Search found 59 matches

by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Mar 17, 2019 11:02 am
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Arrhenius equation
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Re: Arrhenius equation

Being given the activation energy is a good hint to use it.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Mar 17, 2019 11:00 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Reducing Power
Replies: 3
Views: 68

Reducing Power

Why is it that the lower the standard reduction potential, the higher the reducing power, and the higher the standard reduction potential, the stronger the oxidizing agent? I believe that is the trend, if I'm not mistaken and I have that committed to memory but I don't understand why that is the cas...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:57 am
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Final
Replies: 5
Views: 64

Re: Final

There will probably be a higher emphasis on stuff after both the Midterm and Test 2, (kinetics especially) as those are topics we have yet to be tested on at all.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:54 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Inert Electrodes
Replies: 3
Views: 43

Re: Inert Electrodes

Thank you so much for your prompt reply, appreciate it!
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:51 am
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Saying Thank You to Dr. Lavelle
Replies: 200
Views: 45355

Re: Saying Thank You to Dr. Lavelle

Dr. Lavelle, I've been a freshman student in both your 14A and 14B class this year and I just wanted to say thank you so much for going above and beyond with the amount of effort you've poured into all of us making sure that we always have more resources than we could ever ask for and always seeming...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:47 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Inert Electrodes
Replies: 3
Views: 43

Inert Electrodes

Can we always use Platinum as an inert electrode for our cell diagrams when one is needed or are there others that must be used in certain cases?
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:45 am
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Easy ways to remember
Replies: 5
Views: 77

Re: Easy ways to remember

Also I don't have a mnemonic for it but be sure to remember the degeneracy equation (W=X^n) as I don't believe that one is given to us on our formula sheet.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:39 am
Forum: Second Order Reactions
Topic: Half Life for Second Order Reactions
Replies: 1
Views: 49

Half Life for Second Order Reactions

Why is it that for First Order Reactions the time required for the reaction to go to one fourth remaining is double the half life, but this is not true for second order reactions, as in problem 7B13 from the 7th edition?
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:37 am
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Wmax
Replies: 3
Views: 58

Re: Wmax

Wmax is directly proportional to the Gibbs free energy so it will be at its highest when Delta G is at its highest as well.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Mar 17, 2019 1:48 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Reducing power
Replies: 1
Views: 27

Re: Reducing power

Using standard reduction potentials. I believe a lower standard reduction potential indicates a higher reducing power and thus a higher standard reduction potential indicates a higher oxidizing power.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:42 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Question 9.19
Replies: 1
Views: 26

Re: Question 9.19

I believe you are heating the liquid water to its boiling point, vaporizing the liquid water at its boiling point into a gas , then cooling the gaseous to the desired temperature, while adding together the entropy for each of these separate stages. Though I can't be sure as I can't seem to find the ...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:37 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Inert Conductor
Replies: 3
Views: 28

Re: Inert Conductor

I believe in lecture he said that Mercury will only be used as an inert conductor if it present in the reaction initially but I"m not entirely sure, sorry. But I believe Platinum should be used if an inert conductor is needed unless Mercury is part of the reaction.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:35 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Solubility Product
Replies: 1
Views: 20

Re: Solubility Product

I don't believe the 5N section is part of our syllabus?
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:34 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Rate Constant
Replies: 1
Views: 23

Re: Rate Constant

The integrated rate laws for zero order, first order, and second order reactions all include the rate constant and time. The differential form of these rate laws expresses teh rate of reaction. And by substituting the final concentration for half the initial in the integrated rate laws, we can solve...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:30 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: using molarity vs moles
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: using molarity vs moles

Could you be more specific? What kind of a problem are you talking about?
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:26 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Catalyst in rate law?
Replies: 6
Views: 73

Re: Catalyst in rate law?

