Search found 72 matches

by Parth Mungra
Sat Mar 16, 2019 1:30 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Pseudo 1st order rate laws
Replies: 2
Views: 155

Re: Pseudo 1st order rate laws

the k value for the psuedo system will incorporate something similar to k=k1k2/k2, and these k1 and k2 come from the molecules in large excess.
by Parth Mungra
Sat Mar 16, 2019 1:28 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Relation between deltaG and E
Replies: 1
Views: 178

Re: Relation between deltaG and E

No, a positive E supports G being negative, as can be seen with the equation dG=-nfE
by Parth Mungra
Sat Mar 16, 2019 1:27 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: Not used Half life
Replies: 1
Views: 176

Re: Not used Half life

For zero order, there is no half life due to the integrated rate law not having concentration
by Parth Mungra
Sat Mar 16, 2019 1:25 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Ionic Dissociation
Replies: 1
Views: 39

Re: Ionic Dissociation

With this question, you have to use the vant hoff equation. The question gives the unknowns except for K. You can solve for K, and they put that back into the original balanced equation and solve for conc of h30+
by Parth Mungra
Sat Mar 16, 2019 1:24 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Drawing reaction profiles
Replies: 2
Views: 62

Re: Drawing reaction profiles

I think we would be asked to draw them in accordance to their steps, meaning a slow step will have a different looking trough than a fast step.
by Parth Mungra
Sat Mar 16, 2019 1:22 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Electrical Work & Free Energy
Replies: 1
Views: 36

Re: Electrical Work & Free Energy

Not always. wmax is refers to dG, as it is the maximum energy that is free to do work. Likewise, this is the same with cell potentials.
by Parth Mungra
Sat Mar 16, 2019 1:21 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Standard Conditions
Replies: 2
Views: 207

Re: Standard Conditions

No, standard conditions do not imply that only one electron is being transferred. You should complete the half reactions and see the moles of electrons transfered.
by Parth Mungra
Fri Mar 08, 2019 10:17 am
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Mechanism
Replies: 2
Views: 58

Mechanism

What is a mechanism? How does this affect the rate laws? Also, what can affect it?
by Parth Mungra
Fri Mar 08, 2019 10:16 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Water in a cell diagram
Replies: 5
Views: 93

Water in a cell diagram

Do you include water in a cell diagram? What is it is in a gas phase, do you then include it?
by Parth Mungra
Fri Mar 08, 2019 10:14 am
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: 15.3
Replies: 3
Views: 76

Re: 15.3

You do not need to work backward from part c. You can find the average change in rate (part a) by dividing the change in concentration by the change in time. Part B is asking about ratios of rates, which can be found by looking at stoich. coefficients. Thus, you can find part c based on these coeffi...
by Parth Mungra
Fri Mar 01, 2019 8:47 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Gas phase products
Replies: 3
Views: 60

Re: Gas phase products

The gas product will leave the solution (not all of it however, this is why the reverse reaction can still occur), and thus there is less product to react to form reactants
by Parth Mungra
Fri Mar 01, 2019 8:44 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: Units
Replies: 6
Views: 114

Units

What are the units for rate? Also, what are the units for the n or m values in the differential rate law?
by Parth Mungra
Fri Mar 01, 2019 8:42 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Unique rates
Replies: 5
Views: 94

Re: Unique rates

To build off that, we talk about the initial rate of the reactants going to the products only, and not the reverse reaction. This makes our analysis and our calculations nicer.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Feb 21, 2019 9:25 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Free Energy and Work Relationship
Replies: 2
Views: 56

Re: Free Energy and Work Relationship

dG= the maximum amount of work that can be done.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Feb 21, 2019 9:22 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Gibbs
Replies: 3
Views: 65

Re: Gibbs

Gibbs Free energy helps us calculate the energy that is free to do work after a certain process. This does not include the energy in between electrons or protons, but it is the energy that can be transferred to do, for example, expansion against a force.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Feb 21, 2019 9:19 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Work max and delta G
Replies: 2
Views: 51

Re: Work max and delta G

Remember that dG represents all the energy (from a process) that is free to do work. Essentially, this statement is saying that virtually all of the free energy calculated from the Gibbs Free Energy equation is available to do work (the maximum amount)
by Parth Mungra
Fri Feb 15, 2019 7:52 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: At Equilibrium G
Replies: 6
Views: 115

