Search found 64 matches

by Shubham Rai 2C
Mon Mar 11, 2019 6:58 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Pre equilibrium approach
Replies: 2
Views: 15

Re: Pre equilibrium approach

We can substitute the [N2O2] with [NO]^2 because we can use the equilibrium concept that K = [N2O2]/[NO]^2 because the second step in the reaction is slow and creates a bottleneck. So you just have to solve for [N2O2], which is K[NO]^2.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Mar 05, 2019 7:07 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: How to calculate [A]t in 7B.3 7th ed
Replies: 1
Views: 23

Re: How to calculate [A]t in 7B.3 7th ed

What you are doing is finding the leftover [A] because if you just do (2molA/1molB)(0.034molB/L), it gives you the change in [A] based on how much the [B] changed. That's why you have to subtract the change from the initial to get the [A]t.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Mar 05, 2019 7:01 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Finding Order for Each Reactant
Replies: 4
Views: 31

Re: Finding Order for Each Reactant

It doesn't matter what the ratio is but you should logically get a whole number as 1/4 doesn't make sense when dealing with rates and n value. In one of the cases you will have to flip the ratio after you do the calculations.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Mar 05, 2019 6:59 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: does k change if rxn is multiplied?
Replies: 6
Views: 39

Re: does k change if rxn is multiplied?

The Kr shouldn't really change as when you multiply the rxn, both the reactants and products will be affected and should cancel the multiplication.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Mar 05, 2019 6:47 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: First Order Integrated Law
Replies: 3
Views: 19

Re: First Order Integrated Law

The difference is probably due to what the [A] value is. The - is probably associated with reactants while the equation with the - is associated with products.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:07 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Oxidizing vs Reducing Agent
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: Oxidizing vs Reducing Agent

In this reaction, the element Cr is oxidized while Mn is reduced. Thus, Cr3+ will be the reducing agent and MnO2 will be the oxidizing agent.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:02 am
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: ln(k2/k1)=(-delta H/R)(1/T2 - 1/T1)
Replies: 3
Views: 61

Re: ln(k2/k1)=(-delta H/R)(1/T2 - 1/T1)

This is a derived equation from the formula of delta G (standard) = -RTlnK where you solve for K for two different T value. You have to combine the two different T equations to find the equation ln(k2/k1)=(-delta H/R)(1/T2 - 1/T1). So technically it is on the equation sheet, but you can memorize it ...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Mon Feb 25, 2019 11:57 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Pt(s) in cell diagram
Replies: 4
Views: 32

Re: Pt(s) in cell diagram

You would add Pt to the Ce4+ side of the diagram as it has no solids to conduct the charges. We use Pt when there are no solids in the half reaction.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Mon Feb 25, 2019 4:50 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Addition of Platinum to a Cell
Replies: 1
Views: 14

Re: Addition of Platinum to a Cell

Platinum is added as it is an inert metal that is able to conduct the current but doesn't interact with the solutions itself. Platinum can be added to either, cathode and anode, or both. Its usually used when there is no solid to conduct the charge in the cell.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Mon Feb 25, 2019 4:42 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Homework question
Replies: 3
Views: 26

Re: Homework question

After balancing the two half-reactions, the number of electrons will be the value of n for the equation.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Mon Feb 25, 2019 4:40 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: reversing reaction [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 40

Re: reversing reaction [ENDORSED]

One of the half reactions has to be reversed in order to balance the number of electrons on both sides of the overall reaction.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Mon Feb 25, 2019 4:37 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Calculations [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Re: Calculations [ENDORSED]

When referencing entropy, the temperature should be 0 degrees Kelvin as that's when a compound will not have any vibrational or rotational entropy.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Mon Feb 25, 2019 4:14 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Standard Cell Potential [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 29

Re: Standard Cell Potential [ENDORSED]

When calculating the standard cell potential, we must to look at appropriate half reactions and combine them to get the appropriate cell potential. Most likely if there is no half-reaction for a compound, then it probably can't be used to find the standard cell potential.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Feb 12, 2019 6:29 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: 6th edition 9.75
Replies: 1
Views: 18

