Search found 34 matches

by 905109118
Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:14 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Defining Acids and Bases
Replies: 1
Views: 87

Re: Defining Acids and Bases

This video should help answer your question: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNXvokAcSuE
by 905109118
Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:12 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Resonance and acids
Replies: 2
Views: 82

Re: Resonance and acids

A molecule is said to have resonance when its structure cannot be adequately described by a single Lewis structure. Since a weaker base has a stronger conjugate acid, a compound whose conjugate base enjoys resonance stabilization will be more acidic.
by 905109118
Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:10 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Water
Replies: 2
Views: 68

Re: Water

pH decreases with increase in temperature. But this does not mean that water becomes more acidic at higher temperatures. In the case of pure water, there are always the same concentration of hydrogen ions and hydroxide ions and hence, the water is still neutral (even if its pH changes)
by 905109118
Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:09 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Conjugate Acid/Base
Replies: 3
Views: 84

Re: Conjugate Acid/Base

A conjugate acid is formed by a proton (H+). A conjugate base is what is left over after an acid has donated a proton.
by 905109118
Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:52 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: naming
Replies: 2
Views: 85

Re: naming

Only use suffix -ate if the complex has a negative charge.
by 905109118
Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:51 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Compound formula
Replies: 1
Views: 49

Re: Compound formula

[Mn(en)2I2]2+
by 905109118
Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:47 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: number
Replies: 1
Views: 69

Re: number

The coordination is simply the amounts of ligands present. For example (NH3)5 ... The coordination number is 5. However if there are two ligands present then you will add those two together. For example [Co(NH3)4(F2)3 Then you would add the number of ligands and that would be your coordination numbe...
by 905109118
Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:43 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Calculating pH
Replies: 2
Views: 65

Re: Calculating pH

You will need to know the molarity of the NaOH. Let's assume the solution is 0.1M. NaOH is a strong base, so this will produce 0.1mol/L of OH ions in solution. This will produce a pH of 13. You will need to take the negative log of 0.1 to find the pOH. This will work out to be 1. Since pH + pOH = 14...
by 905109118
Wed Dec 05, 2018 7:57 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Ligands
Replies: 1
Views: 65

Re: Ligands

Ones to remember would be: NH3, CN, EN, and H2O. These are most used.
by 905109118
Wed Dec 05, 2018 7:53 am
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: midterm question
Replies: 3
Views: 239

Re: midterm question

Well you're not really looking to balance the reaction on this problem. Its more of finding out how many atoms of each molecule (H, C, O) you have.
by 905109118
Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:03 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Can We Take The Final In Pencil?
Replies: 14
Views: 468

Re: Can We Take The Final In Pencil?

I'm the same way and don't like using pens but what I do is do my work in the small space of a corner paper and once I get it down I just rewrite it bigger on the other corner. Hope this helps. (:
by 905109118
Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:59 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structure bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 109

Re: Lewis Structure bonds

It all depends on the formal charge. Remember that you add bonds + dots to figure out the formal charge.
by 905109118
Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:57 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Double and Triple Bonds
Replies: 17
Views: 270

Re: Double and Triple Bonds

No they do not. (single, double, triple) bonds are all the same value in hybridization
by 905109118
Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:00 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Questions
Replies: 2
Views: 68

Re: Questions

From the previous final exams I've seen, yes it does ask for characteristics. Just to be safe, I would recommend to memorize them regardless.
by 905109118
Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:47 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Latin prefixes
Replies: 3
Views: 77

Re: Latin prefixes

Im not sure if we'll be tested on it but I would recommend you memorize them just in case.
by 905109118
Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:40 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Question 17.33 (Sixth Edition)
Replies: 1
Views: 75

Re: Question 17.33 (Sixth Edition)

a) Tridentate ligand: This is because there are three Nitrogens in this structure that each have a lone pair. No other atoms have a lone pair. b) Mono or bidentate Ligand: This is because CO3 can bind to one or two oxygen atoms. c) Monodenate ligand: Even through oxygen has two lone pairs, the metal...
by 905109118
Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:32 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Thank you to Professor Lavelle
Replies: 1
Views: 88

Re: Thank you to Professor Lavelle

Thank you Dr. Lavelle for going out of your way for students. He goes above and beyond to see his students succeed, which is incredibly amazing. Thank you for making learning chemistry fun!
by 905109118
Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:24 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: lone pairs
Replies: 20
Views: 313

Re: lone pairs

Yes the lone pairs are taken into consideration. The number of hybrid orbitals is equal to the number of regions around the atom.
by 905109118
Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:22 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Double and Triple Bonds
Replies: 17
Views: 270

Re: Double and Triple Bonds

No they do not. All bonds (single, double, triple) are considered as one bond. Hybridization is really more about regions of electrons.
by 905109118
Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:20 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: S Hybridization?
Replies: 5
Views: 102

Re: S Hybridization?

