Search found 43 matches

by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Dec 08, 2018 5:41 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: 6th edition 12.17
Replies: 5
Views: 103

Re: 6th edition 12.17

A metal hydroxide is generally basic, which is why BaO is basic. SO3 is acidic because a nonmetal oxide is generally acidic.
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Dec 08, 2018 9:10 am
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: J5 Sixth Edition
Replies: 1
Views: 86

Re: J5 Sixth Edition

H3O+ and H+ are the same thing, H+ is just a shorthand for H3O+!
by Elena Saab 4A
Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:00 am
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: (6th Edition) #12.49
Replies: 1
Views: 42

Re: (6th Edition) #12.49

I had the same question. I know that a weaker acid has a stronger conjugate base (and vice versa) but I was not able to figure out the structure of Morphine. I read in the Textbook that molecules with higher oxidation numbers are stronger acids, so if that applies I imagine BrO is a stronger base. H...
by Elena Saab 4A
Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:57 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals
Replies: 3
Views: 248

Re: Orbitals

What values are you referring to?
by Elena Saab 4A
Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:56 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted v. Lewis
Replies: 1
Views: 52

Bronsted v. Lewis

What is an example of a Lewis acid that is not a Bronsted? (or a base)
by Elena Saab 4A
Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:55 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Naming of acids
Replies: 2
Views: 95

Re: Naming of acids

I think you should be familiar with the more common names from my understanding.
by Elena Saab 4A
Sun Dec 02, 2018 5:40 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted v. Lewis v. Arrhenius
Replies: 4
Views: 119

Re: Bronsted v. Lewis v. Arrhenius

A Lewis acid accepts an electron pair, while a Bronsted acid donates a proton. A Lewis base donates an electron pair, and a Bronsted base accepts a proton.
Every Bronsted base is a Lewis base, but not every Lewis base is a Bronsted base.
Good luck!
by Elena Saab 4A
Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:17 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: J15
Replies: 2
Views: 95

J15

Homework question J15 asks for the chemical equation of a proton transfer of a cation or anion with water
For example, a) NaC6H5O
How do you write this equation? The answer in the back of the book doesn't include Na in any part of the equation either.
by Elena Saab 4A
Thu Nov 29, 2018 10:01 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelating Ligands
Replies: 1
Views: 54

Chelating Ligands

How do you tell if a ligand will form a chelate? What does it mean to be a chelate?
by Elena Saab 4A
Tue Nov 27, 2018 2:09 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Homework hybrid orbitals
Replies: 1
Views: 69

Re: Homework hybrid orbitals

The s character is the proportion of the hybridized orbital that is s. A hybridized orbital is like an average of the types of orbitals that make it up, so an sp2 hybridized orbital has less s character than an sp orbital. As the s-character increases, the angle also increases. Hope this helps!
by Elena Saab 4A
Tue Nov 27, 2018 2:07 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: pi bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 92

Re: pi bonds

If you have an sp2 hybridized orbital, there is one p orbital left that is not hybridized. When you are filling electrons into the orbitals, the energy difference between sp2 and p is very small (because you can think of sp2 as an average of s and 2 p orbitals), so it is more energy favorable for th...
by Elena Saab 4A
Tue Nov 27, 2018 10:03 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: ligands and dentates
Replies: 3
Views: 89

Re: ligands and dentates

A ligand is any electron rich species that forms 1 or more bonds with a cation. A mono dentate bonds with a cation at 1 site, so it donates 1 electron pair. A Bidentate bonds at 2 sites, and donates 2 electron pairs. A tridentate bonds at 3 sites, and a hexadendate bonds at 6 sites.
by Elena Saab 4A
Fri Nov 23, 2018 5:40 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: 6th Edition 4.29
Replies: 2
Views: 119

Re: 6th Edition 4.29

The first 2 structures are both polar because the Chlorine are very electronegative and would pull the dipole moments heavily towards the side they are on. In the third structure, the Chlorines are placed opposite each other and cancelling each other's dipole moment.
by Elena Saab 4A
Fri Nov 23, 2018 5:38 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structure to 3D
Replies: 3
Views: 119

Re: Lewis Structure to 3D

I think that 2 of the Hydrogen would be connected with a wedged line, and 2 with a dotted line. I imagine that the Nitrogens would be connected on the same plane.
by Elena Saab 4A
Fri Nov 23, 2018 5:35 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Drawing bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 110

Re: Drawing bonds

I don't think you will have to draw a sigma or pi bond, but you should know how they look on the internuclear axis. Sigma bonds are bonded directly on the axis, and pi bonds are bonded above/below the axis. Therefore, sigma bonds are moveable and can rotate, but pi bonds cannot rotate.
by Elena Saab 4A
Fri Nov 23, 2018 5:32 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Can the electronegativities of central/non-central atoms affect the bond angle?
Replies: 2
Views: 85

Re: Can the electronegativities of central/non-central atoms affect the bond angle?