Re: 6th edition 9.75

You will have to draw an octahedral shape with two particles of X and 4 particles of Y. For cis, you have to look at the arrangements were the X particles can be close to each other. This would result in 12 different orientations while for tran you have to make sure the X particles are opposite to e...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Feb 12, 2019 6:04 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Problem 9.13 6th edition
Replies: 1
Views: 41

Re: Problem 9.13 6th edition

The key wording of the problem is "assume ideal behavior", this basically states that assume all the unknown values are that of an ideal gas. In this case that would be that the n value is 1 mole.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Feb 12, 2019 6:01 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: moles and entropy
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Re: moles and entropy

1 mol should be used in the equations whenever the problem states that the gas is an Ideal Gas and thus has ideal gas properties. When dealing with ideal gas, you assume 1 mole if not explicitly stated.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:18 am
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Calculating W
Replies: 1
Views: 29

Re: Calculating W

Yes, you are correct that the degeneracy of BF3 would be 1 as you can't distinguish between the positions the F atoms occupy. For BF2Cl the degeneracy value would be 3 as the Cl could occupy any of the three bonds in the triangular planar shape.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:15 am
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Nonspontaneous Changes
Replies: 1
Views: 31

Re: Nonspontaneous Changes

Any form of heat transfer into the system should satisfy the need for nonspontaneous changes as long as the energy is sufficient enough to cause the change.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:12 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Units for Ccal?
Replies: 1
Views: 20

Re: Units for Ccal?

I doubt they would mark you off for switching the signs from K to C but most equations use the value of K for a proper answer and if you use the C value you would get an incorrect answer. So it better to just stick to K.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:10 am
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Reversible and constant pressure
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: Reversible and constant pressure

When the process is reversible and the pressure is held constant, there are changes in the temperature that causes the gas to expand or contract, resulting in the work done on or by the system.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Feb 01, 2019 8:35 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Enthalpy
Replies: 3
Views: 45

Re: Enthalpy

Enthalpy is equal to the internal energy plus the pressure times the volume. Thus, it can be calculated for any reactions. For reactions with a fixed volume, the change in v is 0, therefore, the enthalpy value equals the internal energy.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Feb 01, 2019 8:19 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Heating Curve
Replies: 2
Views: 44

Re: Heating Curve

Melting and vaporizing do have to do with breaking small intermolecular bonds, however, I think that the majority of the heat is transferred to the molecules themselves and is translated into kinetic energy. I infer this as the molecules in the liquid state move around at greater speeds than those a...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Feb 01, 2019 2:44 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Analogy of Boulder
Replies: 5
Views: 52

Re: Analogy of Boulder

This analogy was related to the concept of a reaction occurring spontaneously. I think that Dr. Lavelle just wanted to convey the idea that reactions will have a certain outcome, say the rock rolling down, if not influenced by the surrounding. The rock is not likely to go up the hill, similarly, a r...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Jan 25, 2019 12:34 am
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: determining x for weak acids and bases
Replies: 6
Views: 63

Re: determining x for weak acids and bases

Conjugate acid is the molecule formed on the product side when a base reacts with water and gains hydrogen. Similarly, a conjugate base is the molecule formed when the acid loses hydrogen during a reaction. Thus, each reaction has a conjugate acid/base pair.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Jan 25, 2019 12:30 am
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Ka
Replies: 6
Views: 80

Re: Ka

Since it is a strong acid it doesn't have a Ka value as it dissociates completely in the reaction.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Jan 25, 2019 12:29 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: K and temp changes
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Re: K and temp changes

The simplest way to look at is that for an exothermic reaction, Kc decreases with the increase in temperature, while for an endothermic reaction the Kc increases with increase in temperature. The amount that the Kc value changes by is probably dependent on the reaction.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Jan 18, 2019 10:39 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Example in class
Replies: 5
Views: 51

Re: Example in class

I agree Q is used when the reaction is not at equilibrium. The Q value then will allow us to predict the direction the reaction will proceed when compared to Kc.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Jan 18, 2019 3:24 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: When is X negligible.
Replies: 6
Views: 55

Re: When is X negligible.

