Search found 30 matches

by nolansheow3G
Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:12 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Acids
Replies: 3
Views: 107

Re: Acids

For the most part, when questions ask you to determine which compound is an "acid", they are referring to the Bronsted definition of an acid.
by nolansheow3G
Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:09 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Neutral Ligand
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Neutral Ligand

What makes a ligand "neutral"?
by nolansheow3G
Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:07 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: OH- vs -OH
Replies: 3
Views: 104

Re: OH- vs -OH

Our TA said it was purely a personal preference. There is no difference between the two so don't get too confused.
by nolansheow3G
Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:25 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Biological Importance
Replies: 1
Views: 71

Biological Importance

Can somebody explain the biological importance of coordination compounds and how these compounds actually influence biological systems?
by nolansheow3G
Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:23 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Identifying the difference
Replies: 6
Views: 118

Re: Identifying the difference

Bronsted Acids and bases are more commonly used and considered a more widely accepted definition. Just be careful with what the problem asks so you know which definition to use.
by nolansheow3G
Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:21 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Zinc Nitrate
Replies: 2
Views: 80

Re: Zinc Nitrate

The formula for Zinc Nitrate is Zn(NO3)2.

Theoretically you could use Zn(OH)2 (base) and add 2HNO3 (acid) to get Zinc Nitrate and water, though I'm not sure if this is possible in real life.
by nolansheow3G
Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:18 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted Acids and Bases
Replies: 4
Views: 116

Re: Bronsted Acids and Bases

Another quick (but much less reliable way) would be to think about common compounds that have just one more or one less proton. Ex: Given NH4+, try to recall a compound you've seen before (NH3) Same with OH- and H20, H30+ and H2O, HNO3 and NO3-, etc. I would only recommend using this method if you a...
by nolansheow3G
Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:12 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Donating H protons
Replies: 2
Views: 83

Re: Donating H protons

It depends on if the molecule the two hydrogen atoms are attached to will be stable. Molecules tend to exist in the most stable state, so if removing the hydrogen makes the molecule unstable, it isn't likely to donate two hydrogen atoms. For example: H2SO4 is likely to lose the two hydrogen because ...
by nolansheow3G
Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:07 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Electronegativity and Acidity
Replies: 1
Views: 59

Re: Electronegativity and Acidity

HF is a weak acid because fluorine is relatively small compared to the other atoms in its group. This makes the bond length shorter and therefore makes the H-F bond relatively strong. A stronger bond results in a weaker acid because HF is less likely to dissociate in to H+ and F-. I'm not exactly su...
by nolansheow3G
Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:20 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR Shapes
Replies: 4
Views: 100

Re: VSEPR Shapes

T shaped has two pairs of unpaired electrons (AX3E2). Trigonal pyramidal has only one pair of unpaired electrons AX3E. Remember that the shape of a molecule is determined both by bonded AND unbonded pairs.
by nolansheow3G
Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:17 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecular Shape
Replies: 2
Views: 54

Re: Molecular Shape

Yes, VSEPR is the reason why the shapes exist. The valence shell electron repulsion is what gives molecules their geometric shape, as atoms orient themselves so that they are the farthest distance from eachother (a result of the repulsion).
by nolansheow3G
Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:14 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR Model
Replies: 3
Views: 74

Re: VSEPR Model

Not exactly - you could memorize each individual shape based on the number of bonded and unbonded pairs. However, you are basically doing the same with the AXE notation and it's extremely helpful to know. You can memorize which AXE formula corresponds to a certain shape, which will make it easier to...
by nolansheow3G
Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:53 am
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Strength of Bonds
Replies: 9
Views: 239

Re: Strength of Bonds

Boiling and melting are both physical changes, not chemical changes. Therefore the intermolecular forces are at play - if the intramolecular forces were affected then it would be a chemical change.
by nolansheow3G
Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:48 am
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: induced-dipole
Replies: 3
Views: 251

Re: induced-dipole

Also note that induced dipoles are more common in compounds with a larger amount of electrons. So a compound like C6H12 would be more likely to have an induced dipole than CH4.
by nolansheow3G
Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:45 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent vs Hydrogen bond in H20
Replies: 4
Views: 108

Re: Covalent vs Hydrogen bond in H20

Covalent bonds are intramolecular bonds, which would be the bonds between the oxygen and hydrogen in H2O. Due to the electronegativity difference between hydrogen and oxygen, the electron distribution becomes uneven which allows for intermolecular bonds known as hydrogen bonding.
by nolansheow3G
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:14 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: How many valence electrons?
Replies: 1
Views: 48

How many valence electrons?