Re: At Equilibrium G

If K=0, then the reaction is neither spontaneous nor nonspontaneous
by Parth Mungra
Fri Feb 15, 2019 7:44 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Gibbs free energy
Replies: 7
Views: 111

Re: Gibbs free energy

You can look at the equation as well, dG=dH - TdS
If the entropy expression is greater than enthalpy, then the reaction will be spontaneous (exergonic), because dG is negative.
by Parth Mungra
Fri Feb 15, 2019 7:40 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Gibbs and Enthalpy
Replies: 4
Views: 75

Re: Gibbs and Enthalpy

Gibbs free energy represents the total energy that is 'free' after a reaction. The energy from electrons and electrostatic charges are not included in this 'free energy.' Free energy is energy that can be used to do work.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:58 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Thermodynamic Property
Replies: 1
Views: 63

Thermodynamic Property

In lecture, Dr. Lavelle said that the thermodynamic property resulted in a small error in entropy. What does thermodynamic property mean and how does it result in a small error in entropy when using Boltzmann's constant formula?
by Parth Mungra
Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:53 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Degeneracy
Replies: 4
Views: 111

Re: Degeneracy

X represents the number of locations that the atoms (the number of atoms is n) can be in.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:50 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: ΔH
Replies: 2
Views: 72

Re: ΔH

For most liquid and aqueous solutions (not gases) dU=dV=qp because there is no change in volume, and thus no change in expansion work. w=0 is when they are equal.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:38 am
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Heat Capacity
Replies: 5
Views: 84

Re: Heat Capacity

We want an intensive property because it can help us more with our specific experiments or reactions. We can divide the Heat capacity by the amount of substance in grams to get the specific heat capacity, which is an intensive property. We can also divide the heat capacity by the moles of substance ...
by Parth Mungra
Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:35 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Piston Problem in class
Replies: 2
Views: 93

Piston Problem in class

I am a bit confused on the piston problem. Does the external pressure on the piston cause work to be done, which then causes displacement? I don't understand how applying downward force causes the distance part of the equation (w=PAD).
by Parth Mungra
Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:31 am
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Antiderivative of work
Replies: 1
Views: 52

Re: Antiderivative of work

Well, the external pressure can be taken out of the integral, and then you are left with w=Pex (Integral from vintial to vfinal of 1 dv). This integral part just equals vf-vi, or delta v. It's the same thing as the previous equation we learned.
by Parth Mungra
Sat Jan 26, 2019 12:11 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Ka
Replies: 6
Views: 133

Re: Ka

If you wanted to find the total amount of hydronium ions, you add the hydronium produced from the H2So4 and the ones produced by HS04-. H2S04 dissociates completely but HS04- is a weak base.
by Parth Mungra
Wed Jan 23, 2019 10:29 am
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: ICE table and Q
Replies: 6
Views: 297

ICE table and Q

Does using ICE table only work for finding concentrations at equilibrium? Essentially, can you use the ICE table for Q?
by Parth Mungra
Wed Jan 23, 2019 10:06 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: All products are solids
Replies: 3
Views: 89

All products are solids

If you are trying to write an equilibrium constant for a rxn where all the products are solids, would this mean that the entire reaction has no equilibrium constant? Or would it be 1/[r]?
by Parth Mungra
Thu Jan 17, 2019 9:57 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Kw and water
Replies: 2
Views: 62

Re: Kw and water

Kw is just the Equilibrium constant for water, which undergoes autoprotolysis, a natural reaction (very few water molecules do this). By doing this, there is a concentration of hydroxide and hydronium ions. If you take the Kc of this reaction, you find Kw, which is 10^-14 at 25 degrees Celsius
by Parth Mungra
Thu Jan 17, 2019 9:54 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Acid and Base
Replies: 3
Views: 109

Re: Acid and Base

pKa + pKb equals the pKw, which is usually 14 (Kw= 10^-14) at 25 degrees Celsius. This is true if you add more acidic reactant or basic reactant because of the inverse relationship between the two. Ka x Kb involves canceling out concentrations of molecules and ions, so you end up with [H30+] x [OH-]...
by Parth Mungra
Thu Jan 17, 2019 9:49 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: when is x negligible
Replies: 7
Views: 549

