Search found 66 matches

by 305113590
Sun Mar 17, 2019 3:43 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: Van't hoff
Replies: 2
Views: 230

Re: Van't hoff

You must set -RTlnK equal to ∆H-T∆S. Then you just need to divide the -RT to the other side such that you only have link on one side
by 305113590
Fri Mar 15, 2019 3:49 am
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: activation energy
Replies: 3
Views: 61

Re: activation energy

Because we know that K=Ae^(-Ea/RT), we could derive it in such way that we can find the slope of the activation energy linearly.

We can receive the equation attached to this post. We plug in our rate constants and the initial and final temperatures such that we can receive our Ea
by 305113590
Fri Mar 15, 2019 3:35 am
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Steady-state
Replies: 1
Views: 52

Re: Steady-state

Lavelle mentioned how the steady-state approach Is arduous and how the pre-equilibrium approach accomplishes the same thing. So you should be fine just knowing the latter method.
by 305113590
Fri Mar 15, 2019 3:33 am
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Kinetics v. Thermodynamics
Replies: 1
Views: 168

Kinetics v. Thermodynamics

What distinguishes the difference between kinetic stability and thermodynamic stability? If you could relate it to activation energy and ∆G value (negative or positive), I would appreciate it.
by 305113590
Sat Mar 09, 2019 4:03 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: 15.101 6th Edition
Replies: 1
Views: 49

15.101 6th Edition

Why isn't the rate for this (k2•k1/k1')([ClO-][H2O][I-]/[OH-]). The answer key didn't include [H2O]. Is it because it is a catalyst? If so, does that idea apply to all rate laws?
by 305113590
Sat Mar 09, 2019 3:52 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Formula 15.23
Replies: 2
Views: 50

Re: Formula 15.23

This is just stoichiometry. I think of it as this: since the concentration of B rises to 0.034M, I convert that into A using stoichiometry. 0.034(2mol A)=0.068M of A. What this means was that for the concentration of B to increase, 0.068M of A had to be used. Hence, 0.068M of A was lost from the ini...
by 305113590
Sat Mar 09, 2019 3:41 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: 14.97
Replies: 2
Views: 61

Re: 14.97

This question is unique because this is an acid-base reaction. Hence we know that for this question, the weak acid will donate an electron: HF<--->H+(aq) + F-(aq) This means that the Ka= [H+][F-]/[HF]. Because the half reactions must adhere to this acid base reaction, the Ecell value is negative, -0...
by 305113590
Sun Mar 03, 2019 5:26 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Rate Determining Step
Replies: 9
Views: 282

Rate Determining Step

How do we write a rate equation when there is a rate determining step along with several fast elementary steps?
by 305113590
Sun Mar 03, 2019 5:19 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Kinetics
Replies: 7
Views: 120

Kinetics

Why is it that we need to know derivatives and slopes at particular points in kinetics? Are those values calculated or more theoretical?
by 305113590
Sun Mar 03, 2019 5:13 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Cell with all-solid species
Replies: 1
Views: 47

Re: Cell with all-solid species

If that is the case, I believe you would have to include a salt into the cell diagram onto the oxidation side (i.e. KOH) in order for ions to transfer and neutralize the charges. There was a homework problem like that, Chapter 14.15 in the 6th Edition. Cd(s) + 2Ni(OH)3(s) --->Cd(OH)2(s) + 2Ni(OH)2(s...
by 305113590
Sun Feb 24, 2019 2:20 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Homework Question
Replies: 2
Views: 107

Homework Question

What range in volts does a voltmeter need to have to measure pH in the range of 1 to 14 at 25 Celsius if the voltage is zero when pH is 7? I understand everything for the most part, but can anyone explain to me why we have to do this: .025693ln(0.1/1x10^-13)= 0.710V .025693ln(1x10^-14/1.0)=-0.828V W...
by 305113590
Sat Feb 23, 2019 8:08 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 6th Edition 14.15
Replies: 1
Views: 43

6th Edition 14.15

For part a, the equation is given as AgBr(s)<---->Ag+(aq)+Br-(aq).
How do we figure out what the half reactions are? I'm confused and need help.
Or in general, do we need to memorize/understand certain half reactions?
by 305113590
Sat Feb 23, 2019 6:13 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Cell Diagrams (Electrodes)
Replies: 1
Views: 49

