Search found 60 matches

by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Mar 09, 2019 6:14 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: pH and van’t hoff
Replies: 6
Views: 49

Re: pH and van’t hoff

With a temperature change, the K changes, so then the pH would also change because the concentration of H+ changes.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Mar 09, 2019 6:11 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Slow step
Replies: 2
Views: 17

Re: Slow step

The slow step is the one with the slowest rate, k. The reaction can only be as fast as the slowest step, so the reaction rate becomes that of the slowest step.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Fri Mar 08, 2019 4:56 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Test 2
Replies: 6
Views: 76

Re: Test 2

For the snowflakes, delta H is negative because the snowflakes lose heat, and delta S is negative because going from a liquid to a solid is less chaotic. Negative delta H minus a negative delta S makes a negative delta G. For the sublimation, delta H is positive because heat is going in, and delta S...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Mar 03, 2019 2:22 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: E° is 0 for Concentration Cells
Replies: 3
Views: 37

Re: E° is 0 for Concentration Cells

In concentration cells, it is the same metal being reduced and oxidized so when you subtract the E of the anode from the E of the cathode, you will get 0.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Mar 03, 2019 2:21 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: K value- Temp
Replies: 6
Views: 53

Re: K value- Temp

Using leChatelier's principle, when the temperature is changed, depending on whether the reaction is endothermic or exothermic, the reaction will favor either the reactants or the products. We use the equation -deltaH/R(1/T2 - 1/T1) = ln(K2/K1) to find what the new K is when the temperature is chang...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Mar 03, 2019 2:18 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Nernst Equation
Replies: 4
Views: 45

Re: Nernst Equation

In the Nernst equation, there are the constants R and F which should be given. Temperature is usually 298K. You can find n using the standard reduction potentials and K can be found with the concentrations or partial pressures. Ecell can also be found using standard reduction potentials.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Mon Feb 25, 2019 6:54 am
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Question 9.65 (Sixth Edition)
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Re: Question 9.65 (Sixth Edition)

You calculate the delta S for each reaction of formation, because if delta S is more negative, then delta G will be more positive. If you look at the equation for Gibbs Free Energy: delta G = delta H - T delta S, the delta S will need to be more negative to make delta G positive. If delta G is posit...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Mon Feb 25, 2019 6:48 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Tips for Discussion Test
Replies: 6
Views: 49

Re: Tips for Discussion Test

I have found it helpful to create my own outline of what we have learned based on the lecture notes, and reinforcing it with the relevant chapters in the textbook and Dr Lavelle's outlines.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Thu Feb 21, 2019 9:03 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Weekly Homework
Replies: 3
Views: 28

Re: Weekly Homework

You should ask your TA what homework problems they want, and in general, you should usually follow what we are learning in class.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Wed Feb 20, 2019 10:14 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Delta H
Replies: 5
Views: 34

Re: Delta H

There is a chart in the 7th edition pg. 330 that I found helpful for this. It's table 4J.1. I can write it here also: Delta H Delta S Spontaneous? negative positive yes, delta G < 0 negative positive yes, if TdeltaS < deltaH and deltaG < 0 positive positive yes, if TdeltaS > deltaH and deltaG < 0 po...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Wed Feb 20, 2019 10:06 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Midterm Question
Replies: 5
Views: 60

Re: Midterm Question

K is the [P]/[R] so if K is very large, the [P]>[R]. Because the concentration of products is greater at equilibrium, the products must be more stable, because the reaction favors them.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Wed Feb 20, 2019 10:03 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Midterm Question (#3.D)
Replies: 2
Views: 37

Re: Midterm Question (#3.D)

The reaction is with a polyprotic acid, so it can donate more than one proton, so there will be more than one reaction. They are asking for the second reaction, so you must first write the reaction with the first proton donated, then write the reaction with the second proton donated.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Tue Feb 12, 2019 5:09 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: units
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Re: units

The units of q, delta U, and delta H depend on the other units in the problem, but they will always be in either J or kJ.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Tue Feb 12, 2019 4:59 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Problem 4F.11 7th Edition
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Problem 4F.11 7th Edition

Problem 4F.11 asks you to find the change in entropy when the volume changes from 3L to 0.5L and the temperature changes from 291.5K to 301.1K. When calculating delta S for the temperature change, the solutions used delta S = nRln(T2/T1). Why didn't they use delta S = nCln(T2/T1)?
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Tue Feb 12, 2019 4:54 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Test 1 Question
Replies: 3
Views: 45

Re: Test 1 Question

If delta H is positive that means that the reaction is endothermic. In an endothermic reaction, if the temperature is increased the reaction will favor the forward reaction.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Mon Feb 04, 2019 8:03 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: HW question
Replies: 1
Views: 46

