Search found 38 matches

by Germar G 4F
Thu Dec 06, 2018 4:22 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: OH2 vs H2O
Replies: 5
Views: 108

Re: OH2 vs H2O

Vy Lu 3A wrote:In some answers, H2O is written as OH2 because we want to emphasize that the oxygen atom in the water molecule is the partially negative part of the ligand that binds to the metal central atom in the coordination compound.

Got it, thank you!
by Germar G 4F
Thu Dec 06, 2018 4:16 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Amphiprotic vs Polyprotic
Replies: 1
Views: 43

Amphiprotic vs Polyprotic

Can someone explain the difference between these two?
by Germar G 4F
Wed Dec 05, 2018 6:14 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: OH2 vs H2O
Replies: 5
Views: 108

OH2 vs H2O

In some answers from the HW, for example 17.31 6th edition, they write H2O as OH2. Is there a reason for that? If so, when do we write it OH2?
by Germar G 4F
Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:33 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: NH3 vs H20
Replies: 1
Views: 66

NH3 vs H20

Not sure if this is the right topic/section to ask this question, but why is it that NH3 will displace H20 in a coordination compound?
by Germar G 4F
Mon Dec 03, 2018 8:49 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Ka calculations
Replies: 2
Views: 76

Ka calculations

Can someone explain why having a higher Ka makes a stronger acid?
by Germar G 4F
Mon Dec 03, 2018 8:36 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: ph vs pOH
Replies: 5
Views: 114

Re: ph vs pOH

pH measures the concentration of H+/H30+ concentration, while pOH measures the amount of OH-.
by Germar G 4F
Sun Dec 02, 2018 2:35 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Electronegativity
Replies: 2
Views: 84

Electronegativity

How does electronegativity affect the strength of an acid/base? I don't understand exactly why a higher electronegativity means a stronger acid. Can someone explain this please?
by Germar G 4F
Sun Dec 02, 2018 1:33 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Weak Acid/Base vs. Strong
Replies: 7
Views: 161

Re: Weak Acid/Base vs. Strong

The strength of an acid or base is defined by the extent of dissociation it has in water. So if it is completely dissociated, then it can be considered a strong base/acid. However, if it is partially dissociated, then it will be a weak acid/base.
by Germar G 4F
Sun Dec 02, 2018 1:23 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: More practice
Replies: 7
Views: 279

Re: More practice

MadisonB Lec 1 Dis 1K wrote:You could also look at the problems on past tests or previous review sessions.

where can you find these?
by Germar G 4F
Sun Dec 02, 2018 1:02 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Monodentates
Replies: 2
Views: 72

Monodentates

So if monodentates can only form one interaction with a metal ion, does this mean that in order for a molecule to be considered a monodentate ligand, it needs to have only 1 lone pair? Is this true for all monodentates?
by Germar G 4F
Wed Nov 28, 2018 5:11 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polar covalent vs. polar ionic bonds
Replies: 1
Views: 56

Re: Polar covalent vs. polar ionic bonds

Polar covalent bonds share electrons unequally which allow for partial charges to occur. An ion, however, forms ionic bonds, which involve the transfer of electrons, not sharing. Thus, ionic bonds can't have dipoles/partial charges like polar covalent bonds. They have a set charge. We don't really d...
by Germar G 4F
Tue Nov 27, 2018 11:47 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Week 7 Step Up WS Question D
Replies: 1
Views: 49

Re: Week 7 Step Up WS Question D

XeF2 is linear because every time you have 3 lone pairs on the central atom and 2 bonded pairs, it will result in a linear shape. (AX2E3) The three lone pairs on the central atom will equally space out around it, and will repel/push the bonded pairs into a linear structure.
by Germar G 4F
Tue Nov 27, 2018 11:38 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Polar Power
Replies: 5
Views: 112

Re: Polar Power

Polarizing power is basically an atom's ability to distort or effect an electron cloud around another atom. Ions have the highest polarizing power because they contain strong charges that have a high potential to distort other atoms. A smaller atomic radius means and a higher ion charge are usually ...
by Germar G 4F
Fri Nov 23, 2018 1:20 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: CH4 vs CCl4
Replies: 1
Views: 67

