entropy had a large error in W. What does that mean in this context?
by 105114680
Sun Feb 03, 2019 5:09 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Work by expansion
Replies: 3
Views: 72

Work by expansion

The work by expansion equation gives an answer in the units atm * L not J or kJ (the unit used for work). How do you convert atm * L to J?
by 105114680
Sun Feb 03, 2019 5:01 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Reversible reaction
Replies: 1
Views: 40

Reversible reaction

In class, Dr. Lavelle talked about the small fluctuations in volume that occur when a system is at equilibrium, and how the sum of these infinitesimal changes contribute to reversible reactions doing more work than irreversible reactions. However, how do these infinitesimal changes in volume occur i...
by 105114680
Sun Feb 03, 2019 4:51 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Heating and Cooling Curve
Replies: 2
Views: 59

Re: Heating and Cooling Curve

Yes, the cooling curve is the heating curve but in the opposite direction (going from right to left). Temperature is on the y-axis, so reading a heating curve from right to left shows a decrease in temperature which shows the cooling process. Hope this helped!
by 105114680
Sun Feb 03, 2019 4:51 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Heating and Cooling Curve
Replies: 2
Views: 59

Re: Heating and Cooling Curve

Yes, the cooling curve is the heating curve but in the opposite direction (going from right to left). Temperature is on the y-axis, so reading a heating curve from right to left shows a decrease in temperature which shows the cooling process. Hope this helped!
by 105114680
Sun Jan 27, 2019 12:45 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: State Property
Replies: 3
Views: 62

State Property

Can someone please explain what it means for a state property to be independent of the path taken to obtain that state? I understand state properties are only concerned with the current state of a substance, but what does the "path taken" refer to? Would that have to do with heating, cooli...
by 105114680
Sun Jan 27, 2019 12:39 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Relationship between heat and work
Replies: 2
Views: 60

Re: Relationship between heat and work

Heat and work are two ways in which energy can be transferred. The more energy a system has, the greater is capacity to do work and the more heat it can produce. Hope this was helpful!
by 105114680
Sun Jan 27, 2019 12:34 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: closed vs isolated system
Replies: 3
Views: 58

Re: closed vs isolated system

A closed system has a fixed amount of matter and can exchange energy with its surroundings. An example would be a cold pack that it used for athletic injuries since it absorbs heat from its surroundings to become cold. An isolated system can exchange neither matter nor energy with its surroundings a...
by 105114680
Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:02 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: reaction of AlCl3
Replies: 1
Views: 30

reaction of AlCl3

Hi. The problem 6D.15 part (b) asks to calculate the pH of 0.055M AlCl3. I was confused on how to set up a reaction since hydrogen isn't a part of AlCl3. The solutions manual sets up the following reaction: Al(H2O)6^+3(aq) + H2O(l) <---> H3O^+3(aq) + Al(H2O)5^+2(aq). I understand why the AlCl3 had t...
by 105114680
Sun Jan 20, 2019 11:51 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 6C.7 7th Edition
Replies: 1
Views: 31

Re: 6C.7 7th Edition

Use the formula Ka*Kb = Kw to convert all to Ka values. Then compare the values: the smaller the value, the weaker the acid. Hope this helped!
by 105114680
Sun Jan 20, 2019 11:48 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5I.27 in 7th edition
Replies: 1
Views: 46

Re: 5I.27 in 7th edition

I also ran into the same problem. However, using the value 0.07379 from my calculation, the equilibrium concentrations come out the same as those in the solutions manual. The discrepancy is taken care of by rounding and sig figs.
by 105114680
Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:53 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE table calculation
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Re: ICE table calculation

Pure solids and liquids are not included when doing an ICE table calculation. Their concentrations do not change, and if they do, the change is so minimally it is insignificant anyway. Hope this was helpful!
by 105114680
Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:43 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Solving for x in ICE table
Replies: 2
Views: 46

Re: Solving for x in ICE table

Multiply the right hand of the equation out. Doing so gives you 2x=3.60x10^-4 - 3.16x10^-3x (multiply 3.16x10^-3 in the first parenthesis with both terms in the second parenthesis). To solve for x add the 3.16x10^-3x from the right hand side of the equation to the 2x on the left. This gives you 2.00...
by 105114680
Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:33 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: "quick" way to solve changes in pressure
Replies: 3
Views: 64

Re: "quick" way to solve changes in pressure

Concentration is equal to moles/liters. By decreasing the volume by compression (decreasing liters), the concentration of the substances is increased (since the amount of moles are initially constant before the equilibrium adjusts). To adjust, the equilibrium will shift in the direction of the least...
by 105114680
Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:08 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: writing formulas
Replies: 2
Views: 29

writing formulas

Can someone please explain why water is sometimes written after the ligand in a formula (in alphabetical order) and sometimes before (not in alphabetical order)? For example, in the 7th edition textbook in section 9C, problem 3 asks you to write the formula of the coordination compound given the nam...
by 105114680
Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:02 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Dilution
Replies: 1
Views: 38