Cell Diagrams (Electrodes)

When do we use electrodes (e.g. Pt(s)) for cell diagrams? And why must it be inert?
by 305113590
Sun Feb 17, 2019 6:30 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Enthalpy and graphs
Replies: 2
Views: 71

Re: Enthalpy and graphs

If I am referring to the right graph, the flat line is under irreversible, isobaric(constant pressure) conditions where it is defined by w=-P∆V. Lavelle always refers to their being a pin in a piston and once he releases that piston, there is a rapid work of expansion being performed. This is what m...
by 305113590
Sun Feb 17, 2019 6:20 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: q=0
Replies: 4
Views: 120

Re: q=0

Yes, this is because since temperature is constant. The equations, C∆T and mC∆T have a change in temperature, but adiabatic is constant temperature. Therefore ∆U only is dependent on work of expansion, w.
by 305113590
Sun Feb 17, 2019 6:15 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Activation energy
Replies: 8
Views: 175

Re: Activation energy

Essentially, activation energy is the energy required for a reaction to proceed. For example, when you need to strike a match, you need a certain amount of energy in order for the match to be lit. Kinetics is related to how the activation energy changes as a result of a catalyst, temperature, concen...
by 305113590
Sun Feb 10, 2019 9:46 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: DeltaU=q+w
Replies: 5
Views: 80

Re: DeltaU=q+w

Both q and w are considered to be change already. Since heat is flowing between the system and surroundings, there is already a change in heat being transferred/absorbed/released. Same applies for work. Work is a broad term, but it's the merely the idea that something is capable of doing stuff. When...
by 305113590
Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:54 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Degeneracy
Replies: 4
Views: 93

Degeneracy

Why is it that SO2F2 have 6 possible orientation/microstates, but FClO3 have 4 possible orientations? Is there a method to determine this number?
by 305113590
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:16 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: heat of a phase change
Replies: 5
Views: 106

Re: heat of a phase change

There are three places where temperature increases (solids, liquids, and gases). These places where temperature increases utilizes mC∆T where C is the specific heat capacity for water at a certain phase. Then, there are places where temperature does not change and they are phase changes (melting and...
by 305113590
Sun Feb 03, 2019 6:20 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: PV=nRT
Replies: 5
Views: 136

PV=nRT

When can we use PV=nRT and in what conditions? And what is the difference between PV=nRT and P∆V=∆nRT?
by 305113590
Sun Feb 03, 2019 6:07 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Delta U
Replies: 7
Views: 138

Delta U

What does a negative and positive delta U value tell us?
by 305113590
Fri Feb 01, 2019 10:52 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 6th Edition 8.73
Replies: 2
Views: 68

6th Edition 8.73

Use the bond enthalpies in Tables 8.6 and 8.7 to estimate the reaction enthalpy for: CH4(g)+4Cl2(g)--->CCl4(g)+4HCl(g). Can someone break down this step for me? I did 4(412)+4(0) - 4(338)- 4(431)=-1428 kJ/mol. However, when I accounted for Cl2(g) being 242kJ/mol, I got the textbook answer of -460 kJ...
by 305113590
Sun Jan 27, 2019 11:51 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Phase Changes
Replies: 7
Views: 118

Re: Phase Changes

Melting is considered endothermic because heat is required to break the bonds in the solid ice to become liquid water. In a similar vein, heat is required to break the bonds in the liquid water to become gaseous particles. Both processes require an input of energy to allow the molecules to reach a m...
by 305113590
Sun Jan 27, 2019 11:47 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: 3 Methods
Replies: 3
Views: 92

3 Methods

Was there a reason to know all three methods? Why should one be used than another?
by 305113590
Sun Jan 27, 2019 11:42 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Method 2 Example
Replies: 3
Views: 51

Re: Method 2 Example

To add, the bond enthalpy calculation process can lead to inaccuracies in enthalpy values. This is because bond energy between two atoms may be different depending on the bond length/angle. The only guaranteed enthalpy value is with diatomic molecules.
by 305113590
Sun Jan 20, 2019 4:23 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 11.57 6th edition
Replies: 1
Views: 20

