Search found 83 matches

by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 16, 2020 9:52 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Test 2
Replies: 11
Views: 31

Re: Test 2

Test 2 will be based on material after the midterm. Since much of the midterm was acid-base and equilibria, however, I would also study some thermochemistry and thermodynamics just in case.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 16, 2020 9:49 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Midterm Curve
Replies: 45
Views: 250

Re: Midterm Curve

I think he will curve the class to the median which is a B.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 16, 2020 9:47 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: STP
Replies: 7
Views: 41

Re: STP

STP is just 273.15K and 1 atm. These values are mainly just for theoretical calculations because 0K is not feasible in everyday life.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 16, 2020 9:40 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Delta S
Replies: 4
Views: 18

Re: Delta S

DeltaS total= DeltaS system + DeltaS surroundings

And temperature does help determine if a reaction is spontaneous. Using the formula deltaG=deltaH - TdeltaH you can see if a reaction will be spontaneous or not depending on T.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 16, 2020 9:33 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: endo/exo and temp
Replies: 8
Views: 31

Re: endo/exo and temp

Treat heat as another product or reactant. When I know a reaction is exothermic I write heat on the product side, as exothermic releases heat. If I know a reaction is endothermic I write heat on the reactant side. Then treat heat as you would a product or reactant. ex. if a reaction has an increase ...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 16, 2020 9:16 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Delta S
Replies: 6
Views: 28

Re: Delta S

entropy is equal to S. DeltaS is the change in entropy. If the reaction is reversible, the total deltaS, which is equal to the deltaS of the system + the deltaS of the surroundings, is equal to 0.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 09, 2020 10:54 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: 4A11
Replies: 3
Views: 11

Re: 4A11

haha omg I just wrote down 25 instead of 22.5 ok that makes sense now
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 09, 2020 10:51 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: 4A11
Replies: 3
Views: 11

4A11

"A calorimeter was calibrated with an electric heater, which supplied 22.5 kJ of energy as heat to the calorimeter and increased the temperature of the calorimeter and its water bath from 22.45°C to 23.97°C. What is the heat capacity of the calorimeter?" I set up this problem doing qcal=Cc...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 09, 2020 10:30 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: 4A.9 Help
Replies: 3
Views: 20

Re: 4A.9 Help

I was having trouble with this one too. I think the Cu final should be the same as the Water final.
The setup should be:
20*0.39*(T-100) = 50.7*4.18*(T-22)

instead of 20*0.39*(100-T) = 50.7*4.18*(T-22)
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 09, 2020 9:57 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: closed vs isolated
Replies: 10
Views: 29

Re: closed vs isolated

a closed system can transfer energy to the surroundings but not matter. an isolated system can not transfer energy or matter to the surroundings. an example of a closed system would be an ice pack. an example of an isolated system would be a thermos.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 09, 2020 9:43 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: 4A.9
Replies: 2
Views: 19

4A.9

"A piece of copper of mass 20.0 g at 100.0 C is placed in a vessel of negligible heat capacity but containing 50.7 g of water at 22.0 C. Calculate the final temperature of the water. Assume that no energy is lost to the surroundings." I am unsure how to calculate the final temp of the wa...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:49 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: 4A.3
Replies: 4
Views: 20

4A.3

Can someone explain how they calculated w for part a given "the inner diameter of the pump is 3.0 cm and the pump is depressed to 20.0cm with a pressure of 2.00atm" ?
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 26, 2020 11:44 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: pKa and pKb
Replies: 17
Views: 53

Re: pKa and pKb

pKa is basically the hydronium concentration while pKb is the hydroxide concentration of a solution. pKa and pKb when added together always equals 14. You can calculate pKa or pKb from having Ka(equilibrium constant for acids) or Kb (equilibrium constant for bases) and taking the negative log.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 26, 2020 11:35 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: R Constant
Replies: 21
Views: 62

Re: R Constant

To determine which R to use view the givens you have and then you can determine which R unit would cancel out the appropriate units to get what value you desire. For most calculations, like in the VP=nRT equation, it will be 0.08206.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 26, 2020 11:32 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: H2O as a Gas
Replies: 11
Views: 29

Re: H2O as a Gas

if h2o is a gas, you include it in the ICE table. You only don't include substances that have a set amount of space they take up like a solid or a liquid.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 26, 2020 11:27 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Reaction Shifts Left or Right
Replies: 15
Views: 42