Usually, it depends on the problem. You can ignore the X when the K value is smaller than 10^-3. However, for the numerator, it would be best to keep the x as usually, that's the x value that is being solved for.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Jan 18, 2019 3:21 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Kp or Kc
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Re: Kp or Kc

I agree, typically use Kc for aqueous solutions while Kp for gases. You can also convert Kp to Kc using the equation Kp = Kc [RT]^ng, where ng is the sum of the constants of products and reactants.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Jan 18, 2019 3:14 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE table
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: ICE table

When the is a coefficient in front of a product, you must use it while constructing the equation for K when solving for x. The coefficient is used as a power value in the equation. Ex. 2NO would be [NO]^2 in a K equation.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Thu Jan 10, 2019 6:01 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Temperature Units
Replies: 4
Views: 25

Re: Temperature Units

The temperature will be unique for each of the problems as reactions can take place at different temperatures and the Kc value is also affected by the temperature thus each reaction will have a unique value of K (Kelvin).
by Shubham Rai 2C
Thu Jan 10, 2019 5:59 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Partial Pressures Definition
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Re: Partial Pressures Definition

Partial Pressure is basically the pressure exerted by one gas in a mixture of multiple in a specific volume. You don't have to use partial pressure for gases per se, but gases are often measured by their pressure instead of their concentration. Also, you can't measure pressure for other states thus ...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Thu Jan 10, 2019 5:55 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE Table Units
Replies: 4
Views: 48

Re: ICE Table Units

I agree you should use molarity during the ICE table problems as you have to deal with the value of K, and K requires you to solve for the molarity. So it's more convenient to use the molarity.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Dec 08, 2018 8:19 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: hybridization of the central atom
Replies: 1
Views: 32

Re: hybridization of the central atom

So far in this class, we only focus on the central atoms. That and because the atoms usually are not hybridized and thus we don't have to account for that.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Dec 08, 2018 8:17 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: polarity
Replies: 1
Views: 41

Re: polarity

I don't think there is a specific method for determining the polarity of a single atom. When talking about polarity, it is a molecule with two or more atoms. To find the polarity of a molecule, you just have to look at the electronegativity and then treat them as vectors. If the vectors cancel then ...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Dec 01, 2018 5:46 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: kE in textbook
Replies: 1
Views: 23

Re: kE in textbook

I am not completely sure if we need to know this or not. But as for how do we know which is the connecting atom, the atom after the k is the atom that connects to the metal. In the first case N bonds with Fe from NCS while in the second one S bonds with Fe.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Nov 27, 2018 8:21 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: hybridization and radicals
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Re: hybridization and radicals

The radical should be included in the hybridization as it would still influence the bonds by repelling them away from itself.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Nov 27, 2018 8:15 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Double Bonds as Regions of Electron Density
Replies: 5
Views: 31

Re: Double Bonds as Regions of Electron Density

Double bonds still count as a single region of electron density. This is a crucial idea for the VSEPR model and the shapes of the molecules.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Tue Nov 27, 2018 8:13 am
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Drawing a Dipole
Replies: 6
Views: 52

Re: Drawing a Dipole

I think Professor Lavelle said that in this chem the arrow should point to the negative charge.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Wed Nov 21, 2018 10:45 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Repulsion
Replies: 2
Views: 52

Re: Repulsion

To me, it seems that the electrons would be the cause of the repulsion as the elections with similar spins would repel each other, causing repulsion between the atoms itself.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Wed Nov 21, 2018 10:24 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone Pairs on Axial vs. Equatorial Positions
Replies: 2
Views: 39