Re: 11.57 6th edition

The pH is given after HClO2 reacted to reach equilibrium. Doing 10^-1.2 gives you the molarities at equilibrium. Hence, you must use an ICE box to create a Ka equation to find the Ka and pKa.
by 305113590
Sun Jan 20, 2019 4:16 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Calculating pH from weak base and its salt (ex. from class)
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Re: Calculating pH from weak base and its salt (ex. from class)

We use the salt, KNO2, to find the pH of nitrous acid. 1. Dissociate the 0.150M of KNO2, which are K+ and NO2-. Since it's a salt, we can use stoichiometry to find the molarity of NO2-. That will be NO2-. You use that to find the pH of nitrous acid. 2. Since HNO2 (nitrous acid) is weak, it'll underg...
by 305113590
Sun Jan 20, 2019 4:06 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Autoprotolysis
Replies: 4
Views: 257

Autoprotolysis

How does OH- and H3O+ appear to move faster than other ions? I don't understand its connection with autoprotolysis.
by 305113590
Sat Jan 12, 2019 8:20 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 6th Edition, 11.63
Replies: 1
Views: 47

6th Edition, 11.63

This question has a very small K value being 3.2x10^-34. When doing calculations, it results in this equation: (x^2)/(0.22-x)^2=3.2x10^-34. Since K is very small, could we assume that 0.22-x is 0.22 because the answer will be insignificantly different? This way, I could avoid the quadratic formula a...
by 305113590
Sat Jan 12, 2019 7:54 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE Tables
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: ICE Tables

C means the "Change" in a reaction. You will use stoichiometry to figure out these values.From the problems we've done in the textbook, we use "x" to define the change since we don't know the concentration difference from initial to equilibrium. Then, use products over reactants ...
by 305113590
Sat Jan 12, 2019 7:50 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Equilibrium constant
Replies: 4
Views: 55

Re: Equilibrium constant

What he means is that adding a product/reactant will eventually result in the product to reactant ratio to be the same as the equilibrium constant. This, hence, relates to changes in temperature, concentration, and pressure because these are temporary fluctuations in the reaction. The reaction will ...
by 305113590
Sat Jan 12, 2019 5:59 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Liquids and Solids
Replies: 3
Views: 37

Re: Liquids and Solids

Solids and liquids (pure substances) are incompressible and concentration don't change (or change very insignificantly) throughout the reaction. For example, pure water in the liquid or solid phase is 100% water and incompressible. Hence, water doesn't influence the reaction.
by 305113590
Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:33 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Kc Value
Replies: 4
Views: 109

Kc Value

What does a large Kc value mean besides being product or reactant favored? For example 10^7 versus 10^9. Does it have any relationship to kinetics or something else?
by 305113590
Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:59 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Boiling point
Replies: 4
Views: 289

Re: Boiling point

To add, boiling point can also increase with increased surface area, molecular weight, and amount of London Dispersion forces there are. More condensed and bunched up lewis structures contribute to lower boiling points than ones that are more spread out in a hydrocarbon chain.
by 305113590
Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:56 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: coordination compound shape
Replies: 3
Views: 246

Re: coordination compound shape

Shape is determined by the number of ligands that are attached to the metal ion/atom.
by 305113590
Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:18 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Examples
Replies: 5
Views: 237

Re: Examples

HSO3- is a good example since it can turn into both an acid or base.
by 305113590
Sun Dec 02, 2018 5:37 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Complex Ion
Replies: 1
Views: 45

Complex Ion

Do we have to remember the names of the metals when the complex ion is negative?
by 305113590
Sun Dec 02, 2018 5:30 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Compounds
Replies: 2
Views: 80

Coordination Compounds

How do we know when a coordination complex is a square planar or tetrahedral?
by 305113590
Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:10 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentate Ligand
Replies: 3
Views: 58

Re: Polydentate Ligand

We know when there are two or more places where a metal atom/ion can bind to the lone pairs of a ligand. You can definitely use Lewis Structures (3D dimensional analysis, too) to understand where the metal will bind.
by 305113590
Sun Nov 25, 2018 7:07 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angles
Replies: 2
Views: 79