Shundeen Martinez 1D wrote:Can something just have a hybridization of s if it only is connected to one region of electron density?


Yes it's possible to have a hybridization of only s.
by 905109118
Sat Nov 24, 2018 5:08 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: double and triple bonds
Replies: 10
Views: 186

Re: double and triple bonds

Single, double and triple bonds are all one electron density.
by 905109118
Sat Nov 24, 2018 4:55 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Steps to figure out hybridization
Replies: 3
Views: 71

Re: Steps to figure out hybridization

This video should help answer your question: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xl0BD-tMeA
by 905109118
Sat Nov 24, 2018 4:42 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond angles
Replies: 2
Views: 44

Re: Bond angles

Basically, whenever there is a lone pair on top, that means they will push down on the bonds, causing them to have an angle less than 109.5.
by 905109118
Sat Nov 24, 2018 4:39 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Incomplete octet
Replies: 2
Views: 37

Re: Incomplete octet

The common examples of such elements are hydrogen (stable with only 2 valence electrons), beryllium (stable with only 4 valence electrons) and boron and aluminum (stable with only 6 valence electrons).
by 905109118
Sun Nov 11, 2018 4:47 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Solubility in Water
Replies: 5
Views: 143

Re: Solubility in Water

505168807 wrote:Would it also be correct to say that the more polar a molecule is, the more soluble it is?


Yes because polar molecules do dissolve in water as they form hydrogen bonds.
by 905109118
Sun Nov 11, 2018 4:45 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Acid vs base [ENDORSED]
Replies: 15
Views: 327

Re: Acid vs base [ENDORSED]

Roni Touboul wrote:Whats the difference between a Lewis acid and Lewis base?


Lewis Acid: a species that accepts an electron pair and will have vacant orbitals
Lewis Base: a species that donates an electron pair and will have lone-pair electrons
by 905109118
Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:22 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: VSPER
Replies: 8
Views: 162

Re: VSPER

What is VSPER? What do you use it for? The VSEPR theory, sometimes pronounced 'vesper', stands for Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion. It states that repulsion between the sets of electron bond pairs surrounding an atom in a compound causes these sets to be oriented as far apart as possible, giv...
by 905109118
Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:24 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Resonance Structures on the Midterm
Replies: 3
Views: 110

Re: Resonance Structures on the Midterm

905085650 wrote:When we draw Lewis structures on the midterm, do we have to draw all resonance structures or just give one structure that works? Thank you!!



I've looked at a few past midterms and they usually state if they want all resonance or just one structure.
by 905109118
Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:20 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: 2.37 (c)
Replies: 1
Views: 34

Re: 2.37 (c)

Hi! I am bit confused on why the statement below is false, if someone could clarify this for me thank you! (c) Electrons having l =2 are better at shielding than electrons having l = 1. The higher the value for l, the higher the orbital is, so it's further away from the nucleus. When l=1, an electr...
by 905109118
Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:16 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Exceptions to Electron Affinity
Replies: 1
Views: 47

Re: Exceptions to Electron Affinity

Hi, I was wondering what were the exceptions to electron affinity that we had to know? This exception rule is actually orbital filling rule. For two electrons to be in same orbital they need to have different spins (Pauli exclusion principal). This electron pairing requires additional energy and th...
by 905109118
Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:09 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Degeneracy
Replies: 6
Views: 300

Re: Degeneracy

what does degeneracy mean and how do we determine it for orbitals? Also when do we use orbital, shell, and subshell, I find myself using these words interchangeably. Degeneracy basically means of which orbital.bThe degeneracy of s=1, p=3, d=5, f=7 Think of it this way: Shell is n, subshell is l (in...
by 905109118
Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:58 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity vs Electron Affinity
Replies: 4
Views: 2802

Re: Electronegativity vs Electron Affinity

Could someone please explain what the difference is between electronegativity and electron affinity. In lecture they seemed like the same thing and they seem to have the same trends on the periodic table. Can these terms be used interchangeably? The difference between the two is that electronegativ...

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