Re: Reaction Shifts Left or Right

Because this is an exothermic reaction, an increase in heat will shift to the left because you can basically treat heat as you would treat an increase in a product on the product side. Having an excess of a product on one side will cause the reaction to go towards the reactants side in order to main...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 26, 2020 11:25 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Pressure vs. Volume
Replies: 6
Views: 24

Re: Pressure vs. Volume

One trick I like to use is to look at the relationship between the variables of the PV=nRT equation. because P and V are on the same side of the equation that means they have an inverse relationship. This means an increase in one leads to a decrease in the other and vice versa.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:51 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7838
Views: 1089301

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

If Avogadro calls.... tell him to leave his number ;)
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:48 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Le Chatelier's principle
Replies: 7
Views: 26

Re: Le Chatelier's principle

Le Chatelier's principle basically is a principle that is used to help one determine what will happen in a reaction when different scenarios happen that would affect its equilibrium. By following Le Chatelier's principle one can determine the course the reaction will take to re-reach equilibrium.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:44 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: temperature
Replies: 10
Views: 35

Re: temperature

When solving these kinds of problems, the temperature will most likely be a constant because changing the temperature during a reaction will change the equilibrium constant.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:38 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE Table
Replies: 4
Views: 14

Re: ICE Table

depending on whether the reaction is forward or reverse, then you can tell whether to add or subtract the change value.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:34 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: PV=nRT
Replies: 13
Views: 52

Re: PV=nRT

you can use this equation to gain information such as converting from concentration to pressure and vice versa.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:35 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: PV = nRT
Replies: 16
Views: 55

Re: PV = nRT

P is pressure
V is volume
n is moles
R is the ideal gas constant (8.314 J / mol·K)
T is temperature in Kelvin
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:33 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Concentration
Replies: 6
Views: 24

Re: Concentration

Are you talking about Kc? Because Kc itself doesn't have units because it is a constant. But in order to get a correct value for Kc there are units in the equation ([products]/[reactants]) that are represented by brackets, [ ]. These brackets represent molarity or mol/L.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:27 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Q
Replies: 10
Views: 27

Re: Q

Q helps to determine or predict the path a reaction will take after a specific time. It can be compared to K to make assumptions about the reaction at hand.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:25 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Kp and Kc
Replies: 4
Views: 28

Re: Kp and Kc

Yes, a reaction may occur with both aqueous and gaseous solutions. Depending on the question and data given that could help decide whether to use Kp or Kc.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:05 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Topics on Test 1
Replies: 37
Views: 175

Re: Topics on Test 1

Test 1 will most likely cover the objectives from outline 1, which deals with chemical equilibrium. To study I would look over the problem sets along with the videos posted on the class websites. I would also make sure to do all the problems listed by the outlines to make sure that you have a firm g...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:03 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Units for K
Replies: 21
Views: 57

Re: Units for K

K is a constant, meaning there are no units used. But, it is a good way to check your work if you end up with units because there should not be any because they should all cancel out.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:15 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Lewis vs Bronsted
Replies: 7
Views: 50

Re: Lewis vs Bronsted

Lewis acids are lone pair acceptors. Lewis bases are lone pair donors. Bronsted acids are H+ donors. Bronsted bases are H+ acceptors. Bronsted acids are most always the same as Lewis bases because they always accept a proton by donating a lone pair. Bronsted acids are a special kind of Lewis acid be...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:12 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: how to identify lewis acids
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Re: how to identify lewis acids

A lewis acid is anything that is able to take in a lone electron pair. Usually it has a positive charge or can be a expanded octet.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:08 am
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Options to reduce acid rain
Replies: 7
Views: 61

Re: Options to reduce acid rain

To reduce acid rain sanctions can be put in place on fossil fuel usage and power plants.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:03 am
Forum: Industrial Examples
Topic: Coordination compounds as Chemotherapy drugs
Replies: 5
Views: 515

Re: Coordination compounds as Chemotherapy drugs

The main drug discussed in class was cisplatin. Which is square planar and has 2 amine groups on one side and 2 chloride groups on the other side.
by kendal mccarthy
Fri Dec 06, 2019 9:01 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Final Topics
Replies: 2
Views: 33