Well they aren't present in the final equation but are in the initial step so I suppose they could be in the rate law for one specific step but not the overall rate law? But I'm not sure honestly, sorry.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:24 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Determining catalysts
Replies: 2
Views: 23

Re: Determining catalysts

I believe you would use the definition of an intermediate and a catalyst to determine that. By definition, an intermediate is not present at the start or end of a reaction, it is created and used up within the process of the reaction. In this case none of the components fit that definition. On the c...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:09 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: neutral pH not 7?
Replies: 6
Views: 72

Re: neutral pH not 7?

pH 7 is neutral at STP but not for all temperatures as Kw is temperature dependent.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:52 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: HW problem
Replies: 2
Views: 81

Re: HW problem

It is not an intermediate as it is present at the beginning of the reaction. Intermediates are not present at the start or end of a reaction and are created and used up within the process of the reaction. HBrO is present at the beginning, thus making it a potential catalyst I believe.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:50 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Reduction Potentials
Replies: 2
Views: 22

Re: Reduction Potentials

Yes I believe that's true; you reverse a reaction in order to have the highest resulting cell potential when you add the two together.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:41 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Intermediates in Rate Law
Replies: 4
Views: 37

Re: Intermediates in Rate Law

No if something is an intermediate it is created and used up within the reaction steps and therefore I do not believe it should be present in a rate law.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:39 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Reducing/oxidizing power?
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: Reducing/oxidizing power?

I believe if something has a low reduction potential it has strong reducing power and a high reduction potential signifies strong oxidizing power.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:37 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Emf
Replies: 1
Views: 24

Re: Emf

It's Ecell sometimes written as E0cell
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:30 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Easy ways to remember
Replies: 5
Views: 77

Re: Easy ways to remember

LEO says GER for Redox reactions:
Losing Electrons = Oxidation
Gaining Electrons = Reduction
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 5:59 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 6M7 7th edition
Replies: 2
Views: 26

Re: 6M7 7th edition

You don't need to use an equation just compare standard reduction potentials.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 5:41 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 6L7 b 7th edition
Replies: 1
Views: 21

Re: 6L7 b 7th edition

There are two reactants in this equation, hydogen cation and hydroxide anion. Analyzing both their reduction potentials, we see that hydrogen cation has the stronger standard reduction potential, thus it must be reduced and the hydroxide reaction must be reversed and it must be oxidized. By balancin...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Mar 16, 2019 5:31 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 6L7 c 7th edition
Replies: 1
Views: 21

Re: 6L7 c 7th edition

Based on lecture, I believe it is because the goal of a cell diagram is to provide directions for how to conduct the described cell and to build that solid state cell hydroxide must be present in the form of a solid compound as the solid state cell could not be built using just aqueous hydroxide, bu...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Jan 13, 2019 6:21 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Different Concentrations [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 39

Re: Different Concentrations [ENDORSED]

You can convert between partial pressure and molar concentrations using the Ideal Gas Law:



by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Jan 13, 2019 6:17 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Definition of an Ideal Gas [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 43

Re: Definition of an Ideal Gas [ENDORSED]

An ideal gas is one which perfectly obeys the Ideal Gas Law: PV = nRT.
All collisions between molecules are elastic, kinetic energy and momentum are conserved, and the law is obeyed exactly, without any discrepancies.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Jan 13, 2019 6:15 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Pressure and Temperature [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 77

Re: Pressure and Temperature [ENDORSED]

Temperature is directly proportional to the average kinetic energy of molecules of a gas. By increasing the pressure these molecules are placed in a more compact setting, causing them to bounce off each other more frequently, and thus move faster. As these molecules move faster, the temperature incr...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:46 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Trend of Electronegativity
Replies: 12
Views: 285

Re: Trend of Electronegativity

Electronegativity increases as you go up the periodic table as the energy level is lower so electrons are held closer to the nucleus with lower atomic radii and an increased effective nuclear charge. As you go across the periodic table electronegativity also increases as the energy level remains the...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:59 am
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Cisplatin
Replies: 2
Views: 62

Re: Cisplatin

In cisplatin the molecule is organized so that both binding sites are on the same side of the molecule so it can bind twice to the same strand of DNA stopping cell division.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:20 am
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: konstant?
Replies: 1
Views: 37

Re: konstant?