CH4 vs CCl4

Why does CH4 have a lower boiling point than CCl4? In other words, why is CCl4 more tightly held compared to CH4? What does the difference in amount of electrons have to do with boiling temperature?
by Germar G 4F
Fri Nov 23, 2018 1:04 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Relationship between atomic size and attractive forces
Replies: 2
Views: 88

Relationship between atomic size and attractive forces

Why is F2 a gas and I2 a solid at room temperature? Can someone explain why this is?
by Germar G 4F
Sun Nov 18, 2018 8:58 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Multiple different bond angles
Replies: 6
Views: 121

Re: Multiple different bond angles

TeCl4 has different bond angles because of its molecular geometry. It has seesaw geometry, since it has 4 single bonds and one lone pair. All seesaw geometries will have 90, 120, and 180 degree angles in their 3-D shape. If you look at a picture of "seesaw geometry" you can see each of the...
by Germar G 4F
Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:01 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polarity and Molecular Shape
Replies: 1
Views: 42

Polarity and Molecular Shape

How do you determine the polarity of a molecule from its molecular shape? What's an example of a non-polar molecular shape and a polar molecular shape?
by Germar G 4F
Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:53 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecular shape
Replies: 3
Views: 69

Re: Molecular shape

The shape of a molecule directly influences the strength of interactions by attractive/repulsive forces. Dr. Lavelle used the rod-shaped vs. spherical shape example in lecture, where the rod-shaped molecules have a stronger bond/higher boiling point because the dipole-dipole attractions were closer ...
by Germar G 4F
Sat Nov 10, 2018 5:39 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Shapes
Replies: 5
Views: 120

Re: Shapes

Yes, all molecules with four bonding pairs and no lone pairs will be tetrahedral.
by Germar G 4F
Sat Nov 10, 2018 5:34 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Relation between strong acid and weak bond
Replies: 3
Views: 79

Relation between strong acid and weak bond

When comparing bond strengths in lecture, Dr. Lavelle said that HI would be the strongest acid in comparison to HF, HCl, and HBr. Can someone explain why having the weakest bond means it will be a strong acid?
by Germar G 4F
Sat Nov 10, 2018 5:15 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Dissociation Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 110

Dissociation Energy

Why is the dissociation energy of a covalent bond, like N2, 932 kJ/mol and an ionic bond's, like NaCl, is -250 kJ/mol? (I wrote these down on my notes from the lecture). Since ionic bonds are stronger, wouldn't it have a much higher dissociation energy than N2? Why is it's dissociation energy negati...
by Germar G 4F
Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:45 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Molecule Shape
Replies: 8
Views: 228

Re: Molecule Shape

Lewis structures are a good starting point in finding the 3-D structure of a molecule, because they help us find an approximate location of binding e- and lone pair e-, which is what we need to determine the shape of a molecule (for example, if it's bent(H20) or linear (CO2)).
by Germar G 4F
Fri Nov 02, 2018 5:48 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Nodal planes
Replies: 6
Views: 323

Re: Nodal planes

The number of nodal planes in an orbital is equal to the value of the angular momentum quantum number (l).
by Germar G 4F
Fri Nov 02, 2018 5:26 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: s vs d orbital
Replies: 2
Views: 57

Re: s vs d orbital

This situation usually happens with Zn 2+. Since we want to avoid having two half-filled orbitals when there are 2 electrons that could be used in the outer 4s shell, we take the electrons from s2 and give them to d8, so that this way the orbital is at fully filled with electrons (d10).
by Germar G 4F
Fri Nov 02, 2018 5:06 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: How to decide central atom?
Replies: 6
Views: 144

Re: How to decide central atom?