Final Topics

What topics would you suggest to focus on for the final? Did anyone's TA give them a specific list of what type of problems or topics to study/ focus on?
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Dec 01, 2019 11:33 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent Shape
Replies: 29
Views: 187

Re: Bent Shape

Bent can have either one lone pair: which makes an electron geometry of trigonal planar because three things around the central atom and therefore a molecular geometry of bent. it can also have two lone pairs: which makes an electron geometry of tetrahedral because 4 things around the central atom a...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Dec 01, 2019 11:28 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma vs. Pi
Replies: 15
Views: 110

Re: Sigma vs. Pi

Sigma bonds would be stronger because of the overlapping orbitals while pi bonds don't have this overlap.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Dec 01, 2019 11:25 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Advice for studying
Replies: 58
Views: 555

Re: Advice for studying

I usually read the textbook and any concepts I have issues with I look for videos on Khan Academy!
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Dec 01, 2019 11:24 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Exceptions to Electroaffinity
Replies: 3
Views: 48

Re: Exceptions to Electroaffinity

I think as long as you know the general trends of electronegativity that should suffice. If there are weird patterns that might not seem obvious my TA said the test would include numbers of electronegativity to help.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Dec 01, 2019 11:17 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Content of the final
Replies: 10
Views: 151

Re: Content of the final

I don't recall covering this so far, but I guess we will see on Wednesday!
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:55 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent vs linear
Replies: 56
Views: 300

Re: Bent vs linear

Look to see the electron geometries and molecular shapes to help you decide! For example if there are 2 atoms bonded and 1 electron then it is bent, if there are 2 atoms and 2 electrons it is also bent, if there are 2 atoms and 3 electrons it is linear because the lone pairs balance eachother out.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:49 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: sigma or pi?
Replies: 20
Views: 102

Re: sigma or pi?

A sigma bond is any single bond in a molecule, including 1 out of the 2 bonds in a double bond and 1 out of the 3 bonds in triple bonds. A pi bond is any 2nd or 3rd bond in a double or triple bond.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:47 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: AXE Format
Replies: 34
Views: 122

Re: AXE Format

You don't have to write subscribts for X or E if it is 1. Only for 2 and above!
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:40 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding
Replies: 13
Views: 56

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Yes, because in the ranking of powers of IMF's hydrogen bonding is a specialized kind of dipole-dipole bonding which is actually stronger, so if a molesule has H bonding it will be polar.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:38 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: T-shape
Replies: 21
Views: 103

Re: T-shape

T shaped is when the electron geometry is trigonal bipyrimidal because there are 5 regions of electron density around the CE and the Molecular shape is t-shaped because 3/5 of the regions of electron density are atoms and 2/5 are lone pairs.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:23 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7838
Views: 1089301

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

How often do I tell chemistry jokes on here?

~periodically~
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:22 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7838
Views: 1089301

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

What kind of dogs do chemists have?

~laboratory retreivers~
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:18 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Week 8 HW
Replies: 4
Views: 40

Re: Week 8 HW

Ya it looks like the HW problems from outline 4 because it will be tested this week in discussion!
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:07 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Formula for Difference
Replies: 7
Views: 53

Re: Formula for Difference

I think the majority of what we will have to know are the basic trends. They also might give us numbers though if there are certain elements that don't stick to the status quo.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:01 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Chemistry Community Questions
Replies: 5
Views: 68

Re: Chemistry Community Questions

I'm pretty sure it's graded on a weekly scale, but I'm not sure. I'll ask my TA and get back to you.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 17, 2019 9:56 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Test 2 Review
Replies: 8
Views: 96

Re: Test 2 Review

My TA said

IMF, H bonding, molecular shape, VSPER, polarity from VSPER structure, bond angles, polar/non polar, intro sigma and pi bonds
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:00 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octet Rule exceptions
Replies: 14
Views: 114

Re: Octet Rule exceptions

Yes some examples are H, He, Li, Be, B, and Al.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:54 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Balancing This Equation
Replies: 11
Views: 107

Re: Balancing This Equation

combustion equations always have O2 on the reactant side and CO2 and H2O on the other, sometimes N2 depending on the organic molecule. 2C10H14N2 +27O2 ------> 20CO2+ 14H2O + 7N2
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:45 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge and Resonance
Replies: 5
Views: 28