Do you mean the equilibrium constant? That represents the ratio of products over reactants in a reaction at equilibrium.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:18 am
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Which salts produce which solutions
Replies: 1
Views: 54

Re: Which salts produce which solutions

Salts that contain the conjugate base of a weak acid will raise pH by removing protons from water to generate hydroxide. Sodium acetate is a good example of this.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:05 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 2E 7 7th edition
Replies: 1
Views: 51

Re: 2E 7 7th edition

The answer book is correct. The formula should be AX3E as there are three atoms bonded to the central atom, one oxygen atom and two chlorine atoms.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 12:49 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Quantum World, Test 2: SigFigs
Replies: 1
Views: 98

Re: Quantum World, Test 2: SigFigs

1 sig fig
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 12:47 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted acid
Replies: 4
Views: 87

Re: Bronsted acid

Because it donates a proton to become a stable anion (Br-)
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 12:46 am
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: Strong/weak acids and bases
Replies: 2
Views: 69

Re: Strong/weak acids and bases

I think he just wanted us to memorize them but generally speaking many strong acids are either polyprotic or the conjugate acid of a halogen anion (with HF being a notable exception).
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 12:45 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic vs.covalent bonding
Replies: 4
Views: 80

Re: Ionic vs.covalent bonding

Ionic bonding usually involves a metal cation and a non metal anion and a transference of charge.
Covalent bonding usually involves two nonmetal atoms and a sharing of electrons in a bond, (no charge only potential dipoles)
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 12:43 am
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Final
Replies: 2
Views: 75

Re: Final

Pages 490-491 in the 7th Edition have a small blurb on this.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 12:42 am
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Final
Replies: 2
Views: 75

Re: Final

I don't think you need to know anything specifically about acid rain just the concepts involved in that example from the book regarding the reaction of carbonic acid (or a similar strong acid) and water.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sun Dec 09, 2018 12:16 am
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Practice problem
Replies: 2
Views: 72

Re: Practice problem

The question focuses on using this quantum equation for hydrogen: E_{n}=\frac{hR_{h}}{n^2} Manipulating the equation with the information given, (the energy released as the electron went from one energy level to another) you get: E=\frac{hR_{h}}{n_{f}^2}-\frac{hR_{h}}{n_{i}^2} Where: E = The energy ...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:54 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybrid Orbitals
Replies: 1
Views: 35

Re: Hybrid Orbitals

It seems to be asking for they hybridization of the second carbon in the chain. That carbon is attached to two other carbons, the first in the chain with a single bond and the third with a triple bond. As such it has two regions of electron density and thus exhibits a hybridization of sp.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:51 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Amphoteric vs. Amphiprotic
Replies: 1
Views: 61

Re: Amphoteric vs. Amphiprotic

An amphoteric substance can act as either an acid or a base. An amphiprotic substance is a more specific type of amphoteric substance that can easily accept or donate hydrogen ions.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:43 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone pair locations
Replies: 1
Views: 48

Re: Lone pair locations

I would assume their orientation as in bond angles and shape and VSEPR formulas. How they would experience repulsion and orient themselves far apart from each other such as in a square planar shape.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:41 pm
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: practice problems?
Replies: 1
Views: 44

Re: practice problems?

