Search found 29 matches

by Carlos Gomez 3H
Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:26 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Chloro v/s chlorido
Replies: 6
Views: 135

Re: Chloro v/s chlorido

In a similar case, I believe the use of both amine and ammine will be accepted as well. One is just newer.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:23 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Bis, Tris, Tetrakis, etc.
Replies: 3
Views: 102

Re: Bis, Tris, Tetrakis, etc.

Using the Greek prefixes bis-, tris-, tetrakis-, etc. if the ligand already contains a Greek prefix simply means that if the ligand already contains the prefixes di-, tri-, tetra- or hexa- in its name then you should use the other set of prefixes (bis-, tris-, tetrakis-, etc.) to distinguish the coo...
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:16 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: mono- prefix
Replies: 2
Views: 68

Re: mono- prefix

I thought that the prefix mono- was only used when naming what type of dentate the ligand is, such as monodentate, bidentate, or tridentate.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:10 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Oxidation Number
Replies: 2
Views: 57

Re: Oxidation Number

When naming coordination compounds, the oxidation number is found by finding the charge of each ligand and the overall charge of the compound (seen outside of the brackets). You need to simply add up each charge and determine what oxidation number of the transition metal would satisfy the overall ch...
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:05 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming (churro)
Replies: 3
Views: 95

Re: Naming (churro)

I think chlorine can be labeled as both chloro and chlorido (as it is in the textbook). My TA used chloro and he said he did not think it mattered. Chlorido is just a new form used. Ethylenediamine is labeled "bis" because it already has the suffix of di- in its name, so bis is used to dis...
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Tue Dec 04, 2018 1:14 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Water and Bronsted Acids/Bases
Replies: 2
Views: 62

Re: Water and Bronsted Acids/Bases

The reason why water can act as a Bronsted acid is because it donates an H+ proton.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:59 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Difference between Lewis and Bronsted
Replies: 5
Views: 144

Re: Difference between Lewis and Bronsted

I would think it is best to know the difference between both and how to identify a chemical as a bronsted base/acid or a lewis acid/base and how they correlate with each other.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:57 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong acids and strong bases
Replies: 5
Views: 77

Re: Strong acids and strong bases

I believe the book refers to this as completely deprotonated as well.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:43 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: polydentates/ chelates
Replies: 1
Views: 73

Re: polydentates/ chelates

When looking at a chemical formula, the coordination number will tell you how many ligands are attached to the central atom. If there are more than one ligands then the chemical is a polydentate, and these vary from bidentate to hexadenate. A chelate would have a ring structure and a polydentate wou...
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:37 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: chelates
Replies: 5
Views: 121

Re: chelates

I believe chelates are ring-shaped with the metal ion in the middle surrounded by ligands in the coordination sphere.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:27 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Number
Replies: 2
Views: 80

Re: Coordination Number

I agree to draw the Lewis Structure and count how many ligands attach to the central atom and how many loan pairs are present as well.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:51 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Compounds
Replies: 2
Views: 79

Re: Coordination Compounds

I do know that coordination compunds with a square planar shape are for atoms and ions with d8 electron configurations such as Pt2+ and Au3+.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:47 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Monodentates
Replies: 2
Views: 64

Re: Monodentates

Also keep in mind that ligands must have one or more lone pairs.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:25 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentate
Replies: 3
Views: 90

Re: Polydentate

Monodentate means that there is only one binding site to the central atom, but polydentate means that there is more than one binding site to the central atom, which means it can be either bi-, tri, or hexadentate. A bidentate donates 2 electron pairs (2 sites). A tridentate donates 3 electron pairs ...
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:18 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Ligands
Replies: 2
Views: 69

Re: Ligands

The number of ligands can be known from either a picture of the coordination compound and counting the amount of attachments to the central atom, or by looking at the coordination number(s) in the compound name or chemical formula.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:11 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: what is a ligand?
Replies: 8
Views: 173

Re: what is a ligand?

