Search found 32 matches

by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:15 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: ethylenediamine [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 153

Re: ethylenediamine [ENDORSED]

Yes, as it's a polydentate ligand.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:13 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Iron in myoglobin [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 312

Re: Iron in myoglobin [ENDORSED]

myoglobin lewis.png
myoglobin lewis structure
myoglobin lewis.png (19.33 KiB) Viewed 134 times
This diagram of myoglobin's structure shows that only one O can bond as there are already 5 other bonds taking place.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:10 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentate
Replies: 8
Views: 686

Re: Polydentate

To determine the kind of -dentate, figure out the number of lone pairs that can act as donors.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:03 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: edta
Replies: 7
Views: 241

Re: edta

As we know, edta is hexadente, hexa = 6 bonds.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:02 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: CN Charge
Replies: 4
Views: 131

Re: CN Charge

The CN ligand has a -1 charge.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:01 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: naming polydentate ligands
Replies: 2
Views: 128

Re: naming polydentate ligands

Yes, we always use the other set of prefixes (bis, tris, etc) for polydentate ligands.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 27, 2019 8:57 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Regarding the test... [ENDORSED]
Replies: 12
Views: 3717

Re: Regarding the test... [ENDORSED]

Yeah, Kw is provided, it's on the formula sheet, near the bottom.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 20, 2019 7:26 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 7
Views: 179

Re: Polarity

A polar bond is when the bonded atoms have different electronegativities; this causes uneven electron distribution, and makes it "polar."
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 20, 2019 7:23 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: name of molecule structure
Replies: 4
Views: 215

Re: name of molecule structure

This shape is known as a seesaw shape, where the it can be written as AX4E
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 20, 2019 6:58 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: A.X.E.
Replies: 4
Views: 165

Re: A.X.E.

No, lone pairs are represented by E.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 20, 2019 6:25 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: AXE formula
Replies: 19
Views: 880

Re: AXE formula

Yes, you can determine shape with the AXE formula. You should try to memorize them because it'll save time and guarantee correctness on exams, but you can also think about it in terms of regions of electron density, where X represents bonding pairs on the central atom and E represents lone pairs on ...
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 20, 2019 6:13 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Induced dipoles
Replies: 5
Views: 152

Re: Induced dipoles

Electrons, by chance, can clump in a particular section of an atom, forming partial negative and positive charges. These charges can cause electrons in nearby atoms to move around and clump together. Therefore, the dipole is "induced" by another atom's charge distribution.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Thu Jul 18, 2019 9:47 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: What is the correct Lewis structure for BrO+?
Replies: 3
Views: 824

Re: What is the correct Lewis structure for BrO+?

Since oxygen is more electronegative, it's not going to take on the +1 formal charge as easily as bromine. As a result, it's double bonded, and bromine has a +1 formal charge while oxygen has a 0 formal charge.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:11 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ground State
Replies: 13
Views: 284

Re: Ground State

When writing electron configurations of ions, you should write out the uncharged electron configuration first, then add and subtract from there. Since Cu is one of the exceptions, its uncharged electron configuration is [Ar]3d^(10) 4s^(1). Now to make the +1 cation you take off the last electron, ma...
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:05 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Molecular Geometry
Replies: 2
Views: 141

Re: Molecular Geometry

The bond angles for a T-shape are 180 degrees, 90 degrees, and 90 degrees, creating a "T-shape" as the name implies.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 13, 2019 12:54 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Nonmetals?
Replies: 3
Views: 130

Re: Nonmetals?

Most of the time, nonmetals are indeed more electronegative than metals because they are closer to a full octet, meaning they REALLY want more electron(s).
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 13, 2019 12:53 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Radius
Replies: 7
Views: 233

Re: Radius

An increase in electronegativity means that an atom has a stronger pull on bonding electrons. With larger atomic radii, electrons are further away from the nucleus. It makes sense that they have opposite trends because electrons being further away from the nucleus have less attraction according to t...
by Zachary Menz 1D
Fri Jul 12, 2019 11:38 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity vs ionization energy
Replies: 5
Views: 168

Re: Electronegativity vs ionization energy

Electronegativity is a measure of how strongly an atom attracts electrons. Ionization energy is a measure of the energy required to lose an electron. It makes sense that they have the same trend because an atom that strongly attracts electrons (high electronegativity) would require more energy to gi...
by Zachary Menz 1D
Fri Jul 12, 2019 11:30 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Trend of Electronegativity
Replies: 12
Views: 432