There is an informational blurb with some example equations in section 6.E.4 on pages 490-491 of the seventh edition.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:38 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Can someone check if I'm right
Replies: 2
Views: 73

Re: Can someone check if I'm right

Keep in mind the hydronium ion has a 1+ charge as H30+ but yes that is correct. Also note that both HSO4- and H20 are amphoteric. But yes you are correct. :)
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:24 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizability vs. Polarizing Power
Replies: 2
Views: 93

Polarizability vs. Polarizing Power

What is the difference between polarizability and polarizing power?
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:05 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Seesaw and t shape angles
Replies: 2
Views: 54

Re: Seesaw and t shape angles

Less than 120, also in the case of T-Shape versus seesaw both sets of bonds you've referred to are less than 90 degrees but indicating which is specifically lower is not usually important as long as you state that they are each lower than 90.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:47 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Salt Solution pH — 7th Edition 6.D.11
Replies: 2
Views: 50

Re: Salt Solution pH — 7th Edition 6.D.11

You're right it would dissociate into the K+ and F- ions; however, F- is the conjugate base of hydofluoric acid, HF, which is a WEAK acid not a strong acid, and therefore does still affect pH.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:38 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Pi bonds
Replies: 1
Views: 50

Re: Pi bonds

I'm not sure but I believe that this is outside the scope of our course as it is from section 2.G.1 in the textbook and the entire 2.G section is absent from the syllabus.
by Ashish Verma 2I
Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:16 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Lewis Acid
Replies: 6
Views: 74

Re: Lewis Acid

Bromine is in Group 4 of the Periodic Table while Fluorine is in Group 2. Based on periodic trends and atomic mass, Bromine is a heavier atom with a much larger atomic radius. As such, the single bond in HBr is much longer than the single bond in HF. Longer bonds are weaker so hydrobromic acid has a...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Mon Oct 15, 2018 10:06 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Module
Replies: 3
Views: 85

Photoelectric Effect Module

I had a question about one of the parts of the Photoelectric Effect Module Post Assessment. Question 30 specifically. The given information is as follows: Light hits a sodium metal surface and the velocity of the ejected electron is 6.61 x 10^5 m/s. The work function for sodium is 150.6 kJ/mol. The ...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:28 pm
Forum: *Particle in a Box
Topic: Hw assignment?
Replies: 7
Views: 234

Re: Hw assignment?

I believe we are still on the quantum section for homework since we haven't covered anything further so we aren't prepared for homework on sections that have never been discussed in lecture. Also my TA allowed us to do homework from the high school chem review section for both Week 1 and Week 2 sinc...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:25 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: What the equation is used for
Replies: 5
Views: 81

Re: What the equation is used for

I'm confused as well and am not entirely sure but I think the equation is more conceptually used to prove that at this scale the means of measurement affects the outcome like Dr. Lavelle emphasized. I think it just proves that by measuring either momentum or distance of an electron in this type of a...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Fri Oct 05, 2018 5:17 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: diatomic elements
Replies: 12
Views: 438

Re: diatomic elements

One cheap mnemonic device to remember these is: Never Have Fear Of Ice CoLd Bread
Never: Nitrogen
Have: Hydrogen
Fear: Fluorine
Of: Oxygen
Ice: Iodine
CoLd: Chlorine
Bread: Bromine
by Ashish Verma 2I
Fri Oct 05, 2018 3:32 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: (Typo??) HW L.35 - 7th edition
Replies: 3
Views: 129

Re: (Typo??) HW L.35 - 7th edition

I have the seventh edition book and solutions manual and I had the exact same issue as you. My third equation in the book is also listed as FeBr_2+Na_2CO_3->NaBr+CO_2+Fe_3O_4 But since the solutions manual uses Fe_3Br_8 I'm assuming that's a typo like you said and just using that as the first reacta...
by Ashish Verma 2I
Fri Oct 05, 2018 1:55 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Significant Figures for E.21 (b)
Replies: 4
Views: 89

Significant Figures for E.21 (b)

Question E.21 (b) asks you to calculate the moles and number of molecules in 25.92 mg of hydrogen fluoride. I tried to solve the question but ended up getting an answer with the incorrect number of significant figures and I can't explain why: \frac{25.92 mg HF}{1}*\frac{1gHF}{1000mgHF}*\frac{1molHF}...

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