Re: when is x negligible

x is negligible when the acid/base reacting with water is weak, meaning very little will dissociate into ions. Therefore, we consider this change in concentration (x) from initial to final to be so small that it can be negated.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:51 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: K vs Kp [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 92

Re: K vs Kp [ENDORSED]

What's the difference between the two? They are calculated the same way, but Kp doesn't include reactants/products in the aqueous/solid state?
by Parth Mungra
Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:49 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Q and K
Replies: 13
Views: 177

Re: Q and K

It was meant to be in comparison to K. A Q<K means more products, and Q>K means more reactants. Q can be calculated at any time during a reaction.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:48 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Q and K
Replies: 4
Views: 67

Re: Q and K

Q is the reaction quotient, and this determines which direction a reaction will proceed during a given moment. You can calculate Q by taking the concentration of the products over the concentration of the reactants. If Q>K then forward reaction is favored and more reactants. If Q<K, then the reverse...
by Parth Mungra
Tue Dec 04, 2018 1:28 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: When to use -ate
Replies: 1
Views: 33

When to use -ate

I was doing some problems from the homework set and I was confused when some problems used the suffix -ate. In 6th ed, Chp 17 number 29 c, the formula is [Co(CN 5 )(OH 2 ) 2 ] 2- . The name in the solutions manual is Aquapentaacyanocobaltate (III). I was wondering why the cobalt atom was called coba...
by Parth Mungra
Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:54 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Do we need to know en, edta?
Replies: 2
Views: 78

Re: Do we need to know en, edta?

En stands for enthylenediamine. It is a didentate, meaning it can form two bonds to the central atom.
edta stands for enthylenediaminetetraaceto, and this is a hexadentate, forming 6 bonds to the central atom.
by Parth Mungra
Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:44 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Roman Numerals
Replies: 3
Views: 58

Re: Roman Numerals

You have to look at the charges and the amount of atoms/molecules inside the coordination compound as well as outside. If there is a Cl 3 , then the entire molecule has a -3 charge. Look at the others and then fill out the charge for the transition metal. That should be your last step. Make sure the...
by Parth Mungra
Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:42 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: KBr
Replies: 5
Views: 120

Re: KBr

The above answers are correct; bromine is bigger, therefore forming a smaller, weaker bond, allowing the bond to be broken easier. For the salt part of your question: If you have NH4+, for example, this will give a proton (an H+) because then it can form to a NH3. This extra proton will then form a ...
by Parth Mungra
Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:13 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: bond angle
Replies: 6
Views: 134

Re: bond angle

You cannot find the exact answer. It's something you have to google. However, drawing the lewis structure can tell you if it is less than 120, or 120 or whatever. You won't find the exact number but it will you give an idea of the compound you are looking at.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:09 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 6th ed Chapter 4 Number 109b
Replies: 1
Views: 40

6th ed Chapter 4 Number 109b

The bond angle between the C-O-O bond is stated to be 109.5 degrees in the solutions manual. I was confused because I thought this was less than 109.5 degrees due to the two lone pairs on the oxygen.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:05 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 4.72
Replies: 2
Views: 75

Re: 4.72

If you look at the vectors of each dipole moment created between the N-O interaction, they end up canceling. The vertical aspect of one N-O will cancel the others.
by Parth Mungra
Sun Nov 25, 2018 10:04 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: sigma/pi bonds
Replies: 7
Views: 102

Re: sigma/pi bonds

How are pi bonds weaker if they are double/triple bonds? If they hold atoms side by side, doesn't that mean they are stronger since they cannot rotate?
by Parth Mungra
Fri Nov 23, 2018 1:49 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: reason for hybridization
Replies: 9
Views: 247

Re: reason for hybridization

Hybridization is experimentally observed. It explains how atoms, like Carbon, form bonds at the orbital level. It was observed that the orbitals mix to create something we call hybrid orbitals.
by Parth Mungra
Fri Nov 23, 2018 1:42 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic & covalent character
Replies: 6
Views: 208

Re: Ionic & covalent character

I think the characteristics are dependent on the atoms and the atoms they interact with. For example, in covalent bonds, not all of the electrons are shared equally, due to electronegativity differences, giving the molecule some ionic properties. Other molecules might not have this characteristic, b...
by Parth Mungra
Fri Nov 23, 2018 1:34 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: d-block
Replies: 3
Views: 74