Re: Formal Charge and Resonance

Formal charges help you find the most probable structure and from there you can see if there could be resonance structures of that structure.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:42 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Writing e- Configurations
Replies: 15
Views: 91

Re: Writing e- Configurations

I think they would tell you to write out the whole e- config or the short-hand one. They would definitely specify which to use.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:39 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: London Dispersion
Replies: 13
Views: 80

Re: London Dispersion

London dispersion forces happen because electrons moving can induce dipole forces due to attraction.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 03, 2019 8:15 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7838
Views: 1089301

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

This is kind of a joke but my class and I made a periodic table with pictures of literal moles, like the animal, and gave it to my teacher for April fools in high school. Kinda funny she was dying laughing.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 03, 2019 8:12 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electron affinity vs electronegativity
Replies: 4
Views: 29

Re: Electron affinity vs electronegativity

Electronegativity is the strength of an atom to attract an electron in a compound ex. in H2O oxygen has a electronegativity giving the oxygen a partial negative charge and the hydrogens a partial positive charge. Electron affinity is the energy released when an electron is added to an atom ex. Flour...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 03, 2019 8:06 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole moment
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: Dipole moment

yes. Non-polar molecules experience forces called Van Der Walls forces, which create a small dipole moment for a tiny amount of time when there is a difference in charge between two molecules. More polar molecules experience stronger dipole moments because of their innate polarity, meaning these for...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 03, 2019 8:01 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: definitions
Replies: 8
Views: 62

Re: definitions

electron affinity is the atoms affinity or how much an atom wants an electron and the energy it gives off when it obtains an electron. Ionization energy is the energy it takes to take away an electron from an atom. Usually, these trends follow a similar pathway on the periodic table as atoms who hav...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Nov 03, 2019 7:56 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic character in covalent bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 24

Re: Ionic character in covalent bonds

The stronger the bond in covalent molecules, the more ionic character it possesses. So look for molecules with a difference in electronegativity to tell the strength of the bond. If they are similar it will not be as ionic, if they are different it will act more ionic.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:45 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: p-orbitals
Replies: 11
Views: 41

Re: p-orbitals

I don't think it is a requirement to use x, y, z. You should only have to write it as whatever quantum number it is and then "p".
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:42 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: How to find my posts
Replies: 48
Views: 38072

Re: How to find my posts

You can also post a comment and then scroll down to the comment you made and click on the number of posts you made and then it will tell you the date and time you posted.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 27, 2019 2:12 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Ionization Energy
Replies: 9
Views: 27

Re: Ionization Energy

It is positive because ionization energy is the amount of energy required to remove an electron, which requires an input of energy. And it depends on the number of electrons and the number of subshells filled generally when dealing with ionization energies.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 27, 2019 2:06 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: What's the difference between subshell vs orbitals?
Replies: 8
Views: 64

Re: What's the difference between subshell vs orbitals?

Subshells are either s,p,d, or f on the periodic table.
Orbitals are inside subshells.
for example: s has 1 orbital, p has 3 orbitals, d has 5 orbitals, and f has 7 orbitals that each hold 2 electrons.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 27, 2019 2:00 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: oribital numbers
Replies: 7
Views: 39

Re: oribital numbers

What helps me is looking at the periodic table and counting how many atoms are in each subshell and pretending they are electrons, for example: for s subshells there are 2 atoms on the periodic table (2 electrons), in the p subshells there are 6 atoms on the periodic table (6 electrons), in the d su...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:14 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Atomic radii
Replies: 9
Views: 52

Re: Atomic radii

This has to do with the number of valence electrons along with the increasing number of protons in the nucleus as you go from left to right across the periodic table. This trend causes the protons to have a greater pull over the electrons, thus leading to a smaller atomic radius.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:11 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: why do we use these equations?
Replies: 5
Views: 70

Re: why do we use these equations?

Based on the question and the given information, it's kind of like a puzzle where you can use certain equations or combine them to get the information you are looking for!
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:07 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: E=hv
Replies: 43
Views: 2250

Re: E=hv

E represents the energy of the photon, as it is the constant times the wavelength.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:01 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: if KE is 0 how can the electron be ejected?
Replies: 4
Views: 54

if KE is 0 how can the electron be ejected?