Dilution

Many homework problems ask you to determine the pH of a solution before and after it was diluted to fill a larger volume. Can someone please explain why you must multiply [H30+] by (initial volume/volume after dilution)?
by 105114680
Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:54 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Negative pH
Replies: 1
Views: 66

Negative pH

In the seventh edition textbook, problem 9 in section 6B asks you to determine [H30+], [OH-], pH, and pOH given just one of these things. For one of the problems the [H30+] given is 1.5 mol/L and thus the pH = -log(1.5) = -0.18. The solutions manual uses this value for pH but disregards the negative...
by 105114680
Tue Nov 27, 2018 4:26 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma vs. Pi
Replies: 11
Views: 485

Re: Sigma vs. Pi

A single bond is made up of one sigma bond. A double bond is made up of one sigma bond and one pi bond. A triple bond is made up of one sigma bond and two pi bonds. All bonds will have at least one sigma bond and then depending on whether it is a single, double, or triple bond it will have either no...
by 105114680
Tue Nov 27, 2018 4:23 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Comparing Bond Lengths of Diff Molecules/Ions
Replies: 1
Views: 90

Re: Comparing Bond Lengths of Diff Molecules/Ions

The bond lengths in SO3^2- are not the same. The most stable structure has one double bond and 2 single bonds. However, SO3^2- has resonance and thus the actual SO bond length in this molecule is not determined by any one individual bond but rather a blend of all 3. Thus the SO bond length in SO3^2-...
by 105114680
Tue Nov 27, 2018 4:12 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Homework help: Polar vs Nonpolar
Replies: 1
Views: 24

Re: Homework help: Polar vs Nonpolar

The solutions manual correctly states that b is non-polar and that d is polar. Try taking another look!
by 105114680
Mon Nov 19, 2018 5:17 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Molecular Shape & Hybridization
Replies: 4
Views: 87

Re: Molecular Shape & Hybridization

The number of hybridized orbitals of any one atom is the same as the number of regions of electron density around the atom. This regions of electron density give us the electron arrangement which is different than the molecular shape (molecular shape does not take lone pairs into consideration). Thu...
by 105114680
Mon Nov 19, 2018 4:51 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Problem 4.33
Replies: 1
Views: 28

Re: Problem 4.33

To solve problems such as this one, draw the lewis structure of the compounds and then from there you can deduce how many regions of electron density surround the atom in boldface. The total number of regions of electron density will be the hybridization of the atom. For example if there are 5 regio...
by 105114680
Mon Nov 19, 2018 4:47 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Labeling Compounds
Replies: 4
Views: 82

Re: Labeling Compounds

There is an understood 1 after the s in the sp3 hybridization of methane (s1p3). Methane has four regions of electron density and uses 1 s-orbital and 3 p-orbitals, making a total of 4 hybridized orbitals. Thus, compounds or molecules with 4 regions of electron density (such as methane) have an sp3 ...
by 105114680
Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:40 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angles
Replies: 3
Views: 41

Re: Bond Angles

Molecules that have lone pair electrons on the central atom will have bond angles that are slightly less than the value they would be if the lone pair were a bonded atom. The reason for this is that repulsion of a lone pair of electrons is greater than the repulsion of a bonding pair, thus the lone ...
by 105114680
Wed Nov 14, 2018 7:22 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Radicals
Replies: 1
Views: 35

Radicals

Does a single electron on a radical count as an area of electron density as much as an electron pair counts? Is the repulsion less for a single electron than for a pair, and does this mean that the bond angles of a molecule with a single electron will be slightly larger than the bond angles of a mol...
by 105114680
Wed Nov 14, 2018 7:14 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: polarizing power
Replies: 2
Views: 96

Re: polarizing power

Anions do have polarizing power. The trend is that that larger, less electronegative anions will have a greater polarizing power. For cations the trend is that smaller, more highly charged cations have more polarizing power. Hope this helps!
by 105114680
Thu Nov 08, 2018 5:41 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Permanent Dipole Moments
Replies: 4
Views: 255

Re: Permanent Dipole Moments

Permanent Dipole Moments occur when the difference in the electronegativity of two atoms in a molecule is large. The more electronegative atom will attract more electrons, thus creating a partial negative charge around that atom and a partial positive charge around the atom with the lower electroneg...
by 105114680
Thu Nov 08, 2018 1:36 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Mystery Element
Replies: 4
Views: 142

Re: Mystery Element

The center atom will be the atom with the lowest ionization energy. Ionization energy increases as you go across from left to right on the periodic table and decreases as you go down a group. Hope this was helpful!
by 105114680
Thu Nov 08, 2018 1:33 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Electronegativity
Replies: 6
Views: 126

Re: Electronegativity

Chlorine is more electronegative because it has more protons and thus exerts a stronger pull for electrons (the effective nuclear charge is greater than that of Oxygen). Additionally, Chlorine is only one electron away from completing its octet while Oxygen needs two electron to complete its octet, ...
by 105114680
Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:44 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Problem 1A #15 (7th edition book)
Replies: 1
Views: 217

Re: Problem 1A #15 (7th edition book)

