Search found 63 matches

by Aurbal Popal
Sat Mar 16, 2019 11:27 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: atm to torr
Replies: 3
Views: 201

Re: atm to torr

Also, it is on the equation sheet!
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Mar 16, 2019 11:24 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: q and delta H
Replies: 6
Views: 255

Re: q and delta H

delta H = delta U + P delta V

when there is a constant pressure,

delta H= q

I think the q comes from the delta U (as delta U= q +w)

Hope this helps.
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Mar 16, 2019 11:14 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Slow and Fast step
Replies: 4
Views: 269

Re: Slow and Fast step

Jchellis 1I wrote:So we need to be able to find the intermediate for the final?


They will give us the intermediate steps. I do not know how else they would expect us to know what the intermediates are if they only give us the overall reaction. They might ask us to label the intermediates though.
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Mar 16, 2019 11:10 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: How to know which conducting element to add?
Replies: 3
Views: 184

Re: How to know which conducting element to add?

Basially what the other user said. I have also seen them use C, although Pt is used more.
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Mar 16, 2019 11:02 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: unique rate
Replies: 3
Views: 176

Re: unique rate

It can also tell you how fast a product will form or how fast a reactant will disappear in relation to other products or reactants
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Mar 09, 2019 9:16 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: 6th edition 14.47
Replies: 4
Views: 105

Re: 6th edition 14.47

Just wanted to say I also got that answer... We have this same exact question in the seventh edition (6.N13) so I am also confused as to why they completely disregarded the 2.68
by Aurbal Popal
Fri Mar 01, 2019 5:08 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Oxidation State
Replies: 4
Views: 86

Re: Oxidation State

If you do the half reactions, notice where the electrons end up. If they end up as a product, that means the compound lost electrons and was therefore oxidized. If the electrons are a reactant, that means the compound gained electrons and was reduced.
by Aurbal Popal
Fri Mar 01, 2019 5:05 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Cell Diagram
Replies: 4
Views: 122

Re: Cell Diagram

I could be wrong, but I think the oxidation number for S in S2O8^(2-) is +7 and the S in SO4^(2-) is +6. I drew it out but I think something is off... so I could be wrong.
by Aurbal Popal
Fri Mar 01, 2019 4:55 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Finding n for the equation ΔG⁰=-nFE⁰
Replies: 8
Views: 137

Re: Finding n for the equation ΔG⁰=-nFE⁰

Sarah_Kang_2K wrote:When it says "write the balanced half reactions", does this mean balance O's and H's, as well as electrons?
Or is it just like Cu2+(aq)--> Cu(s)


Yes, you have to balance the oxygens and hydrogens.
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Feb 28, 2019 8:16 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Knowing which atom was oxidized/ reduced
Replies: 3
Views: 72

Re: Knowing which atom was oxidized/ reduced

When I do half equations, I usually do not look for the oxidation numbers. I just note where the electrons are placed. If it is a product, that means that the substance lost electrons, which means that it was oxidized. If it is a reactant, then the substance gained electrons, which means reduction t...
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Feb 28, 2019 8:11 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Cell Diagrams
Replies: 3
Views: 81

Re: Cell Diagrams

To answer the second part, I do not think it matters, but so far I have seen Pt being used more than C.
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Feb 28, 2019 8:10 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Organization of cell diagrams
Replies: 9
Views: 111

Re: Organization of cell diagrams

Also, to add on to her question, you do not need to put Pt on both sides of the cell diagram if there is a solid on the other side, right?
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Feb 28, 2019 8:05 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Cell Reaction Order
Replies: 3
Views: 83

Re: Cell Reaction Order

The anode is where oxidation happens, so you will get an electron as a product. The anode is on the left side of the cell diagram. The cathode is where reduction happens so you will get an electron as a reactant. The cathode is on the right side of the cell diagram. When you calculate the cell poten...
by Aurbal Popal
Mon Feb 25, 2019 10:40 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: E not
Replies: 2
Views: 69

Re: E not

E not refers to the standard state potential. This means the potential of the cell is approximated under standard conditions- at 25 Celcius and with concentrations of 1 mole per liter (1 M). I think regular E is just... not at those conditions?... that's how I understood it at least. Edit: looked it...
by Aurbal Popal
Mon Feb 25, 2019 10:35 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: oxidation number
Replies: 2
Views: 51