I think that if there are no lone pairs, the bond angle would be equal. It might slightly change with lone pairs, but not dramatically. However, this does help clarify polarity/dipole moments!
by Elena Saab 4A
Tue Nov 13, 2018 3:09 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Electron Density
Replies: 2
Views: 49

Re: Electron Density

You must also consider lone pairs that change the angles between atoms surrounding the central atom.
by Elena Saab 4A
Tue Nov 13, 2018 3:08 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Rule 3 of the VSPER model
Replies: 1
Views: 44

Re: Rule 3 of the VSPER model

The lone pairs on the central atom determine the angles between the surrounding atoms. So technically, you do need to consider the position of the lone pairs, even though the shape is determined by the atoms.
by Elena Saab 4A
Tue Nov 13, 2018 3:02 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Rule 2 of VSEPR Model
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Re: Rule 2 of VSEPR Model

This rule means that when determine molecular structure, a single-, double-, and triple- bond all are treated as the same number of electronic region (1 region each). A double-bond is not considered 2 regions of density when determining shape.
by Elena Saab 4A
Sun Nov 11, 2018 6:28 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Bonding
Replies: 3
Views: 75

Re: Bonding

I believe that these attractions have minor differences, but we will consider them equal in this class.
by Elena Saab 4A
Fri Nov 09, 2018 1:01 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octet vs formal charge
Replies: 16
Views: 627

Re: Octet vs formal charge

Is formal charge also more important than having resonance structure? How much does resonance affect stability?
by Elena Saab 4A
Fri Nov 09, 2018 12:57 pm
Forum: Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Topic: Coordinate Covalent Bond Definition
Replies: 3
Views: 650

Re: Coordinate Covalent Bond Definition

How can you tell if a molecule has a coordinate covalent bond? Can you differentiate by the Lewis structure?
by Elena Saab 4A
Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:57 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Expanded Octet
Replies: 4
Views: 99

Expanded Octet

Are the atoms in the middle of a molecule generally the atoms with an expanded octet (rather than atoms on the periphery)? For example, in ICl4^-, even though it would make more sense for one of the Chlorine atoms to hold the negative charge because it is more electronegative than Iodine, the Iodine...
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Nov 03, 2018 1:05 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Expanded Octet of Terminal Atoms
Replies: 1
Views: 47

Re: Expanded Octet of Terminal Atoms

From my understanding, they should be able to have an expanded octet as long as they are in at least the third period.
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Nov 03, 2018 1:04 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Calculation of bond length
Replies: 3
Views: 88

Re: Calculation of bond length

The resonance bond length is around the average of the bonds that compromise it. I don't think at our level we can know exactly the bond length.
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Nov 03, 2018 1:02 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Midterm Question about Central Atom in Lewis Structure
Replies: 1
Views: 34

Re: Midterm Question about Central Atom in Lewis Structure

I believe that is the general rule, so yes!
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Oct 27, 2018 3:34 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: determining which bonds are in a molecule
Replies: 4
Views: 180

Re: determining which bonds are in a molecule

Yes, you also have to write out lewis structures to determine if bonds are single, double, or triple- and then showing sigma versus pi bonds!
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Oct 27, 2018 3:32 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma v. Pi
Replies: 6
Views: 217

Re: Sigma v. Pi

Additionally, a sigma bond is a direct overlap over the nuclear axis, whereas a pi bond is an overlap above/below that axis.
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Oct 27, 2018 3:32 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Homework 2B.21
Replies: 3
Views: 95

Re: Homework 2B.21

Additionally, if you write out both structures and calculate the formal charge (whichever has a 0 formal charge). The molecule with zero formal charge is the most stable structure, which is why it would be more likely to exist.
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Oct 27, 2018 3:25 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: electron affinity 1F.11
Replies: 3
Views: 126

Re: electron affinity 1F.11

Although I do not know if this is definitively why... I imagine that Be and Mg have equal ionization energies because both of their s shells are filled fully with 2 electrons. However this would not apply to Ga and In, but maybe because they only have 1 electron each in their valence shell (p), so i...
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Oct 20, 2018 1:11 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: energy emission
Replies: 1
Views: 55

energy emission

In the atomic spectroscopy module, there is a true or false question:
The energy of an atom is increased when electromagnetic radiation is emitted from it?