Re: HW question

Work is being done by the system against the atmosphere, so work should be positive.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Mon Feb 04, 2019 8:00 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Thermodynamic equations
Replies: 1
Views: 28

Re: Thermodynamic equations

The heat capacity equation varies depending on whether there is constant pressure or constant volume. You use q=nCT, but for constant pressure, C=(5/2)R, and for constant volume, C=(3/2)R. W = - P x ∆V is used to find work, which is then used in the equation ∆U = q + w. For ∆U = q + w, if volume is ...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Mon Feb 04, 2019 7:47 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Important Thermochemistry Equations
Replies: 3
Views: 42

Re: Important Thermochemistry Equations

Going off of the equation sheet on the website, we should know:
Ideal gas, Cp = (5/2) R
Ideal gas, Cv = (3/2) R
Ideal gas, U = 3/2 nRT
∆U = q + w
q = n C ∆T
W = - P x ∆V
PV = nRT
w= -nRTln(V2/V1)
Those are all of the Thermochemistry equations that I could find on the sheet.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Fri Feb 01, 2019 2:40 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Analogy of Boulder
Replies: 5
Views: 51

Re: Analogy of Boulder

He was saying that a boulder could just roll down the hill on its own, so it wouldn't require work to roll down the hill. But, the boulder will not roll up the hill on its own, so it will require work to be pushed up the hill.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Fri Feb 01, 2019 9:48 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 4B13 7th edition
Replies: 1
Views: 16

Re: 4B13 7th edition

Look at the units of the two constants and see which one will give you the units of what you are solving for.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Fri Feb 01, 2019 9:46 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Cvm and Cpm ?
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: Cvm and Cpm ?

Cv is used when there is constant volume and Cp is used when there is constant pressure.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Jan 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: 4C.1- molar heat capacity (7th edition)
Replies: 1
Views: 29

Re: 4C.1- molar heat capacity (7th edition)

The book states that the molar heat capacity increases with molecular complexity. The molar heat capacity of nonlinear molecules is higher than linear molecules because nonlinear molecules can rotate about three axes, not just two axes. I don't think we have gone over this in class yet.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Jan 27, 2019 3:49 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Lecture 1/25
Replies: 1
Views: 29

Re: Lecture 1/25

He talked about how the third method to solve for enthalpy is to use standard enthalpies of formation. You take the standard enthalpies of formation of all the reactants and subtract them from all the standard enthalpies of formation of all the products. This can be used to solve for the standard re...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Jan 27, 2019 3:46 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 3 Methods to solve for Enthaply
Replies: 3
Views: 37

Re: 3 Methods to solve for Enthaply

The first method is to use multiple chemical reactions and add them together to find the enthalpy of a certain reaction. The second method is to use bond enthalpies adding the bonds broken with the bonds formed. This method is the most accurate for diatomic molecules, and the rest are averages, so t...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Wed Jan 16, 2019 8:51 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: 7th Edition 6B.9
Replies: 1
Views: 22

7th Edition 6B.9

For parts (i) and (ii) of the problem, we are given the [H30+] = 1.50M and [OH-] = 1.50M respectively. When I calculated the pH and pOH, I found that the answer was -0.176. When we know that taking the log of the concentration will give us a positive answer, do we just not put a negative sign in fro...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Tue Jan 15, 2019 4:16 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Exothermic vs. Endothermic Reaction
Replies: 9
Views: 74

Exothermic vs. Endothermic Reaction

How do we know if a reaction is endothermic or exothermic? Can we only know if we are given delta H?
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Mon Jan 14, 2019 10:26 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: pH question
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: pH question

You need to use the formula M1V1=M2V2 because the volume of the container was changed. You have the original volume and concentration, and the new volume, so you must solve for the new concentration.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Mon Jan 14, 2019 3:45 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: 7th Edition 5J.13
Replies: 1
Views: 25

7th Edition 5J.13

Question 5J.13 asks if there will be more ammonia will be formed if an equilibrium mixture containing 2.23 mmol N2 and 6.69 mmol H2 in a 500. mL container is increased in temperature from 600. K to 700. K. K=1.7x10^-3 at 600. K and K=7.8x10^-5 at 700.K. How does this problem relate to LeChatelier's ...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Mon Jan 14, 2019 3:20 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5I.23 7th Edition
Replies: 1
Views: 40

Re: 5I.23 7th Edition

In the solutions, they are using moles instead on molarity in the ICE table. They then convert to molarity after they have done the ICE table.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:13 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 7th edition 5I.13 Part C
Replies: 1
Views: 21

