Search found 24 matches

by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 29, 2018 10:45 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone pairs
Replies: 3
Views: 104

Re: Lone pairs

Its because in the other atoms, there are protons that act as a sort of buffer tht lessens the effects of the charges, but there are no protons in a lone pair.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 29, 2018 10:43 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Charges
Replies: 4
Views: 80

Re: Charges

You just have to memorize the charges for most common ligands. then take the charge of the ligands and subtract the total chrge of the ligands to find the charge of the central atom.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 29, 2018 10:35 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: CH2O hybridization
Replies: 9
Views: 2540

Re: CH2O hybridization

Count the number of lone pairs and add them to number of sigma bonds to find that number. then add on an orbital for each number
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 29, 2018 10:32 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 6th edition 4.23
Replies: 3
Views: 86

Re: 6th edition 4.23

There is a double bond for both the oxygen atoms in B, but only one has a double bond in letter C because an O atom with a single bond and 3 lone pairs has a formal charge of -1 and the overall molecule has a negetive 1 charge.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 29, 2018 10:29 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Dipole moment
Replies: 7
Views: 160

Re: Dipole moment

As a general idea, the further the two elements are on the periodic table, the greater the difference in electronegetivity and therefore the greater the difference in the dipole moment.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:47 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angle of Sulfite Ion
Replies: 2
Views: 76

Re: Bond Angle of Sulfite Ion

When there is a lone pair of electrons, they have a greater repulsion against the two atoms, so the two Oxygen atoms will be closer together because the lone pair is pushing them closer.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 15, 2018 3:21 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR forms
Replies: 3
Views: 62

Re: VSEPR forms

When there are are no lone pairs, the VSEPR model allows for each atoms electrons to be exactly as far away from each other as possible. When lone pairs are present, they repel the atoms more than another atom, so it has the effect of shrinking the angles between the atoms.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:52 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: number of different molecular shapes
Replies: 3
Views: 69

Re: number of different molecular shapes

So far in lecture, we've cover linear, Trigonal planer, tetrahedral, Trigonal Bipyramidal, Octahedral, and trigonal Pyramidal. One key to remember is that although lone pairs of electrons change the shape, you do not look at them when naming the shape created.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 08, 2018 2:09 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Finding all Resonance Structures
Replies: 4
Views: 119

Re: Finding all Resonance Structures

I would say the only "trick" is seeing if there are different places where the same bond could possibly be placed without the formal charge being changed at all, but this really isn't a trick.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 08, 2018 2:03 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Chemical Bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 116

Re: Chemical Bonds

Covenant bonds would be the longer of these two bonds because the shorter the bond length, the stronger the bond. Therefore because ionic bonds are stronger, they are shorter.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 08, 2018 1:57 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octet
Replies: 6
Views: 154

Re: Octet

I wouldn't think of the Octet rule as a rule but as more of a suggestion because it doesn't apply to the subshells after 3s
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:28 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: octet rule
Replies: 11
Views: 215

Re: octet rule

Its honestly just a "rule" because the most abundant atoms on earth generally follow the octet rule. (N, C, O)
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:25 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge
Replies: 8
Views: 169

Re: Formal Charge

To find "s" write the Lewis dot structure and then count the number of bonds that they form. however, don't forget to divide it by two in the equation.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:16 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: 6th Edition 3.21
Replies: 2
Views: 54

6th Edition 3.21

For the Calcium+2 ion, would you have to write out the entire ground state configuration, or would you just be able to write [Ar].
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:16 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: 6th Edition 3.21
Replies: 2
Views: 68

6th Edition 3.21

For the Calcium+2 ion, would you have to write out the entire ground state configuration, or would you just be able to write [Ar].
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Oct 25, 2018 11:31 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Units of De Broglie's Equation
Replies: 4
Views: 160

Re: Units of De Broglie's Equation

Thanks Guys
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Oct 25, 2018 10:20 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Units of De Broglie's Equation
Replies: 4
Views: 160

Units of De Broglie's Equation

I understand that the SI unit for wavelength is meters, but when doing the calculation, how do you cancel the other units to get meters.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Oct 25, 2018 10:17 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: De Broglie
Replies: 12
Views: 514

Re: De Broglie

Yeah,
if it gives you the speed of a subatomic particle, you can then use that to find the momentum by using the sheet of constants to find the mass of the particle. You generally use it when they ask for the wavelengthand give you speed or momentum.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Oct 18, 2018 11:08 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: De Broglie
Replies: 12
Views: 514

Re: De Broglie

On the homework problems, it some times gives you the velocity of a subatomic particle and you have to use the unit sheet (or google) in order to find the momentum (p) so that you can then move forward use De Broglie's equation.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Oct 18, 2018 3:24 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: De Broglie
Replies: 2
Views: 107

Re: De Broglie

For that problem, do not use De Broglie's equation. Just use the equation Ep=hc/lamda because you are given the wavelength and not the momentum. Using this will the right answer and correct units.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Oct 18, 2018 12:56 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: problem 1.25
Replies: 2
Views: 104

Re: problem 1.25

Given that they give you the wavelength the Ep=hc/(wavelength) equation works here. Using this equation gives you the answer that's in the back of the book. Why they say to use the equation with a frequency, I don't know but just stick with using the wavelength. Also, don't forget to change the nano...
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Oct 04, 2018 9:06 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Limiting Reactants
Replies: 6
Views: 104

Re: Limiting Reactants

If you were to do the whole problem as many time as the amount of reactants, each assuming a different reactant to be the limiting reactant, the answer that produces the least product is the limiting reactant.
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:54 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Mole-to-mole predictions [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 129

Re: Mole-to-mole predictions [ENDORSED]

Yeah, and if it isn't perfect to the formula you use the ratio that is found in the formula and then adjust it up or down depending on the limiting reactant. Ex. You have a limiting reactant of 3 moles of A and the formula is 2A+B -- C+D you multiply 2 by 1.5 to get the 3 mole s and then multiply th...
by Jack Mitchell 3J
Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:19 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: QUESTION G15
Replies: 1
Views: 42

QUESTION G15

For G15, how can you get the volume of a diluted solution if you are never given the initial volume or final volume?

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