A ligand can be an ion or a molecule that is a Lewis base (electron donor) that binds to the central atom or ion in the d-metal complex. They are important because they help make coordination compounds.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Nov 26, 2018 3:04 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Multiple bonds and electron density
Replies: 3
Views: 49

Re: Multiple bonds and electron density

Just to add to this, the electrons in double and triple bonds do not have as much repulsion as lone pair electrons because they are in stable bonds with other electrons and it is harder for bonded electrons to move freely in space, just as double and triple bonds are harder to break.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Nov 26, 2018 3:01 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Types of Lone Pairs
Replies: 2
Views: 53

Re: Types of Lone Pairs

The difference between an equatorial and axial lone pair is that an axial lone pair is on the axis of the molecule, as seen most commonly in the octahedral, trigonal bipyramidal, see saw, and square pyramidal shapes. The axial lone pair strongly repels the electron pairs in the three equatorial bond...
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Nov 26, 2018 2:50 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR
Replies: 9
Views: 135

Re: VSEPR

The strengths of the repulsions are as follows:
lone pair-lone pair > lone pair-atom > atom-atom
Also, keep in mind that the lowest energy is achieved when the lone pairs are as far from each other as possible, and this is where the length of the bond angles come into play.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Nov 26, 2018 2:42 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Homework Help Chapter 4 #5
Replies: 2
Views: 53

Re: Homework Help Chapter 4 #5

The way I answered the problem was that the shape of ClO2 + ion is angular but the electron arrangment is trigonal planar because there is a lone pair on the central atom Cl and this lone pair would make the bond angle slightly less than 120 degrees.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Nov 19, 2018 1:12 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Octahedral to Square Planar
Replies: 7
Views: 108

Re: Octahedral to Square Planar

An octahedral shape needs 6 surrounding atoms around the central atom and if a molecule has two pairs of lone pair electrons and 4 additional atoms, then the lone pairs would go on the axial position of the octahedral shape because that is where the lone pairs are farthest from each other, which mea...
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Nov 19, 2018 1:04 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Electron geometry vs molecular shape
Replies: 4
Views: 54

Re: Electron geometry vs molecular shape

I think that knowing how to identify both the electron geometry and molecular shape will be important for the upcoming test. Simply remember that the electron geometry only takes into account all regions of high electron density that includes lone pair and bonded electrons. Also keep in mind that a ...
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Nov 19, 2018 12:58 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Naming the Shape
Replies: 16
Views: 247

Re: Naming the Shape

I think it is best to memorize all of the possible shapes and it would possibly help to also understand which shapes can be made from the different electron arrangements, such as an electron arrangement of trigonal planar can lead to an angular molecular shape if I am not mistaken. Just little conne...
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:42 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Change in Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 287

Re: Change in Energy

Just to add to this, I believe that when the change in energy is positive, the electron moves up in energy levels, and when the change in energy is negative, then there is a loss in energy and the electron goes to a lower energy level.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:37 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Electron Configuration
Replies: 9
Views: 363

Re: Electron Configuration

Does this mean that Pd is another exception along with Cu and Cr?
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:32 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Exceptions to electron configuration
Replies: 3
Views: 67

Re: Exceptions to electron configuration

Just to add to the previous answers, I believe they are the exceptions because adding an electron to the d orbital and removing an electron from the s orbital puts the atoms in the lowest energy state.
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Oct 15, 2018 2:24 am
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Planck's constant
Replies: 7
Views: 113

Re: Planck's constant

Planck's constant is equivalent to 6.63x10^-34 or 6.626x10^-34, depending on the sig figs and is measured in Joules. It is also represented by the variable "h".
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Oct 15, 2018 2:17 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric effect and atomic spectra difference
Replies: 3
Views: 89

Re: Photoelectric effect and atomic spectra difference

Just for quick clarification, the electron that is emitted during the photoelectric effect is released in the form of heat? Or simply just energy? Or does it depend on the type of metal used?
by Carlos Gomez 3H
Mon Oct 15, 2018 2:10 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Threshold energy
Replies: 2
Views: 73

Threshold energy

I am a little confused on what the threshold energy concept is about, can someone clarify it in regards to the photoelectric effect?

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