Re: Bond Angles

When you compare a single bond to a double bond, multiple bonds (double and triple) have a higher electron density region. If you think of it as a small circle, a single bond only has a small circle which can influence around it, and double bonds have a larger circle and a triple bond would be even...
by 305113590
Sun Nov 25, 2018 5:21 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angles
Replies: 2
Views: 79

Bond Angles

Can someone tell me the bond angles for NO3- and S2O3^2-? I researched them and it says that the bond angles for NO3- is 120 and S2O3^2- is 109.5.
I thought bond angles change with double/triple bonds, but how come they aren't?
by 305113590
Sun Nov 25, 2018 1:20 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Bond Strengths
Replies: 1
Views: 65

Re: Bond Strengths

What it's basically saying is that the diatomic molecule has a certain amount of energy at a particular distance needed to break the molecule apart. All molecules have this optimal distance between each other that is really stable. At this optimal distance, the potential energy is at its lowest due ...
by 305113590
Sat Nov 24, 2018 10:22 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 4.81 Question
Replies: 1
Views: 35

4.81 Question

Borazine, B3N3H6, is a resonance structure that has alternating single and double bonds. This is because of the delocalization of electrons that contributes to the compound's stability. How would we know this without having prior knowledge of "aromaticity" in organic chemistry? My initial ...
by 305113590
Fri Nov 23, 2018 4:56 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structure to 3D
Replies: 3
Views: 115

Lewis Structure to 3D

Can someone draw how N2H4 (trigonal pyramidal) would look like with wedges and dotted lines? What would the bond angles be and why?
by 305113590
Sun Nov 18, 2018 8:20 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecular Shape
Replies: 4
Views: 93

Molecular Shape

Why does shape matter more than electron geometry? And a following question, how does this relate to hybridization?
by 305113590
Sun Nov 18, 2018 8:09 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Sigma/Pi bonds
Replies: 6
Views: 160

Sigma/Pi bonds

What exactly is the purpose of identifying sigma/pi bonds in molecules?
by 305113590
Sun Nov 18, 2018 8:06 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecules with more than 2 different elements
Replies: 3
Views: 79

Re: Molecules with more than 2 different elements

There isn't necessarily a rule for that, but you can identify many things, such as symmetry (symmetry=nonpolar, asymmetry=polar), electronegativity, and shape.
by 305113590
Sun Nov 11, 2018 4:11 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding Question
Replies: 3
Views: 56

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Question

Van der Waals are transient intermolecular forces, meaning that the interactions between molecules are temporary and do not last long. Van der Waals are found everywhere. Hydrogen bonds are a stronger intermolecular force because of the difference between electronegativities. For example, water has ...
by 305113590
Sun Nov 11, 2018 4:05 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Van der Waals vs Dispersion Forces
Replies: 8
Views: 171

Re: Van der Waals vs Dispersion Forces

The names of the two are synonymous (Van der Waals= London Disperson Forces). They are both intermolecular forces found everywhere. They occur when an electron cloud of one atom is heavily dense, while the other doesn't have a lot. This creates a temporary attraction between each other that are rela...
by 305113590
Sun Nov 11, 2018 3:58 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone Pairs
Replies: 7
Views: 133

Re: Lone Pairs

Yes it does because lone pairs want to be closer to the nucleus in comparison to a bonding pair. When this happens, the lone pairs take up more space due to the repulsion between each other. Hence, the geometric shape is important because it shows the shape that minimizes the repulsion between elect...
by 305113590
Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:22 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Alternative version of formula
Replies: 7
Views: 364

Re: Alternative version of formula

Yes, I use that same formula as well. The 1/2 part in the formula is just used to account for the bonds. Your formula works just the same.
by 305113590
Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:11 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Change in Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 289

Re: Change in Energy

When you go from a higher shell to a lower one (n=3 to n=1, Lyman series), then delta E is negative. Conversely, when it is the opposite way, then delta E is positive. I think it is essential to note this difference in sign because it tells you about the excitation of the atom. I did a practice prob...
by 305113590
Sun Nov 04, 2018 1:36 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge
Replies: 3
Views: 79