Re: d-block

In terms of energy It would be in between the energy levels of the s p and d orbitals, just as how 2sp is in between s and p.
by Parth Mungra
Fri Nov 16, 2018 12:01 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Axial Bond Angles
Replies: 3
Views: 55

Axial Bond Angles

What are axial bond angles and how do they differ from regular bond angles?
by Parth Mungra
Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:58 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: hydrogen bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 86

Re: hydrogen bonds

Water, which it has hydrogen bonds, has a higher melting point because of the interactions between the molecules. The Oxygen's of each molecule has a slight negative charge and this has an intramolecular attraction with the Hydrogen of another water molecule. So, this attraction means it takes more ...
by Parth Mungra
Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:53 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: bond energy clarification
Replies: 4
Views: 76

Re: bond energy clarification

Those are the dissociation energy values for specific bonds between two atoms. This is the energy needed to break a bond. Ions have higher dissociation energy values while Induced Dipole Induced Dipole are lower. These values are always positive.
by Parth Mungra
Fri Nov 09, 2018 11:57 am
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Classification of Van der Waals
Replies: 2
Views: 60

Classification of Van der Waals

When describing the Van der Waals interactions, Dr. Lavelle said that these interactions are always present and always positive. What does this mean?
by Parth Mungra
Fri Nov 09, 2018 11:56 am
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole-Dipole
Replies: 1
Views: 56

Re: Dipole-Dipole

Dipole-Dipole interactions are different than induced dipole-induced dipole interactions in that Dipole-Dipole interactions involves one atom, that is bonded to another atom, having a high electronegativity, thus creating a polar molecule. The atom that is pulling on the electron more has a slight n...
by Parth Mungra
Fri Nov 09, 2018 11:49 am
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Bond Lengths
Replies: 3
Views: 93

Re: Bond Lengths

Bond lengths are going to be given. For example, a problem might tell us the bond length is 1.75 angstroms and we can use that to help obtain more information.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Nov 08, 2018 11:00 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity and Polarizability
Replies: 4
Views: 294

Electronegativity and Polarizability

Do ions with a greater electronegativity difference have more polarizability? So, NaF bonded, there would be more distortion due to the F atom having a much higher electronegativity than Na, creating an unequal electron distribution, correct?
by Parth Mungra
Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:13 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Units for EN
Replies: 3
Views: 89

Units for EN

If EN is a measurement of electron’s strength, then why are there no units for EN?
by Parth Mungra
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:44 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Midterm
Replies: 3
Views: 117

Re: Midterm

No, we only have to know what we have covered up to and including Wednesday's lecture.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:16 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Oxidation Numbers
Replies: 3
Views: 129

Re: Oxidation Numbers

For many atoms, you can observe their position in the periodic table and their valence electrons. Fluorine, for example, has 7 valence electrons, 2 in the 2s subshell, and 5 in the 2p subshell (2 in the 2px, 2 in the 2py, and 1 in the 2pz orbitals). Because of this, it needs to gain an extra one ele...
by Parth Mungra
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:10 am
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: resonance hybrids
Replies: 4
Views: 120

Re: resonance hybrids

This is for clarification: we can never fully know the structure of a resonance hybrid, correct? It has average bond lengths, but with the electrons being delocalized, there's no way to know. Am I missing something?
by Parth Mungra
Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:06 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: How to determine central atom
Replies: 8
Views: 171

Re: How to determine central atom

The atom with the lowest ionization energy and the lowest electron affinity is the central atom.
Some tips: If there are carbon atoms in an organic molecule carbons are most likely going to be the backbone of the lewis structure, but not always. Hydrogen will almost never be the central atom.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Oct 25, 2018 6:03 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Electron Spin
Replies: 3
Views: 71

Re: Electron Spin

A +1/2 is a spin up, and a -1/2 is a spin down. I don't know to what extent we will use this, but when you are filling an Aufbau diagram, make sure to follow to Pauli Exclusion Principle and Hund's Rule. When filling it out the diagram, start with any spin, I do not think it matters. Electrons want ...
by Parth Mungra
Thu Oct 25, 2018 5:54 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: orbital positions
Replies: 2
Views: 96

Re: orbital positions

Yes, but there is more orientations for the d subshell. There are 5: dyz, dxz, dxy, dx^2y^2, dz^2. Once you call one plane x or y or z, make sure you stick with them otherwise your orientations will overlap.
Hope that makes sense
by Parth Mungra
Mon Oct 22, 2018 4:48 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Bohr Frequency Condition
Replies: 2
Views: 59