The central atom is always the one with the lowest ionization energy/electronegativity. An easier way to tell which is the central atom, however, is by seeing which atom we have the least of. For example, for CH4 C would be in the middle since there is only one C atom.
by Germar G 4F
Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:17 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Cations/Anions
Replies: 4
Views: 74

Re: Cations/Anions

5p1 represents an electron. Since an electron is negatively charged, and with In+ you are losing an electron, taking away the 5p1 accomplishes that in electron configuration notation. Same concept applies to N: if it is N^-3, then making 5p3 to 5p6 represents the three electrons that are gained by N.
by Germar G 4F
Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:03 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Uncertainty Equation
Replies: 2
Views: 95

Re: Uncertainty Equation

If the momentum is large, meaning that the mass is large, then the wavelength will be more certain because a larger mass is obviously more noticeable than a smaller mass. Also, large objects like a baseball (speaking in relation to quantum world) have super small wavelengths and act more like a part...
by Germar G 4F
Sun Oct 28, 2018 10:32 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Difference Between Ionic and Covalent Bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 72

Re: Difference Between Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Main differences are that covalent bonds share electrons, while ionic bonds (being far too electronegative) transfer electrons, which results in two oppositely charged ions (creation of cations and anions). Covalent bonds are also between two non-metals and are relatively weaker than ionic bonds (ex...
by Germar G 4F
Sat Oct 20, 2018 9:58 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Coulomb's Law
Replies: 3
Views: 66

Re: Coulomb's Law

In lecture he said we would only need to know the concept behind it and that we wouldn't be doing any calculations (since multi-electron atoms are hard to work with).
by Germar G 4F
Sat Oct 20, 2018 9:51 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Test #2
Replies: 6
Views: 117

Re: Test #2

Yeah, my TA told us we would need to know the Rydberg's Equation for this test.
by Germar G 4F
Thu Oct 18, 2018 7:00 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Homework Problem 2.13
Replies: 1
Views: 38

Homework Problem 2.13

Can someone explain what "orientation of the lobes" means? Is it just the position of the shape relative to the x, y or z axes?
by Germar G 4F
Wed Oct 10, 2018 7:17 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Photons
Replies: 4
Views: 64

Re: Photons

Increasing the intensity of light helps does release more photons, but what matters is if each photon has enough energy to make an electron move. By changing the frequency, the energy of each photon is increased. So theoretically, there could be a situation where the light intensity is low, but the ...
by Germar G 4F
Wed Oct 10, 2018 7:08 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Work Function
Replies: 4
Views: 100

Re: Work Function

The "work function" of a metal is the least amount of energy it takes in order for an electron to be bounced from that specific metal. So think of it as the threshold frequency, except that it is referring to energy. So a photon must be equal or greater than the work function in order to m...
by Germar G 4F
Thu Oct 04, 2018 4:53 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Molecular Formulas
Replies: 5
Views: 166

Re: Molecular Formulas

This problem isn't asking you for the molecular formula, it's asking for the empirical formula. Note that they ask "In what atom ratios are the atoms present in vanillin?" implying that they are not looking for the exact amount of atoms in vanillin, but just the ratios. There is also no gi...
by Germar G 4F
Thu Oct 04, 2018 4:20 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: chemical formulas
Replies: 4
Views: 165

Re: chemical formulas

There is a list of diatomic elements, which means they get a subscript of 2 every time you write them in a chemical equation. The diatomic elements are Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Fluorine, Oxygen, Iodine, Chlorine, and Bromine. Remember them with this mnemonic:

Have No Fear Of Ice Cold Beer
by Germar G 4F
Thu Oct 04, 2018 4:09 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Homework Problems
Replies: 3
Views: 109

Re: Homework Problems

Yeah, you can pick any 7 from the list of problems under the first section "Chemical & Physical Principles" on the syllabus.
by Germar G 4F
Thu Oct 04, 2018 3:34 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Problem F.7
Replies: 4
Views: 111

Re: HW Problem F.7

Sorry guys, just realized this problem isn't even on the HW list. Wow lol. Anyway, thanks for the help!!
by Germar G 4F
Thu Oct 04, 2018 10:43 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Problem F.7
Replies: 4
Views: 111

Problem F.7

A metal M forms an oxide with the formula M2O, for which the mass percentage of the metal is 88.8%. (a) What is the molar mass of the metal? (b) Write the name of the compound. How would we go about to solve part a) of this problem? So far, I understand that the ratio of the mystery metal "M&qu...

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