7th edition 5I.13 Part C

Question 5I.13 Part C asks whether the Cl2->2Cl or F2->2F reaction is more thermodynamically stable. How do we know which is more stable?
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:40 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: water
Replies: 4
Views: 54

Re: water

The double arrows represent equilibrium reactions.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:37 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding
Replies: 3
Views: 55

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

In hydrogen bonding, the N, O, and F on one molecule form a bond with the H on another molecule, so there needs to be an H bonded to N, O, or F for the molecule to have hydrogen bonding IMF's. For example, in a molecule with an O-H bond, it is polar, so when another O-H bond nearby will have its H t...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:32 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: H Bonds stronger than dipole-dipole
Replies: 2
Views: 207

Re: H Bonds stronger than dipole-dipole

A hydrogen bond is about 10% of the typical covalent bond strength, making it a much stronger attractive force than dipole-dipole and london dispersion.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Dec 02, 2018 9:38 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Drawing Chelates
Replies: 1
Views: 36

Re: Drawing Chelates

You would draw the normal shape of the ligand that is a chelate, and then the lone pairs would bond to the central metal atom, forming a ring.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Dec 02, 2018 9:29 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: HW 7th edition 6B.9
Replies: 3
Views: 48

HW 7th edition 6B.9

For 6B.9 part a row i and ii, we are given a chart giving just the [H3O+] for i and [OH-] for ii and we have to find the pH, pOH, [H3O+], and [OH-]. For i, we are given [H3O+] = 1.50M. If we use the formula pH = -log[H3O+], then we get a negative pH, and the same goes for using pOH = -log[OH-] in ii...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Dec 02, 2018 9:21 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: HW 7th edition 6A.17
Replies: 1
Views: 26

HW 7th edition 6A.17

Can someone please explain c and d of 6A.17? It says to state whether As2O3 and Bi2O3 are acidic, basic, or amphoteric. Why are they amphoteric?
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Nov 24, 2018 3:33 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Specific steps for 2.45 7th Ed.
Replies: 1
Views: 35

Re: Specific steps for 2.45 7th Ed.

For part a, there are three trigonal planar shapes connected by each carbon atom. For part b, you must look at the hybridization of each atom to determine what kind of bond is used. For the C-H bonds, C is 2sp2 hybridized and H is just a 1s orbital, so it is a sigma bond. For the C=C bond, both C's ...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Nov 24, 2018 3:23 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Shape of BF3
Replies: 1
Views: 20

Re: Shape of BF3

If you look at the valence electrons of B and F, Boron has 3 valence electrons and Fluorine has 3(7) valence electrons, totaling 24 total electrons to use in your lewis structure. If you use 6 electrons for B-F bonds, then you have 18 left over. F won't be stable unless it has a complete octet, so y...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Nov 24, 2018 1:38 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Slightly less than bond angles
Replies: 4
Views: 42

Re: Slightly less than bond angles

You would just say slightly less than what the normal bond angle is.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:43 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Determining a Dipole Moment
Replies: 2
Views: 33

Determining a Dipole Moment

I am confused on what is used to determine whether an atom is positively or negatively charged in a dipole moment. Is it related to formal charge?
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:36 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma and Pi bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Re: Sigma and Pi bonds

Pi bonds do not allow atoms to rotate as well. If the atoms rotate, the pi bonds will easily break. However, sigma bonds do allow the atoms to rotate.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:21 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR Shapes
Replies: 4
Views: 54

Re: VSEPR Shapes

An atom is trigonal pyramidal if it has four areas of electron density but only has three bonding electron pairs, or AX3E. An atom is t-shape if it has five areas of electron density but only has four bonding electron pairs, or AX3E2.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Nov 11, 2018 2:56 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Formal charges
Replies: 15
Views: 149

Re: Formal charges

If we disregard the formal charges when drawing our lewis structure will it be wrong? It could possibly be wrong if there is a better lewis structure that will give the most atoms a formal charge of zero, or if an atom that is not as electronegative as another has a negative formal charge. It would...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Nov 11, 2018 2:53 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Bond length
Replies: 3
Views: 78

Re: Bond length

Bond length also affects the dissociation energy, or the energy required to break a bond. Single bonds require less energy to break than double or triple bonds.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Nov 11, 2018 2:39 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: molecular shapes
Replies: 13
Views: 134

Re: molecular shapes

We will probably be going more in depth and learning more this week.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:43 am
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Uncertainty principle question
Replies: 2
Views: 67