Re: oxidation number

Someone else also asked this question, and this was my response: I usually figure it out by looking at the periodic table. There is a general pattern: Group 1 has an oxidation number of +1 Group 2: +2 Group 13 (with Boron): +3 Group 14: +4/-4 Group 15: -3 Group 16: -2 Group 17: -1 Group 18:0 I typic...
by Aurbal Popal
Mon Feb 25, 2019 10:32 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Oxidation number calculation
Replies: 1
Views: 39

Re: Oxidation number calculation

I usually figure it out by looking at the periodic table. There is a general pattern: Group 1 has an oxidation number of +1 Group 2: +2 Group 13 (with Boron): +3 Group 14: +4/-4 Group 15: -3 Group 16: -2 Group 17: -1 Group 18:0 I typically think about it like this: group one elements have one electr...
by Aurbal Popal
Wed Feb 13, 2019 12:21 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: HOTDOG #12 part B
Replies: 6
Views: 148

Re: HOTDOG #12 part B

(1)(219.2)(163)+(6)(29.4)(163) only gives you part of the answer as you need to heat it up from 37 to 200, then use the DeltaHrxn then cool it down from 200 to 37. DeltaH1=(1)(219.2)(163)+(6)(29.4)(163) DeltaH2=-2756kJ DeltaH3=(6)(37.1)(-163)+(6)(75.3)(-163) DeltaH1+DeltaH2+DeltaH3 Should give you ...
by Aurbal Popal
Sun Feb 10, 2019 3:36 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Clarifying about Midterm
Replies: 4
Views: 92

Clarifying about Midterm

I know Professor Lavelle said that the midterm will cover Thermodynamics until the end of entropy, but what does that mean exactly? Do we just have to know everything he taught up to but not including Free Gibbs Energy?
by Aurbal Popal
Sun Feb 03, 2019 10:50 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Bomb Calorimeter
Replies: 5
Views: 114

Re: Bomb Calorimeter

I believe all you need to know about a bomb calorimeter is that it is used to measure the temperature of a combustion reaction and that it would be considered a closed system. I think it might actually be an isolated system as you do not want the heat escaping in order to measure the heat of the re...
by Aurbal Popal
Sun Feb 03, 2019 10:49 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Open vs Closed System
Replies: 13
Views: 203

Re: Open vs Closed System

Think about it like this: If you had a reaction occurring in a beaker, and there was no lid, the reaction would be exposed to the air. Therefore, it may react with molecules in the air, such as oxygen and hydrogen, or gas produced by the reaction may escape. Energy would also go out to the environme...
by Aurbal Popal
Sun Feb 03, 2019 10:32 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Isolated systems
Replies: 2
Views: 50

Re: Isolated systems

They basically have no interaction with their environment, like a thermos- it basically tries to keep the temperature of whatever is inside constant, but of course, since isolated systems aren't always 100% effective, it will slowly go to the temperature of the environment. Isolated systems are impo...
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Jan 26, 2019 2:24 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Sublimation
Replies: 6
Views: 117

Re: Sublimation

Increasing pressure would push the equilibrium towards the side with less gaseous moles. It does not apply to solids or liquids.
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Jan 26, 2019 2:22 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Severe burn from steam clarification
Replies: 5
Views: 89

Re: Severe burn from steam clarification

In order for to convert water into steam, it has to absorb a lot of energy to change phases. From my understanding, when steam gets into contact with your hand, which is relatively cooler, it starts to condense. This means that all that energy that was required to change the liquid into a vapor in t...
by Aurbal Popal
Tue Jan 22, 2019 3:16 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Seventh edition 5I. 27 error?
Replies: 1
Views: 31

Seventh edition 5I. 27 error?