Re: Lone Pairs on Axial vs. Equatorial Positions

I think Dr. Lavelle said that this happens as the molecule wants to be in a state where the lone pairs are not in 90 degrees from the least number of bonds. So if the lone pairs occupy the axial position, they will be 90 degrees to 3 bonds while if they don't then it would be only 2 bonds.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Wed Nov 21, 2018 10:06 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: HW CH4 4.75 6TH EDITION
Replies: 1
Views: 13

Re: HW CH4 4.75 6TH EDITION

a) The elemental composition would give us the empirical formula CH4O, which agrees with the molar mass. This would give us a Lewis structure of the compound methanol. The Lewis structure would have a single bond between C and O with three H atoms bonded to O with single bonds and the fourth H bonde...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:38 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma and Pi Bonds affect on structure
Replies: 4
Views: 72

Re: Sigma and Pi Bonds affect on structure

The number of sigma and pi bonds don't influence the shape or structure of a molecule. This is because when determining the molecular shape, instead of the number of bonds we look at the electron regions as a single charged region.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:23 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma and pi bond
Replies: 1
Views: 42

Re: Sigma and pi bond

The first bond to form is always the sigma bond. There can only be one sigma bond between two atoms and any bonds formed after are the pi bonds due to the way the electrons of each atom interact with each year. Thus, a double bond has one sigma bond and pi bond, while triple bonds are made of one si...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:19 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecular Shape
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: Molecular Shape

Molecule shapes can be predicted based on the Lewis dot structures using the VSEPR theory. It states that electron pairs in the valence shell of an atom repel each other, resulting in the molecular geometry and shape.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Nov 10, 2018 8:48 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Energy of Intermolecular forces
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Re: Energy of Intermolecular forces

The negative values that we discussed represent the fact that -250KJ/mol of energy is needed to break a mole of the bonds. It is negative as the surrounding loses energy in the process of breaking the bonds.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:46 am
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: The 4th Dimension
Replies: 1
Views: 89

Re: The 4th Dimension

This question is quite interesting and really got me thinking. Personally, I don't think chemical structures can be expressed in 4-D. The reasoning for my thinking is because all these chemical structures exist in our world and thus must be bound by the 3-D model of our world. Even if there were 4-D...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:35 am
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Fluctuation
Replies: 3
Views: 81

Re: Fluctuation

Based on what we have learned so far, to me it seems that we can never be certain of electrons location in the orbitals. However, when a significant amount of the electrons are supposedly at one side of the atom, they can create a dipole moment that then induces a dipole moment in the adjacent molec...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:30 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Repulsion Strength
Replies: 2
Views: 51

Re: Repulsion Strength

That list compares the bond strength of the three different interactions that occur around the central atom involving electrons. The list just states that the repulsion between two pairs of lone electrons is greater than the repulsion between a lone pair and a bonded pair. Finally, the interaction b...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:50 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Valence shells
Replies: 1
Views: 61

Re: Valence shells

Yes, when there are elections in the 4s and 4p shells, 3d shell doesn't contribute to the number of valence electrons due to the fact that valence electrons are calculated from the highest energy levels. The d orbitals only contribute to the valence electrons for any transition metals as the d orbit...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:41 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Delta Negative
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Re: Delta Negative

To my understanding, the Delta negative region is referencing the part of a molecule where the difference in the electronegativity between the atoms of a molecule forms a negative charge. This is also the concept of the dipoles, where one part of the molecule become negative and the becomes positive...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:36 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: How many valence electrons?
Replies: 1
Views: 29

Re: How many valence electrons?

