Search found 30 matches

by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:36 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Inter and Intramolecular Forces
Replies: 3
Views: 118

Inter and Intramolecular Forces

What is the difference between intra and inter molecular forces?
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:17 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong Acids [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 72

Re: Strong Acids [ENDORSED]

The short list would include these 7 strong acids:
HCL
HBr
HI
HNO3
HCLO4
HCLO3
H2SO4
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Dec 02, 2018 12:12 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: lone pairs
Replies: 20
Views: 264

Re: lone pairs

One example of this would be the the molecule H^2O. The central atom, oxygen has two bonds ( one with each hydrogen ) and two sets of lones pairs. Therefore the hybridization of oxygen would sp^3.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Dec 02, 2018 12:09 am
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Lone Pairs
Replies: 4
Views: 211

Re: Lone Pairs

One example of a specific lone pair placement would be that in a molecule with square pyramidal geometry, the lone pair would be on the axial plane rather than the equatorial plane.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Dec 02, 2018 12:04 am
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: pi and sigma bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 177

Re: pi and sigma bonds

Pi bonds are essentially parallel bonds, so movement from the plane is difficult. However, it is important to note that there can be a strained double bonds that are slightly twisted
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:10 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Sigma vs pi bonds
Replies: 7
Views: 104

Re: Sigma vs pi bonds

Also, sigma bonds are generally more stable than pi bonds due to the fact that there is greater orbital overlap in sigma bonds
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:07 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent/Angular Shape
Replies: 4
Views: 101

Re: Bent/Angular Shape

A bent molecule can also refer to a molecule with two bonds and one lone pair or a molecule with two bonds and two lone pairs.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Nov 25, 2018 12:19 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structures
Replies: 2
Views: 68

Re: Lewis Structures

Place all the nitrogen atoms in a straight line and then find the best structure using formal charges.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Nov 18, 2018 8:00 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 7th edition 2E.13
Replies: 3
Views: 65

Re: 7th edition 2E.13

The drawing depicts a 180-degree bond angle both horizontally and vertically, so the orientation does not matter.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:57 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecules with more than 2 different elements
Replies: 3
Views: 65

Re: Molecules with more than 2 different elements

An atom with the same element would not be polar because there would be no difference in electronegativity.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:55 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: lone pairs and bond angle
Replies: 6
Views: 86

Re: lone pairs and bond angle

For example, a molecule with 4 bonds has a bond angle of 109.5 degrees while a molecule with 3 bonds and one lone pair has a bond angle of less than a 109.5 degress
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Nov 11, 2018 10:05 pm
Forum: Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Topic: Question 3.87 (Sixth Edition)
Replies: 1
Views: 173

Re: Question 3.87 (Sixth Edition)

To solve this problem it is important to look at the atomic radius.The shorter the atomic radius, the stronger the bond. This is because shorter bonds mean stronger bonds.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Nov 11, 2018 9:59 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Differentiating between Covalent and Ionic
Replies: 3
Views: 64

Re: Differentiating between Covalent and Ionic

Ionic bonds involve donating an electron while in covalent bonds electrons are shared
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sat Nov 10, 2018 6:16 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: How many forces can bonds have?
Replies: 2
Views: 58

Re: How many forces can bonds have?

It is also important to note that dispersion, london, van der vals, and dipole induced dipole are all different names that refer to the same force.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:41 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron Affinity???
Replies: 3
Views: 126

Re: Electron Affinity???

This question is an exception to the general rule and the fact that sulfur has a higher electron affinity than oxygen was found through experimentation.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:38 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron affinity homework 1F.11
Replies: 2
Views: 137

Re: Electron affinity homework 1F.11

In addition to the general trend of electron affinity being higher on the right, electron affinity generally decreases down a group
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:28 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron Affinity
Replies: 5
Views: 92

Re: Electron Affinity

The overall trend for electron affinity is that it increases across a period and decreases down a group
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Oct 28, 2018 10:14 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Topic 1F.11c electron affinity
Replies: 2
Views: 63

Re: Topic 1F.11c electron affinity

With regards to the oxygen and sulfur question, if you look at it "normally" along the trend line it makes sense that oxygen has a higher electron affinity. However, as mentioned in the original question, electron affinity is not perfect. Experimental findings show that sulfur has a higher...
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Oct 28, 2018 10:05 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron configuration exceptions
Replies: 3
Views: 82

Re: Electron configuration exceptions

An example of this irregularity would be that that the electron configuration of Copper(Cu) would be [Ar]3d^10, 4s^1. Instead of having 9 electrons in the d subshell, the elements would be at a lower potential energy with 10 electrons, taking one away from the s subshell.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Oct 28, 2018 10:00 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Diagonal Relationship
Replies: 3
Views: 82

Re: Diagonal Relationship

I'm assuming that you mean the diagonal relationship of electronegativity? What that means is that electronegativity increases as you move from left to right across a period and decreases as you move down a group. These average of those two trends lead to a diagonal trend line across the periodic ta...
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:27 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Slight Confusion
Replies: 3
Views: 76

Re: Slight Confusion

For the d orbritasl, the five configurations are dxy, dxz, dyz, dx^2y^2, and dz^2
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:21 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Effective Nuclear Charge
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Re: Effective Nuclear Charge

It is also important to note that effective nuclear charge tends to increase as you move from left to right on the periodic table.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:18 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Effective Nuclear Charge
Replies: 3
Views: 64

Re: Effective Nuclear Charge

The Z-eff tends to increase as one moves from left to right on the periodic table
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sat Oct 13, 2018 11:12 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Module Photoelectric Effect
Replies: 2
Views: 89

Re: Module Photoelectric Effect

The energy required to remove an electron is essentially the work function converted to joules/atoms. To do that you first need to multiply a 150.6 kg times a 1000 to get a 150.6 x 10^3 J/mol. Then you have to divide by Avogadro's constant to convert the moles to atoms, thereby getting an answer of ...
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sat Oct 13, 2018 11:02 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Module Question 30 (Part C)
Replies: 1
Views: 43

Re: Module Question 30 (Part C)

From parts A and B of this problem we find out that the kinetic energy is 1.99 x 10^-19 J and the work is 2.5 x 10^-19 J. If we add the kinetic energy and work together we get the energy of the photon, which is 4.49 x 10^-19. Energy of the photon = plank's constant x frequency When we plug in the en...
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Sat Oct 13, 2018 10:53 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Module Question 29 (Part B)
Replies: 4
Views: 107

Re: Module Question 29 (Part B)

The energy needed to remove an electron from one sodium atom is simply the work function converted to the right units(J/atom)
You would have to multiply 150.6 kg/mol by 1000 to get 150.6*10^3 J/mol. Then you would divide that number by Avagadro's constant to get the answer 2.5*10^-19 J/atom.
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Thu Oct 04, 2018 6:15 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: How to write empirical/ molecular formulas
Replies: 3
Views: 81

Re: How to write empirical/ molecular formulas

Additionally when you write the formula for a compound with a metal and nonmental, you typically list the metal before the nonmental in the formula
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Thu Oct 04, 2018 2:05 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: L.37 part B
Replies: 1
Views: 42

L.37 part B

For 100 ml of the diluted solution, what would the molarity be?
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
Thu Oct 04, 2018 1:56 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: L.35
Replies: 1
Views: 62

L.35

The solution's manual states that the conversion from tons to kilograms is 1-ton equals a 100 kilograms. However, when I searched it up, Google states that 1 ton is about 907 kilograms. Is it okay to use either conversion?

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