I think there might be an error in the solution manual but I wanted to make sure I'm not doing anything wrong and wanted to confirm. When I do the quadratic formula, I get a different number in the square root (4.84) than the solution manual (4.48). This then affects my final answer. I put what was ...
by Aurbal Popal
Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:44 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 7th edition: 6D.15
Replies: 2
Views: 64

7th edition: 6D.15

Calculate the pH of: a) .19 NH4Cl b) .055 M AlCl3 I saw a couple of posts that addressed this question, especially part b. I understand that Cl is not reactive and that water dissolves the aluminum, but that does not happen for NH4Cl so I was kind of confused as to why they were solved differently. ...
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Jan 19, 2019 3:08 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Changes in K
Replies: 4
Views: 75

Re: Changes in K

The only thing that changes K, the equilibrium constant, is temperature. Everything else just causes a shift equilibrium position, but not the equilibrium constant.
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Jan 19, 2019 3:06 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Water in K
Replies: 3
Views: 79

Water in K

So usually when we do the equilibrium constants, we do not include water in the equation as it is in excess. But when do we include water in the equation? Are there exceptions to this?
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Jan 10, 2019 4:32 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: H2O
Replies: 5
Views: 72

Re: H2O

Wait do we just ignore water as a liquid if we are doing partial pressures (Kp) or does this apply when we do Kc as well?
by Aurbal Popal
Tue Jan 08, 2019 10:01 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Equilibrium constants Kp notation
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Equilibrium constants Kp notation

When you are writing an expression for Kp, do you need to have P in brackets with the reactant/product as the subscript for P? For example, can you just put CO₂ in brackets, or do you have to put P(CO2) in brackets?
by Aurbal Popal
Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:50 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: K and Kc
Replies: 8
Views: 133

Re: K and Kc

The way I understood it, Kc is for molar concentration. There's also Kp but that's for partial pressures for gases. I think K is just the equilibrium constant and Kc is just a more specific way of denoting what you are finding.
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Dec 08, 2018 1:00 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Amphoteric
Replies: 4
Views: 238

Re: Amphoteric

Amphiprotic is something that can accept or donate a proton and can therefore act as an acid or an base. An amphiprotic compound is an example of an amphoteric compound, which has a more general definition as it is defined as any substance that can act as an acid or base. Amphiprotic is just more sp...
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:56 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: sigfigs for calculating pH
Replies: 1
Views: 181

Re: sigfigs for calculating pH

For you example, I would assume that the answer would have one sig fig because the 1L is the more uncertain measurement.

As for the second one, I think that is considered three sig figs... pretty sure the first number still counts.
by Aurbal Popal
Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:51 pm
Forum: Industrial Examples
Topic: Coordination compounds as Chemotherapy drugs
Replies: 2
Views: 435

Coordination compounds as Chemotherapy drugs

So I was looking at Lecture Outline 5 and one of the things we had to know was to "discuss well-known examples of coordination compounds used as chemotherapy drugs". I look in the textbook but all I can seem to find is the biological functions of coordination compounds but nothing on chemo...
by Aurbal Popal
Fri Dec 07, 2018 8:05 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: amphiprotic
Replies: 3
Views: 268

Re: amphiprotic

Amphiprotic is something that can accept or donate a proton and can therefore act as an acid or an base. An amphiprotic compound is an example of an amphoteric compound, which has a more general definition as it is any substance that can act as an acid or base. Amphiprotic is just more specific.
by Aurbal Popal
Fri Dec 07, 2018 2:25 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Compound
Replies: 2
Views: 63

Re: Coordination Compound

A chelate is found in coordination compounds. It is a ligand that is bonded to a central metal atom at two or more points. They typically make a ring structure
by Aurbal Popal
Fri Dec 07, 2018 2:18 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Fe coordination compounds
Replies: 4
Views: 96

Re: Naming Fe coordination compounds

"Fer-" is just the latin name. I do think you can say "iron", but if you do, you typically have to indicate the charge. Ferrous refers to iron that has a +2 charge, but if the iron has a +3 charge, it is called ferric. That is how I learned it in previous chemistry classes, but I...
by Aurbal Popal
Fri Dec 07, 2018 2:14 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted vs Lewis
Replies: 4
Views: 76

Re: Bronsted vs Lewis

emily gao 3L wrote:All Lewis Acid/bases are Bronsted Lowry acid/bases but not all Bronsted Lowry acid/bases are Lewis acid/bases. But B-L describes proton transfer while Lewis describes electron pair mvmt.


I think its the opposite way...
by Aurbal Popal
Fri Dec 07, 2018 2:12 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Inter and Intramolecular Forces
Replies: 3
Views: 131

Re: Inter and Intramolecular Forces

Intermolecular forces are forces between two (or more) independent molecules. These forces attract other molecules. For example, two water molecules have a hydrogen bond between them. Dipole-dipole and London Dispersion forces are also examples. Intramolecular forces are the forces between atoms wit...
by Aurbal Popal
Fri Dec 07, 2018 2:04 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Lewis Acids and Bases and Bronsted?
Replies: 5
Views: 102

Re: Lewis Acids and Bases and Bronsted?