The value .112 is equal to 1/n2^2. By rearranging the formula: frequency (v) = R(1/n1^1 - 1/n2^2) we get 1/n2^2 = 1/n1^1 - v/R. Thus, 1/n1^1 - v/R = .112 which is what you solved for. You can write 1/n2^2 = .112 and so 1/.112 =n2^2. 1/.112 is approximately 9 so we can say n2^2 = 9 and thus n2 = 3. H...
by 105114680
Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:31 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Test 2 question
Replies: 1
Views: 96

Re: Test 2 question

Oxygen is diatomic so the O2 molecule has a molar mass of 32.00g/mol (twice the amount of O which is 16.00g). Since the problem refers to 1 molecule of Oxygen (not a mole of Oxygen), then you need to figure out the weight of 1 molecule of Oxygen. To do this you can use dimensional analysis: 32.00 g ...
by 105114680
Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:16 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Formal Charge
Replies: 2
Views: 64

Formal Charge

Problem 5 a) on chapter 2C 7th edition: the problem calls for you to draw the lewis structure for ClO. The solutions manual shows it drawn with a single bond, but I was wondering why it would be incorrect to draw the structure with a double bond instead (since the formal charge would then be 0 for b...
by 105114680
Wed Oct 24, 2018 11:07 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Electron Configurations
Replies: 3
Views: 74

Re: Electron Configurations

The shell n=3 is lower in energy than the shell n=4 and thus it is written first to get the lowest energy configuration. The shells in the configuration should be in order of numerical value (which makes sense because it is in order of increasing energy). Since the d-block is included after Argon, a...
by 105114680
Tue Oct 23, 2018 8:31 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configurations
Replies: 2
Views: 51

Electron Configurations

In class, Dr. Lavelle mentioned that Copper and Chromium are strange exceptions and they fill up (or half fill up) their d-subshell before the s-subshell because that is the configuration with the lowest energy. I was wondering if this also applies to Ag and Mo as well? Thank you!
by 105114680
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:09 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configurations
Replies: 2
Views: 82

Electron Configurations

I am trying to do the electron configuration for W. Since W is in a row that breaks into the f block I was wondering where I would write the f-electrons. Would they come before or after the d-electrons in an electron configuration? So far I have it written as: [Xe]6s2 5d4 4f14 Is this correct? If no...
by 105114680
Wed Oct 17, 2018 10:27 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Bohr Formula
Replies: 4
Views: 122

Re: Bohr Formula

Use the formula when you are asked to calculate an electron's change in energy when it transitions from different energy levels (e.g. n=4 to n=2). You can also use the change in energy to calculate the frequency and wavelength of the light emitted due to the loss of energy when an electron transitio...
by 105114680
Wed Oct 17, 2018 7:52 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Nodes
Replies: 1
Views: 26

Nodes

Hi. I have a pretty clear understanding of what nodal planes are but I am confused as to what nodes are. Are they the same as nodal planes or are as lobes, or are they something completely different?
by 105114680
Thu Oct 11, 2018 6:13 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: HW Question 1.27 (6th edition)
Replies: 1
Views: 49

Re: HW Question 1.27 (6th edition)

The question states that the lamp is rated 32W meaning 32J of energy are emitted every second. In 2 seconds 64 J of energy would be emitted by the lamp. Solve for the frequency using the speed of light and lambda and then use the frequency in the formula E=hv to calculate the energy per photon. Sinc...
by 105114680
Thu Oct 11, 2018 6:06 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Uncertainty in Kinetic energy of electron [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 122

Uncertainty in Kinetic energy of electron [ENDORSED]

I am very confused as to what is meant when a problem asks you to find the uncertainty in the kinetic energy of an electron. I have solved for the uncertainty in velocity using the Heisenberg equation and the question is asking me to use it to find the uncertainty in the kinetic energy of the electr...
by 105114680
Wed Oct 10, 2018 5:01 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Wavefunction
Replies: 3
Views: 126

Wavefunction

I know that wavefunctions describe the distribution of an electron in an atom but I am having trouble understanding that concept. For one, why is it called a wavefunction and does it have anything to do with an atom's energy levels?
by 105114680
Thu Oct 04, 2018 1:49 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Polyatomic ions
Replies: 3
Views: 70

Re: Polyatomic ions

From my understanding, polyatomic ions are just one of those things you have to memorize. Once you use them enough you will become very familiar with them. I would suggest memorizing them as you come across them, and the more you are asked to use them in problems the easier they will become. Also, p...
by 105114680
Thu Oct 04, 2018 1:41 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: F5 (6TH EDITION)
Replies: 5
Views: 152

Re: F5 (6TH EDITION)

You would need to find the mass composition of each element and then convert those to percentages based on the entire mass of the compound. For example, the mass of C in the compound is 84.077g. To find the mass percent composition of C in the compound divide the mass of C in the compound by the tot...
by 105114680
Thu Oct 04, 2018 1:31 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Grams to atom Conversions [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 67

Grams to atom Conversions [ENDORSED]

I know that to determine the amount of formula units in a compound, but I am having a hard time understanding the difference between molecules or atoms and formula units. How would you know when to use which terminology?

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