Re: Trend of Electronegativity

The general trend for electronegativity is that it increases across a period and decreases down a group. I think of it as being at its highest at the top right, and at its lowest at the top left. Fluorine (F) is the most electronegative element.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:54 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: E=hv
Replies: 20
Views: 611

Re: E=hv

E in E=hv represents the energy of a photon.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:46 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Energy of photon [ENDORSED]
Replies: 12
Views: 416

Re: Energy of photon [ENDORSED]

The method you use to calculate the energy of a photon depends on what the problem gives you. The equation for the energy of a photon E (energy of photon) = h (planck constant) * v (frequency). c = \lambda v can be substituted into the previous equation if they give you values other than frequency.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:36 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Electron Configuration
Replies: 9
Views: 263

Re: Electron Configuration

As others have said, this is an exception to the normal rules of electron configurations. As Dr. Lavelle said in class, the reasons behind this involve the fact that as the principal quantum number (n) increases, orbitals get closer and closer together. By the time that n=5, such as in your case, ex...
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:32 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Electron Spin
Replies: 7
Views: 277

Re: Electron Spin

Electron spin represents the angular momentum of electrons, and is noticeable when electrons interact with magnetic fields. In each individual orbital, there is one electron with a +1/2 spin and one electron with a -1/2 spin.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:25 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: wavelength
Replies: 11
Views: 499

Re: wavelength

Wavelength is commonly known as the "peak to peak" distance, but you can also use trough to trough distance. Amplitude is the "height" of the wave.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Fri Jul 05, 2019 2:38 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Speed of Light
Replies: 21
Views: 457

Re: Speed of Light

The speed of light is constant, and is represented in class as c = 3.00 x 10^8 m/s
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:53 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Theoretical/Actual Yield
Replies: 6
Views: 168

Re: Theoretical/Actual Yield

Yield will be calculated as a mass, usually just grams, but you could also see kg or mg in some problems. For percent yield, you're dividing a unit by the same unit so it cancels (like grams/grams) which is why percent yield doesn't have a mass unit, it's just a percentage.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:51 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs in the Middle of a Problem
Replies: 9
Views: 418

Re: Sig Figs in the Middle of a Problem

By using significant figures only in your final answer, you reduce the chance of creating rounding errors. Be sure to use your scientific calculator for calculations and use the unrounded numbers until you get to your final answer, which you should use significant figures for.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:48 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Determining sig figs
Replies: 10
Views: 363

Re: Determining sig figs

The difference is that 100 grams of something has 1 significant figure, while 100. grams of something has 3 significant figures. This is because the decimal point shows that the number is exact.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:46 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: All students read this sig fig post [ENDORSED]
Replies: 91
Views: 8923

Re: All students read this sig fig post [ENDORSED]

Yes, it was stated in class that incorrect significant figures would lead to a deduction of 1 point from your answer. You only need to worry about them when writing your final answer though. When multiplying and dividing (so most of the problems) your answer must use the fewest number of significant...
by Zachary Menz 1D
Thu Jun 27, 2019 3:24 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Combustion Equation
Replies: 18
Views: 667

Re: Combustion Equation

Regarding elements other than carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in combustion, my TA said that if there are questions concerning more complicated combustion reactions, a chemical equation would be given. We are only expected to memorize the "typical" combustion equation for this first test.
by Zachary Menz 1D
Thu Jun 27, 2019 3:20 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: H5 7th edition
Replies: 4
Views: 147

Re: H5 7th edition

It counts towards balancing the equation because subscripts display the number of atoms of a particular type. The important thing to remember regarding subscripts is that if you have, for example, (OH)2 where 2 is a subscript, you have 2 O atoms and 2 H atoms. In other words, the subscript 2 is sort...
by Zachary Menz 1D
Thu Jun 27, 2019 12:19 am
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Can someone explain why we use kg for mass as the base unit?
Replies: 4
Views: 166

Re: Can someone explain why we use kg for mass as the base unit?

Kilograms are our base unit of mass because they are helpful/coherent with other units in science. The example Dr. Lavelle used in class was that of Joules, where 1J = (1 m * kg^2) / s^2.

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