People have already replied but I just wanted to add that Lewis acids and bases basically more general, while Bronstead acids and bases are a subclass of Lewis acids and bases and have a more specific definition
by Aurbal Popal
Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:32 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Textbook Question 9C.1
Replies: 2
Views: 69

Re: Textbook Question 9C.1

"Ferrus" is a common name for iron. It is latin. Some other metals are like this, such as tin (stannum). That is also why the symbol for iron is Fe and Tin is Sn. In CN, carbon creates a triple bond with nitrogen and has a lone pair. This means that the formal charges of nitrogen is 0 and ...
by Aurbal Popal
Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:16 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization of p orbitals
Replies: 3
Views: 115

Re: Hybridization of p orbitals

jillianh1B wrote:I thought that two p orbitals could hybridize with a pi bond.


Sorry I should have been more explicit. They can but why does it have to be a pi bond? why not in a sigma bond?
by Aurbal Popal
Mon Dec 03, 2018 9:33 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Determining oxidation number
Replies: 5
Views: 143

Re: Determining oxidation number

Is there an easy way to the oxidation number for ions like sulfate? This is the first time I take chem in my life (HS didnt offer it) so I feel behind in knowing oxidation numbers. Group 1 has an oxidation number of +1 Group 2: +2 Group 13 (with Boron): +3 Group 14: +4/-4 Group 15: -3 Group 16: -2 ...
by Aurbal Popal
Mon Dec 03, 2018 9:22 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Textbook Error?
Replies: 1
Views: 78

Re: Textbook Error?

An amphoteric compound is a compound that be a base or an acid, depending on the situation that compound is in. I am not sure what Lavelle's example was, but it was probably acidic in that situation. As for memorizing them, he did say that metalloids are typically amphoteric. I do not think that is ...
by Aurbal Popal
Mon Dec 03, 2018 8:40 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Coefficients for hybridization
Replies: 2
Views: 120

Coefficients for hybridization

During the lecture, most of the hybridizations had coefficients as well as the hybridization. For example, a bond between carbon atoms might have a hybridization of 2sp² but usually in the textbook they just ask for the sp² part. When is it necessary to add a two in front of it?
by Aurbal Popal
Mon Dec 03, 2018 7:35 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization of p orbitals
Replies: 3
Views: 115

Hybridization of p orbitals

Why can you not have a hybrid orbital of two p orbitals? For example, the hybridization of carbon is 2sp^2, but they have empty p orbitals, so why does a full s orbital hybridize with a p orbital?
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:57 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR forms
Replies: 3
Views: 62

Re: VSEPR forms

VSPER shapes are formed because the electron densities (in the form of lone pairs and single/double/triple bonds) around an atom repel each other and want to be as far away as possible to minimize the repulsion while maintaining the same distance from the central atom. Lone pairs have a stronger rep...
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:50 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: hydrogen bonding
Replies: 11
Views: 235

Re: hydrogen bonding

Chathuri Gunasekera 1G wrote:Hi! Hydrogen bonding is stronger than most intermolecular forces, so it is requires more energy to break those IMFs, and therefore needs a higher temperature for the compound to move from solid to liquid.


I thought covalent bonds and ionic bonds were stronger? Or do those not count as IMF?
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:45 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 7th Edition 2E.23
Replies: 1
Views: 22

Re: 7th Edition 2E.23

According to the solutions manual, having a double bonded oxygen is acceptable as it is more stable than having a single bonded oxygen. The formal charges with the single bonded oxygens are not disregarded though; the oxygen will have a formal charge of -1, but Sb would have a formal charge of +1, S...
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:35 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Maximum amount of bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 133

Re: Maximum amount of bonds

Sabrina Ryu 3L wrote:An element has too many bonds when the formal charge is unreasonably high. It should be relatively close to zero.