How many valence electrons are in:

[Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p3

[Ar] 3d5 4s2
by nolansheow3G
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:09 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Electron Affinity
Replies: 2
Views: 44

Electron Affinity

Does electron affinity need to be taken into account when drawing Lewis Dot Structures? I briefly remember Dr. Lavelle mentioning Electron Affinity as we left lecture on Monday.
by nolansheow3G
Wed Oct 31, 2018 10:46 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: The Number of Valence Electrons in Transition Metals
Replies: 2
Views: 77

The Number of Valence Electrons in Transition Metals

Hi, how do you know the number of valence electrons for transition metals? One of the homework questions asked "How many valence electrons are in Mn?" The answer is 7, but how can you tell?
by nolansheow3G
Fri Oct 26, 2018 4:38 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: octets
Replies: 13
Views: 265

Re: octets

The only elements with full octets are the noble gases. Other elements must bond to form compounds in order to get a full octet. You can use the periodic table to see how many electrons an element has based on its group number.
by nolansheow3G
Fri Oct 26, 2018 4:32 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Valence Electrons
Replies: 2
Views: 73

Re: Valence Electrons

Elements are also the most stable when they have an electron configuration similar to that of a noble gas, which is why most compounds follow the octet rule (with the exception of compounds including H, He, Li, and Be).
by nolansheow3G
Fri Oct 26, 2018 4:26 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Valence Electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 90

Re: Valence Electrons

Start by checking the element's location on the periodic table. Elements in Group 1 have one valence electron, those in group 2 have two valence electrons. Then skip to group 13, under Boron. Group 13 elements have 3 valence electrons, then group 14 has 4, group 15 has 5, and so on until you reach g...
by nolansheow3G
Sat Oct 20, 2018 12:49 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Periodic Table Trends
Replies: 5
Views: 125

Re: Periodic Table Trends

As you go down a group, the atomic radius increases because the electrons are at larger distances from the nucleus. As you move across a row, the increased amount of protons pull the electrons closer, making it harder to remove (since protons in nucleus attract) and therefore increase IE. Moving dow...
by nolansheow3G
Sat Oct 20, 2018 12:39 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Nodes of F Orbital
Replies: 1
Views: 31

Nodes of F Orbital

Hi, one of the homework questions asked for how many nodes an F orbital has. Does anyone know? Also, is there a way to find out how many nodes each type has or is it just memorization?
by nolansheow3G
Sat Oct 13, 2018 1:24 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: The PhotoElectric Effect
Replies: 2
Views: 45

The PhotoElectric Effect

How does the photoelectric effect support the idea that electromagnetic radiation has properties of particles?
by nolansheow3G
Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:36 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Test 1 and Future Tests
Replies: 5
Views: 319

Re: Test 1 and Future Tests

Honestly, I don't think there's any way to show your work for those questions. Maybe just show all your attempts, but even then it gets messy (since we're using pen). I doubt the TA's will care, and if they do - I'm screwed because I didn't show my work ... I just put my final answer.
by nolansheow3G
Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:30 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Rounding Using Significant Figures
Replies: 10
Views: 533

Re: Rounding Using Significant Figures

I've always kept significant figures running in the calculator, regardless of whether you're using multiplication, division, addition, or subtraction. While the rules above about significant figures is correct, most, if not all tests will allow the use of a calculator, so you can just do all the cal...
by nolansheow3G
Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:16 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Studying techniques
Replies: 12
Views: 270

Re: Studying techniques

I would also try using videos on Youtube. I used Youtube for the majority of AP Chem and there are a lot of quality tutorials online - many include practice problems. The textbook has some tricky wording on some of the problems so if you've never seen a certain type of problem (like limiting reactan...
by nolansheow3G
Thu Oct 04, 2018 4:27 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Problem F.1b
Replies: 3
Views: 112

Re: Problem F.1b

Our TA told us that if he was grading (which he is) he would not mark us off. However, he said that if we keep the calculations running in our calculator and round at the very end, our answer should match the answer key.
by nolansheow3G
Thu Oct 04, 2018 4:25 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Molar Masses
Replies: 9
Views: 188

Re: Molar Masses

Will we be allowed to use graphing calculators? Or will I have to go out and buy a scientific calculator?
by nolansheow3G
Thu Oct 04, 2018 4:23 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Homework Questions [ENDORSED]
Replies: 14
Views: 278

Re: Homework Questions [ENDORSED]

Will homework always be due on Friday during the lecture? Or will we switch to turning in HW to the TA during our discussion period? Just wondering because what if we have to turn in homework that wasn't covered yet (in case our lecture is after our discussion period).

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