Bohr Frequency Condition

I understand that if the energy of the incoming light does not match the energy required to excite an electron to n=2 or n=3 or whatever number (assuming n=1 is the starting position of that electron). What if the incoming light has enough energy to excite an electron to n=2.5? Because electrons can...
by Parth Mungra
Thu Oct 18, 2018 2:36 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Electron Density
Replies: 1
Views: 96

Electron Density

In the beginning of Wednesday's lecture, we went over that we have a math model that represents a wave function. I was confused on how we went from the wave function to the probability of finding the electron just by squaring the original math model. I'm confused because squaring a function changes ...
by Parth Mungra
Thu Oct 18, 2018 2:32 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Energy v. Kinetic Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 95

Re: Energy v. Kinetic Energy

Part A asks for the wavelength and you can substitute the momentum formula (p=mv) into the de broglie formula (wavelength=plancks/p) because you have the mass and the velocity of the electron. So it should look like this: Wavelength= (Planck's constant)/(mass x velocity) You don't need the kinetic e...
by Parth Mungra
Thu Oct 18, 2018 2:25 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: De Broglie
Replies: 2
Views: 106

De Broglie

I was doing a problem in the 6th edition textbook (Chapter 1, 59), and I was confused on how to get energy per photon. It involved using the De Broglie equation, but I don't know how to obtain the correct units because they do not cancel at the end.
by Parth Mungra
Thu Oct 11, 2018 6:47 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Light acts as a wave or not?
Replies: 10
Views: 149

Re: Light acts as a wave or not?

What's the difference between the description of ray vs light? Ex. Gamma Ray vs Ultraviolet light
I'm sure we won't need this information, just curious.
by Parth Mungra
Wed Oct 10, 2018 11:17 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Light acts as a wave or not?
Replies: 10
Views: 149

Re: Light acts as a wave or not?

I had a similar question to yours. During our Monday lecture, Dr. Lavelle said that we don't know what light looks like, but we have these two models. I'm confused as to why we keep using the classical wave model if we have found an experiment that shows the wave model is not correct. Why don't we u...
by Parth Mungra
Wed Oct 10, 2018 11:06 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect
Replies: 2
Views: 63

Re: Photoelectric Effect

You are correct about intensity and energy of photons. The intensity of a photon determines how many photons there are. A strong, intense light will be able to bounce off more electrons from the sheet of metal because there are more photons, and each photon interacts with one electron. Higher energy...
by Parth Mungra
Tue Oct 09, 2018 11:15 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Quantum Jumps
Replies: 3
Views: 61

Quantum Jumps

I was a bit confused on why electrons cannot flow from one energy level to the next. What's stopping them from going on a continuous path through each level, and why do electrons need to jump energy levels?
by Parth Mungra
Thu Oct 04, 2018 4:59 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Molarity
Replies: 3
Views: 62

Molarity

I was reading through the section on Molarity (G). The textbook stated something about "we use molarity of solute, not molarity of solution." I do not really understand this because I thought molarity was the same for both. Can someone help explain the difference?
Thanks
by Parth Mungra
Mon Oct 01, 2018 9:13 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Limiting Reactant
Replies: 2
Views: 184

Re: Limiting Reactant

In the reaction it takes 2 moles of water for every 1 mols of calcium carbide. The problem was given with information that will let you get 1.56 mol of CaC 2 and 5.55 mol of water. Because of the 1:2 ratio, we have to check to see how many mols of water molecules will be used with the given amount o...
by Parth Mungra
Mon Oct 01, 2018 8:57 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Chemical Equations?
Replies: 4
Views: 183

Re: Chemical Equations?

It can be viewed as either. Breaking it down by viewing it as atoms can make it simple to understand the reaction, but looking as the coefficients as moles makes mass percent composition easier to understand because the amu of each element is in grams per mole.
by Parth Mungra
Mon Oct 01, 2018 8:32 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Law of Conservation of Mass [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 186

Re: Law of Conservation of Mass [ENDORSED]

Everything the people said above me is correct: You cannot lose or gain mass in a chemical reaction. I know we are not at nuclear reactions, but this the law of conservation of mass only applies to chemical reactions. We can use combustion of propane (C 3 H 8 ) as an example of a chemical reaction. ...

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