What is considered unreasonably high?
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:34 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 109.5 Degrees
Replies: 4
Views: 80

Re: 109.5 Degrees

If all the electron densities were on one plane, then the angle would be 90 degrees. However, since it is a three dimensional object, it can take advantage and spread out even more into more than one plane. Since the electron densities want to be far away from each other as possible, it will do so, ...
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:29 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma and Pi bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 97

Re: Sigma and Pi bonds

A single bond has a sigma bond. A double bond has both a sigma bond and a pi bond. A triple bond has one sigma bond and two pi bonds. Sigma bonds can happen between s and s orbitals, p and s orbitals, or s and p orbitals. The orbitals overlap end to end. Pi bonds usually just happen between p orbita...
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:19 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Trigonal Shapes
Replies: 4
Views: 69

Re: Trigonal Shapes

Like Henry said, trigonal planar has three bonds and hence three electron densities. All the electron densities are on one plane and are 120 degrees apart from each other as that is the farthest apart they can be from each other. Trigonal pyramidal also has three bonds, but they also have one lone p...
by Aurbal Popal
Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:12 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Maximum amount of bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 133

Maximum amount of bonds

What is the maximum amount of bonds an element can have? I know phosphorus can have five and sulfur can have six as they can use the d orbital to have more than four bonds, but how do we know when an element has too many bonds?
by Aurbal Popal
Mon Nov 12, 2018 1:38 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Cations and polarizing power
Replies: 3
Views: 58

Re: Cations and polarizing power

The way I understand it, since the diameter of the atom is smaller, the nucleus has a greater pull on other electrons. There is less shielding done by the electrons of the cation, so it will have more polarizing power. Smaller cations want electrons, and due to the size, they have a stronger hold on...
by Aurbal Popal
Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:24 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Midterm questions
Replies: 5
Views: 89

Re: Midterm questions

Eruchi Okpara 4D wrote:Will VSEPR be on the midterm?

No we did not go over that yet and none of the sections up to 2C cover it
by Aurbal Popal
Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:36 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: intensity
Replies: 4
Views: 115

Re: intensity

Intensity does not affect the energy of the photon. However, it does change the amount of photons present. That is why light with long wavelength (and low frequencies) cannot eject an electron even in high intensities; there may be more photons, but these photons do no individually have enough energ...
by Aurbal Popal
Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:25 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: electronegativity vs electron affinity
Replies: 4
Views: 82

Re: electronegativity vs electron affinity

Electron affinity is the energy released when a gaseous atom gains an electron. It is has units (kJ/mole). Electronegativity is a relative measure (does not have units as it cannot be directly measured) of the tendency of an atom to attract a pair of electrons in a covalent bond. From my understandi...
by Aurbal Popal
Sun Nov 04, 2018 1:11 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structures with Br
Replies: 1
Views: 38

Lewis Structures with Br

I know Br is an exception to the octet rule, but why is it in BrF3, there are two lone pairs on Br? I assumed there were none...
This is seen in problem 2b3 in the seventh edition where it asks for the Lewis structure of this molecule.
by Aurbal Popal
Sun Nov 04, 2018 12:58 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Complete Lewis Structures
Replies: 1
Views: 35

Re: Complete Lewis Structures

I think it just means that it wants all the lone pairs and that the atoms should have the right bonds, as well as the separate charges as the question is about salts.
by Aurbal Popal
Tue Oct 16, 2018 2:05 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Energy
Replies: 2
Views: 61

Re: Energy

You have to adapt the equation so that it relates to that of a photon. The speed of light equation is c= wavelength (lambda) x frequency (v) c= (lambda) v You can manipulate that equation so it looks like v=c/lambda and substitute that for v in E=hv so that you get E= h(c/lambda) I believe he said t...
by Aurbal Popal
Tue Oct 16, 2018 1:43 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: color of light
Replies: 11
Views: 258

color of light

What determines the color of light- the wavelength or the frequency? I keep seeing sources that contradict each other and I am a little confused. Are they just both dependent on each other or does one have more of an effect?
by Aurbal Popal
Tue Oct 16, 2018 1:35 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Test #2
Replies: 2
Views: 66

Re: Test #2

I believe it is going to be held next week during your discussion time.
by Aurbal Popal
Fri Oct 05, 2018 10:21 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Rounding up with Sig Figs
Replies: 3
Views: 145

Re: Rounding up with Sig Figs

Usually when a number ends in five, you round up. The number preceding it does not have any effect as to whether you round up or down. So in your case, the number should round up to 2.7.

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