Formal Charge

Is it necessary to check if the Lewis structure is the best one by determining the formal charge of each atom? For example, when COCl2 has a double bond with oxygen and the rest have single bonds, then all formal charges equal 0. But when there is a double bond with Cl, then it begins to change. If ...
by 305113590
Sun Oct 28, 2018 1:42 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Smallest ionic radius [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 183

Re: Smallest ionic radius [ENDORSED]

Cl^2- because of the bigger proton count. Since they are isoelectronic (where they both achieve the noble gas configuration), you should look at which has more protons to attract the negatively charged electrons. This will, consequently, lead to a smaller radius.
by 305113590
Sun Oct 28, 2018 1:39 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: ionic vs. covalent bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 87

Re: ionic vs. covalent bonds

Ionic bonds are generally stronger than covalent bonds in non-aqueous environments because of the big difference in electronegativity between the metal and nonmetal, leading to the transfer of electrons towards the more electronegative atom (e.g. NaCl). Covalent bonds (polar and non polar) have less...
by 305113590
Sun Oct 28, 2018 1:27 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: F-block elements
Replies: 1
Views: 61

Re: F-block elements

This is because of the Aufbau principle, which basically states that the orbitals/numbers must go in numerical order in simple terms. Since Thorium is in the 5f orbital, it will not be included in the shorthand/noble electron configuration you have given.
by 305113590
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:10 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Atomic Orbitals
Replies: 3
Views: 81

Atomic Orbitals

What do the different orbitals (s, p, d, f) mean and its relationship with the periodic table? For example, n=3.
by 305113590
Sun Oct 21, 2018 2:06 am
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Delta E [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 53

Delta E [ENDORSED]

When a principal quantum level decreases down (e.g. n=4 to n=3, a Paschen series), how come the delta E would not become negative?
by 305113590
Sat Oct 20, 2018 3:12 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Atomic radius
Replies: 1
Views: 54

Re: Atomic radius

As you move from the bottom left to the upper right corner, the atomic radii decreases/becomes smaller. As you go up the group, the shelling effect decreases. Each shell decreases the attraction of the nucleus to the electrons. Going right across the period increases the proton number, thus increasi...
by 305113590
Sun Oct 14, 2018 5:01 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Purpose of the Photoelectric Effect
Replies: 4
Views: 56

Re: Purpose of the Photoelectric Effect

It demonstrated that the classical model was not working. Scientists thought that increasing amplitude would increase kinetic energy. However, it was light's frequency that increased kinetic energy. Long wavelength and high intensity light doesn't necessarily result in electron ejection.
by 305113590
Sun Oct 14, 2018 4:42 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: post assessment #28
Replies: 1
Views: 43

Re: post assessment #28

1 meter has 1,650,763.73 wavelengths. If you divide it, you will get 6. 0578x10^-7. This number means that in one wavelength (trough to trough) it is equivalent to 605.8nm. I do not think that energy was a variable to be considered in the problem. For part two of your question here is the math: c=λv...
by 305113590
Sat Oct 13, 2018 6:41 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Relationship with Equations
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Relationship with Equations

Can someone explain to me the relationship between the two equations E=hv and c=λv? How are they different?
by 305113590
Thu Oct 04, 2018 3:02 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Fundamental G, Number 5 6th Edition
Replies: 1
Views: 60

Fundamental G, Number 5 6th Edition

The solution manual was confusing for me to understand, so I did this. Is this a proper/viable way to solve it?
by 305113590
Thu Oct 04, 2018 2:26 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: H3, coefficients
Replies: 7
Views: 195

Re: H3, coefficients

According to one of the module questions we have done, chemical equations are a shorthand representation of chemical reactions. I believe that it is fine to keep your simplified version because it still demonstrates what is truly happening in the reaction.
by 305113590
Thu Oct 04, 2018 2:18 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Question 34 on Module 3 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 96

Re: Question 34 on Module 3 [ENDORSED]

1. Balance the equation. PCl3 + 3H20 --> 3HCl + H3PO3
2. Convert PCl3 to to moles. (23.6g)/(137.32g)= .172 mol of PCL3
3. Use stoichiometry .172 mol(3 mol HCL)= .516 mol HCL
4. Convert .515 mol HCl to grams. .516mol(36.46g)= 18.8g HCl

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