Re: Uncertainty principle question

The uncertainty would be twice the value of the difference in speed, so it would be 0.8 m/s.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:39 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Chemical Bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 72

Re: Chemical Bonds

Typically, when the electronegativity difference between the two atoms is greater than 2, an ionic bond forms. If the electronegativity difference is less than 1.5, it is a covalent bond. However, all ionic bonds have some covalent character.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:34 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Drawing orbitals
Replies: 4
Views: 80

Re: Drawing orbitals

The p orbitals have a shape with two lobes, and depending on whether it is px, py, or pz, you would draw the two lobes on the x axis for px, the y axis for py, and the z axis for pz.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Oct 27, 2018 6:48 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Lowest Energy
Replies: 4
Views: 37

Re: Lowest Energy

Lowest energy does not have to do with ground state. Lowest energy is when all of the electrons are most stable, so when the octet of valence electrons is filled. This is only ground state for noble gases.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Oct 27, 2018 6:30 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: ionization energy [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 47

Re: ionization energy [ENDORSED]

The further away an electron is away from the nucleus, the easier it is to remove. Once the electron that is furthest away from the nucleus is removed, the next farthest would be removed. However, this electron is closer to the atom than the first electron, making it harder to remove, and increasing...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Oct 27, 2018 6:28 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Electron Configuration
Replies: 4
Views: 65

Re: Electron Configuration

S, p, d, and f orbitals all have an angular momentum number (l) associated with it.
For s, l=0
For p, l=1
For d, l=2
For f, l=3
And so on. The l is a subshell, so each energy level (n) has different subshells that are allowed, giving you the s, p, d, and f orbitals.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Oct 20, 2018 5:48 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wavelengths and frequencies
Replies: 10
Views: 94

Re: Wavelengths and frequencies

I don't think we need to know specific wavelengths, but we do have to know the order from longest to shortest wavelengths.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Oct 20, 2018 5:40 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Homework question
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Re: Homework question

You must calculate the threshold energy of the photon using the equation: E=h(frequency). They give you the frequency and h is a constant, therefore you can calculate the threshold energy of the photon.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Oct 20, 2018 5:37 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Symmetric vs. Non symmetric orbitals
Replies: 4
Views: 85

Re: Symmetric vs. Non symmetric orbitals

S-orbitals do not have nodal planes, so they have even electron density distribution, making the shell symmetric. Every other orbital has at least one nodal plane, meaning there is zero electron density distribution and making the shell not symmetric. This explains why the p-orbitals have a dumbbell...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Oct 14, 2018 1:33 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Quantum World 1.43
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Re: Quantum World 1.43

The Heisenberg Equation is (delta p, the uncertainty of momentum) times (delta x, the uncertainty of position) is greater than or equal to 0.5 times h/2pi.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Oct 14, 2018 1:29 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Threshold energy [ENDORSED]
Replies: 17
Views: 281

Re: Threshold energy [ENDORSED]

When I went to a workshop the UA described the energy in the light like a glass of water. In the glass, the water is the energy needed to remove an electron, the threshold energy. The extra volume of the glass above the water is the kinetic energy that is given to the electron.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sun Oct 14, 2018 1:18 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Photoelectric Experiment
Replies: 9
Views: 79

Re: Photoelectric Experiment

The energy of the photon must be greater than or equal to the energy to remove an electron. Light sources with long wavelengths have a lower frequency. The lower frequency does not have enough energy to remove an electron, even if it has high intensity. Intensity is also the amplitude of the wave. T...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Oct 06, 2018 7:56 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: homework problem F9
Replies: 3
Views: 53

Re: homework problem F9

You divide the percentages by the molar mass of each element. For example, divide 63.15g C by 12.01 g/mol.
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Oct 06, 2018 5:26 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Chem Mod Empirical and Molecular Formulas Problem 22
Replies: 1
Views: 29

Chem Mod Empirical and Molecular Formulas Problem 22

I did the chem module for empirical and molecular formulas and I was having trouble on problem 19. I calculated the moles of each element: for C I got 3.283 moles, for O I got 3.286 moles, and for H I got 7.802 moles. So, I got a ratio of 1:1:2.38. I figured I would multiply by 3 to get 3:3:7, but t...
by Kathryn Wilhem 1I
Sat Oct 06, 2018 4:49 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Chem Mod Limiting Reactants
Replies: 2
Views: 46

Chem Mod Limiting Reactants

I did the module for limiting reactants, and I kept getting confused on problems 30, 32, and 33. These were the problems with the formula 2A + 1B --> 3C. For 30, the question is If you have 1 mole A and 1 mole B, which is the limiting reactant? Wouldn't B be the limiting reactant because there are l...

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