There are 5 valence electrons in [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p3 (Arsenic), and 7 valence electrons in [Ar] 3d5 4s2 (Manganese). The transition metals can use the electrons in their d orbitals to bond while the other elements can't. Thus, Arsenic only has valence electrons in the s and p shells, while Manganese h...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Oct 26, 2018 10:08 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octet Exceptions
Replies: 3
Views: 85

Re: Octet Exceptions

H and He are exceptions to the Octet Rule because for them a full shell is only 2 electrons (the 1s shell). Li and Be are metals, and according to the periodic trends they are likely to lose electrons and become cations (Li+, Be2+). When that happens, they would have an electron configuration of a &...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Oct 26, 2018 9:57 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: 2.43 6th edition
Replies: 1
Views: 41

Re: 2.43 6th edition

You are supposed to always write the lowest energy levels based on their n number. Initially, it is easier to fill the 6s orbital but when the electrons begin to fill the 5d orbital, the overall energy of the 5d orbital is lower than the 6s orbital. Thus, we have to write the configuration from the ...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Fri Oct 26, 2018 9:44 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Writing electron configurations [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 71

Re: Writing electron configurations [ENDORSED]

I don't think it matters if its positive or negative, but we usually keep it positive as to not get confused while working with more than one electrons in the p, d, and f orbitals. This is because all the electrons must be of the same charge before they start pairing up. But there is probably a much...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Oct 20, 2018 3:23 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Homework Question 1E.1
Replies: 1
Views: 27

Re: Homework Question 1E.1

When the electron undergoes the transition from 1s-orbital to a 2p-orbital all of the choices are correct. This is because, when it jumps to a higher value of n (n=2) it gains energy as the n increased from 1 to 2. Also, the value of l increases as the p subshell represents l = 1 while the s subshel...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Oct 20, 2018 3:18 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Homework Question 1.D13
Replies: 2
Views: 24

Re: Homework Question 1.D13

There will be 7 values for l when n=7 but the highest value of l would be a 6. This is because l includes 0 as one of the values and to find the highest value of l we can use the equation (n-1).
by Shubham Rai 2C
Sat Oct 20, 2018 3:15 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: angular node
Replies: 1
Views: 15

Re: angular node

Yes, they are the same thing. As far as I know, they represent the same concept that no electron can be found within the region they represent. However, the plane might represent a plane shaped like a square, but the angular node could be other shapes such as the cone in the dz2 orbital.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Thu Oct 11, 2018 10:44 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Kinetic Energy of Electrons
Replies: 2
Views: 55

Re: Kinetic Energy of Electrons

This is because the work function, or the energy required to cause an electron ejection is fixed. So, based on the equation E = hv, as the frequency increases, the energy of the photon increases. ANd because the work function is a fixed value, the remaining energy is transferred to the ejected elect...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Thu Oct 11, 2018 10:39 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Uncertainty in Kinetic energy of electron [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 93

Re: Uncertainty in Kinetic energy of electron [ENDORSED]

In this case yes!! Just use the equation E = 1/2 m v^2. Using the uncertainty in the velocity in the equation will give you the uncertainty in the kinetic energy of the electron.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Thu Oct 11, 2018 10:32 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: H-Atom
Replies: 1
Views: 42

Re: H-Atom

When the hydrogen gets excited, the electron doesn't completely leave the hydrogen. The electron just absorbs the energy and gains energy levels, meaning it is in an excited state but still influenced by the pull from the hydrogen atom's nucleus. When the electron goes back to the ground state(where...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:24 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Molar Mass: E21
Replies: 3
Views: 80

Re: Molar Mass: E21

Yes, first convert all the values to their SI Unit equivalent. Then, find the molar mass of the compound in question using the periodic table. After getting the molar mass, fin the moles of the substance by dividing the amount present by the molar mass of that substance. Finally, to find the number ...
by Shubham Rai 2C
Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:04 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: E23C Sig Figs
Replies: 2
Views: 50

Re: E23C Sig Figs

The number of sig figs that you should use should be based on the measured value in the question, in this case, 25.2 kg. Thus, you should have 3 sig figs for your answer.
by Shubham Rai 2C
Wed Oct 03, 2018 9:57 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: V=n/c
Replies: 7
Views: 68

Re: V=n/c

That equation is derived from the equation c = n/V where c represents the molarity of a solution, n the moles of the substance being dissolved and V represents the volume of the solution.

Go to advanced search