The correct answer is false, does this mean the magnitude of the energy becomes lower, or the energy becomes more negative?
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Oct 20, 2018 11:11 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Oil Drop Experiment
Replies: 2
Views: 95

Re: Oil Drop Experiment

This is also confusing me. I think naturally oil is not charged so the experimenters must have altered it manually?
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Oct 20, 2018 11:09 am
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Spectroscopy experimenting
Replies: 4
Views: 134

Re: Spectroscopy experimenting

I believe that if the energy of the photon = the threshold frequency, there is enough energy to remove an electron but not enough to give it a velocity. however, if the energy of the photon is greater than the frequency, the electron would have kinetic energy.
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Oct 20, 2018 11:07 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 6th Edition: Problem 1.9
Replies: 3
Views: 73

Re: 6th Edition: Problem 1.9

You can determine the event by the frequency, wavelength, and energy based on a chart earlier in the chapter. I don't think that you will have to know these numbers, but you should know the range of visible light (400 nm to 700 nm).
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Oct 13, 2018 6:51 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Rydberg constant
Replies: 7
Views: 196

Re: Rydberg constant

You use the Rydberg constant when you are solving for the energy change when an electron changes energy levels.
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Oct 13, 2018 6:50 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Module #28
Replies: 1
Views: 31

Re: Photoelectric Effect Module #28

a. Kinetic energy= 1/2(mv^2), and the mass of an electron is 9.109x10^-31 kg. b. I believe the energy here required to to remove 1 sodium electron would be equal to the work function. c. the Energy of the photon = work function + kinetic energy. If you find the energy, you also know that E=hv, (v=fr...
by Elena Saab 4A
Sat Oct 13, 2018 6:44 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Work Function
Replies: 4
Views: 84

Re: Work Function

I believe you would need to know either the threshold frequency or the velocity to answer this type of problem.
by Elena Saab 4A
Wed Oct 10, 2018 5:00 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Homework Question 1A15
Replies: 3
Views: 86

Re: Homework Question 1A15

Since you know that it is part of the Lymann series (because it is a Hydrogen in the UV spectrum), you can fill in that the final n value is n=1. Then, you can plug that into the equation (frequency= Rydberg's constant((1/final n^2)-(1/initial n^2) and solve!
by Elena Saab 4A
Sun Oct 07, 2018 5:11 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Chem Mod Limiting Reactants
Replies: 2
Views: 75

Re: Chem Mod Limiting Reactants

For Q30, A would be the limiting reactant because for every 1 mole of B being used, 2 moles of A are required.
For Q32, B would be in excess because all of A cannot use up all of B (because it is limiting).
I am also lost on question 33, sorry!
by Elena Saab 4A
Sun Oct 07, 2018 5:08 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Module 3 Question
Replies: 3
Views: 81

Re: Module 3 Question

No, because the law of conservation of mass. Additionally, that is why the percent yield will never be over 100%!
by Elena Saab 4A
Fri Oct 05, 2018 10:18 am
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Balancing reactions tips
Replies: 29
Views: 898

Re: Balancing reactions tips

What helps me the most is to first balance the elements that occur the least, and then I move on to elements other than Oxygen and Hydrogen. I save elements that are not combined with anything other than itself for last!
by Elena Saab 4A
Mon Oct 01, 2018 12:13 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Question G25 in 6th edition [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 84

Question G25 in 6th edition [ENDORSED]

Question G25 in the sixth edition asks how many molecules of substance X are left after diluting a solution 90 times. What kind of equation can you set up to solve this?
by Elena Saab 4A
Mon Oct 01, 2018 12:08 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Question G13 page F59 7th edition [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 55

Re: Question G13 page F59 7th edition [ENDORSED]

Once you have the moles in the new solution (.05 mol), you need to multiply by the mole ratio of (2 moles N)/(1 mole NH4NO3)to find the moles of Nitrogen. Hope this helps!

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