How is the electron ejected if the energy of the photon is equal to that of the work function, meaning it has no KE? Because wouldn't it not be able to move if it has 0 KE?
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 20, 2019 1:56 pm
Forum: *Black Body Radiation
Topic: Will this concept be tested
Replies: 8
Views: 455

Re: Will this concept be tested

I'm pretty sure they are talking about black bodies. And I am not 100% sure if it will be tested ill ask my TA and get back to you! I don't think it will though because there is no module for black bodies on the class website and I think those are like the main concepts we need to know.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 20, 2019 1:52 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Unit for Wavelength
Replies: 34
Views: 165

Re: Unit for Wavelength

Hi! It seems mostly the wavelength, distance from peak to peak, is measured in nm, nanometers, on most of the diagrams in the book for the EM spectrum. But I'm sure maybe the tests will have us convert units to use in other equations.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:21 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]
Replies: 169
Views: 103466

Re: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]

I literally love this youtube channel for chemistry, I used it all throughout AP and regular chem in high school. His name is Tyler Dewitt. He is so succinct and I like his videos way better than crash course or any other teaching resource. Sometimes he can be a little slow so I usually watch on 1.5...
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:11 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7838
Views: 1089301

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

Here is one i found that sent me: Old chemists never die. They just stop reacting!
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:07 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Chemistry Community
Replies: 8
Views: 79

Re: Chemistry Community

Ya I think as long as you can see the number of posts and the dates they were posted on it should be fine so even if there is a grading error there is still proof that you posted in the correct time frame.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:03 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Photon Model
Replies: 3
Views: 23

Re: Photon Model

I like to think of photons like beads on a necklace or string, and each bead is a photon.
by kendal mccarthy
Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:55 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Test 1 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 107
Views: 2854

Re: Test 1 [ENDORSED]

I'm pretty sure they provide us with resources to take the midterms and tests with but I will definitely ask my TA to be sure.
by kendal mccarthy
Fri Oct 11, 2019 12:58 am
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: posting on chemistry community
Replies: 11
Views: 141

posting on chemistry community

Hi! When is the deadline for posting questions/responses on chemistry community? Is it on Friday of every week or Sunday?
by kendal mccarthy
Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:23 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Fundamentals E.3
Replies: 7
Views: 86

Re: Fundamentals E.3

I solved it like this: 9 Ga atoms * 1/6.022e23 * 70g Ga/1 mol Ga = 1.04616e-21g Ga and since you want the number of atoms of As to be equal to the weight of the number of atoms of Ga, you can use the weight of Ga you just calculated to get the number of atoms of As. 1.04616e-21g As * 1 mol As/210 g ...
by kendal mccarthy
Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:16 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Basic Question
Replies: 11
Views: 112

Re: Basic Question

There is only one limiting reactant usually, but like you said if the given amount of reactants make the same amount of product then both could be used in calculations that require a LR. Meaning you could choose either one to go forward with the problem because it wouldn't matter in the end.
by kendal mccarthy
Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:11 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: State Symbols
Replies: 5
Views: 104

Re: State Symbols

I think just for practice maybe to be safe, I am not sure if it is required for exams though
by kendal mccarthy
Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:10 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Molarity
Replies: 9
Views: 77

Re: Molarity

Molarity can be used to figure out the concentration of the solute in the solution. It can be calculated when doing a lab to get the correct concentration of a solution. it is also helpful if given molarity as a variable you can either solve for Liters or moles of a substance depending on what else ...
by kendal mccarthy
Thu Oct 03, 2019 12:48 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: significant figures
Replies: 5
Views: 76

significant figures

Can someone help me out with 0's in sig figs? I think this is right but I'm not sure. 20 would have 1 sig fig. 20.0 would have 3 sig figs. 0.00002 would have 1 sig fig. 0.000200 would have three sig figs.
by kendal mccarthy
Thu Oct 03, 2019 12:39 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Naming compounds
Replies: 1
Views: 51

Naming compounds

Hi! I was wondering if we will be required to derive a chemical formula from a name of a compound in problems on tests? For example, would there be problems that just have something like this: "Cobalt(II) oxide", or will the chemical formula be given along with the name like this: "Co...
by kendal mccarthy
Thu Oct 03, 2019 12:38 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Naming compounds
Replies: 6
Views: 73

Naming compounds

Hi! I was wondering if we will be required to derive a chemical formula from a name of a compound in problems on tests? For example, would there be problems that just have something like this: "Cobalt(II) oxide", or will the chemical formula be given along with the name like this: "Co...

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